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Old 04-19-2010, 09:19 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Everything Dog!!! System Food etc...

CANINE RAW FOOD DIET BASICS
Raw foods are the most powerful healers for our companion animals. They are the mostdigestible and absorbable nutrients that we can provide. They are the building blocks for our animal’s innate healing abilities - tissue repair and organ regeneration. The health benefits of the raw food diet surpass any other diet - homemade or commercial. The raw food diet is just as nature intended, an evolutionary diet fit for the digestive system of a carnivore / omnivore. Of course, organic and/or hormone and antibiotic-free is the best for all animals. However, just switching to a raw food diet is a
quantum leap in nutrition and further steps in refinement are relatively minor in
comparison. For example, homemade cooked recipes provide approximately 60% optimum absorbable nutritional value, whereas the highest quality commercial preservative-free pet food rates provide < 50% optimum absorbable nutritional value.

A balanced raw food diet provides 95% optimum absorbable nutritional value. Being a purest and offering only the best quality meats and organic vegetables as well as rotating vegetables and meats will increase the optimum absorbable nutritional value to 98%. Do the best you can for your circumstances.

Most dogs are so excited when they first get raw food – it is as if they have been waiting for real food all of their life. However, there are some dogs (especially small breeds) that can be a challenge, if you have one of those finicky eaters. You may want to try cooked meat at first and then slowly start cooking it less and less. Fasting dogs for 24-36 hours prior
to introducing the raw food is helpful in minimizing detoxification symptoms Use digestive enzymes for at least the first few months. Convert slowly by mixing 25% of the raw food with 75% of their present diet. Gradually increase the proportions of the raw and
decrease the proportions of their current diet over 5-7 days until you are feeding 100% raw.

Just as with humans, nutritional caloric intakes of dogs vary greatly with metabolism. This is not an exact science just as feeding ourselves is not a calculated effort for most people. The goal is to have an optimal “Body Condition Score” where they will eat far less raw food since more is absorbed and utilized for lean muscle tissue. In simplified terms, the optimal “Body Condition Score” is defined as a body condition where you can
see a definitive waist in front of the hips (looking from above) and you can easily feel their individual ribs. Any intentional weight loss should be gradual. Weights should be checked at least every other week in the beginning so you can determine the maintenance amounts of food for your dog. Guidelines for amounts to feed for an adult dog of average health and activity are about 1 pound of food per 50 pounds of body weight. Sample menus are provided below. Puppies, pregnant and lactating animals, as well as animals with cancer could require more than twice this amount of food. Very
active/working animals will also have higher requirements and might need special balancing. Determine what works for your individual companion.

For More Information:
Dr. Tamara Hebbler
Healing Hope (877) 738-4673


CANINE DIET
Ø 65 - 80% Raw Meat and Bones . The meat needs to be RAW – not cooked! For the most part concern over the use of raw meat is unwarranted. I have never personally seen a problem with bacterial overload such as E. coli or Salmonellaas a result of feeding raw meat. Everything has a natural balance and the digestive tracts of dogs are designed to ingest raw meat. As long as care is taken and the meat is not spoiled, there is not an issue with feeding raw meat.

However, precautionary steps may be indicated in animals with severely
depressed immune systems. Turkey, Chicken, Beef, Lamb, Venison, and Fish are all acceptable sources of meat, but do NOT feed pork products, fish bones, or raw salmon. Raw meaty bone sources; chicken necks and backs, (wings and drumsticks are only for the experienced eater), turkey necks, and beef ribs are good sources of bone. I recommend starting with ground meat and bones for the novice eater since gulping/inhaling raw bones can be a problem. Then after a few weeks slowly introduce chicken/turkey necks- section in smaller pieces at first if you
have a “gulper.” Judge risks for your individual dog- some “gulpers” are better
fed ground meat and bones only. After your pet has been on raw food for a
while, vary the meat if you can, steady feeding of the same food can lead to
hypersensitivities. Offering a variety of different meats is very beneficial, but just by feeding the raw food diet you are way ahead of the game. Variety at least 1-2 days a week is usually sufficient. Large breed puppies and geriatric animals should have a little less meat and bone in their diet.
5 – 10% Raw Organ Meat . This includes liver, kidney, heart, etc. from all of the acceptable meats listed above. Organ meat can be offered a few times a week or include a small amount daily with the raw muscle meat. Prepackaged, ground organ meat can be obtained from 80/20 mix contains organ
meat.
Ø 20 - 30% Raw Vegetables . It is good to include both aboveground vegetables and root vegetables. Broccoli, cauliflower, dark leafy greens (spinach, kale, mustard greens, green leaf, endive), zucchini, carrots, peas, green beans, parsnips, turnips, cabbage, etc. are all possibilities. Herbs such as dandelion, parsley, carrot tops, etc. are excellent but need to be in small amounts. Corn is not recommended since it has been extensively genetically modified and many animals are sensitive to it. Large breed puppies and geriatric animals should have a little less meat and bone in their diet.

0 -10% Cooked grain. Grains are only occasionally recommended for extremely
active dogs needing extra glycogen stores. Use grains carefully as they are the source of most food sensitivities. I prefer potatoes, yams, or sweet potatoes for complex carbohydrates. Working dogs or very active dogs are the only ones I think do better with a small amount of grain in the diet consistently.

0 - 5% Nuts and fruits . Great snacks and typical part of the evolutionary diet. Best to feed fruits alone as they are digested quickly and tend to ferment when fed with a meal. (peanuts not recommended because of associated allergies and toxins.)

Vitamin/Mineral Supplements . It is essential to supplement with additional
vitamins and minerals since soils and harvests have been depleted by overfarming.
High quality supplements include Animal Essentials, Vetriscience
products, Pat McKay’s products, TCInstincts, Celestial Pet, Kymythy’s kelp/alfalfa mix, Catalyn by Standard Process, etc.

Essential Fatty Acids . Fatty acids rich in Omega-3 are also essential. There are many varied opinions regarding which are the best and in what combination (i.e., cod liver oil, flaxseed oil, evening primrose oil, salmon oil, borage oil, hemp seed oil, etc…). I recommend a variety and prefer the combination formulas for that reason.

Calcium . Raw bones are the preferred main source of calcium, IF YOU CANNOT FEED BONES, YOU MUST USE A CALCIUM SUPPLEMENT! Bone meal is not recommended due to frequent heavy metal contamination- know your source.
Good quality calcium supplements can be obtained from Animals Essentials, Pat
McKay, Celestial Pet, etc.
Ø Eggs . Eggs are an excellent and highly absorbable source of protein. If the eggs
are of high quality, (free range–hormone and antibiotic free) they can be fed raw
with the shells broken in small pieces. I recommend Shelton’s or San Pasqual
brands for optimal quality. Depending on the size of the animal, one to several
eggs twice weekly can be used as an additional protein source. In older animals,
eggs can be fed daily to help with signs of senility.
Ø Milk and milk products . I usually do not recommend milk products because most
dogs lack the lactase enzyme which is essential for digestion of milk products
pasteurized cow’s milk can cause diarrhea and gas. However, raw milk (sheep,
goat, cow) is very well tolerated and can be introduced slowly into the diet if you
can find a high quality source. Processed or cultured dairy products (cheese,
yogurt, kefir, panir, cottage cheese, etc) are usually fine in small amounts and
work well for treats or supplement administration.
Ø Fasting . Routine weekly fasting for liver detoxification is a good idea. I recommend
starting with 12 hours and gradually working up to 24 hours. Smaller breeds may do
better with 12 hour fasts. Always provide fresh water.

SAMPLE DIETS
Wright’s 80/20 mix is one of the most complete prepackaged you can get with meat,bones, veggies and organ meat, so it is definitely the easiest for converting. You canstart with the 80/20 with rice to decrease likelihood of diarrhea detox issues and then after a few weeks switch over to the 80/20 without rice since grains are not a necessary part of the diet. There are many pre-packaged raw food diet brands. Do research at your local natural pet store or consult past issues of The Whole Dog Journal. Start with ground bone or chicken necks depending on your comfort level and then graduate to larger ones depending on the size of your dog. Always include some plain
muscle meat to keep balanced. You can routinely look at the feces to modify
proportions. There may be too much calcium if the feces are consistently white- cut back on bones and add more muscle meat. If constipated, add more vegetables and muscle meat and/or cut back on bone. If stools are loose, add more bones and/or decrease the vegetable content. Go with trends in fecal patterns because it is normal to have some minor fluctuations day to day (as observed in coyote scat) depending on
what is ingested. Remember you are balancing over time; meaty bones can be given at different times then the muscle meat/veggie mix. Gnawing bones are great on fasting days. If you choose to make your own raw food diet, some daily sample diets and amounts from Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats are listed below:

*Note: Feed food close to room temperature for best digestion.
10 lbs body weight
1) Raw meat: ¼ to ½ cup
2) Raw bone: 1 – 2 chicken necks
3) Veggies: ½ - 1 Tbsp. pulped (chopped and blended w/ small amt. of water)
4) Kelp/alfalfa: ½ - 1 tsp.
5) Cod Liver Oil: ¼ tsp.
6) EFA’s (flax seed oil): ½ tsp.
50 lbs body weight
1) Raw meat: ¾ - 1 cup
2) Raw bone: 1 turkey neck or 6 chicken necks
3) Veggies: 3 Tbsp. pulped (chopped and blended w/ small amt. of water)
4) Kelp/alfalfa: 2 tsp.
5) Cod Liver Oil: 1 tsp.
6) EFA’s (flax seed oil): 1 ½ tsp.
100 lbs body weight
1) Raw meat: 1 ½ - 2 cups
2) Raw bone: 2 - 3 turkey necks
3) Veggies: ¼ - ½ Cup, pulped (chopped and blended w/ small amt. of water)
4) Kelp/alfalfa: 1 Tbsp.
5) Cod Liver Oil: 2 tsp.
6) EFA’s (flax seed oil): 2 tsp.
4 Dr. Tamara Hebbler
Healing Hope (877) 738-4673Cardiovascular System ~ Heart and Blood Vessels
Performs the function of pumping and carrying blood to the body. Blood contains nutrients and oxygen providing energy that allows the cells of the body to perform work.

Lymphatic System ~ Lymph Nodes and Lymph Vessels
The lymphatic system includes the lymph nodes and lymph vessels. Part of the immune system that helps the body fight-off disease. Works with the cardiovascular system to return fluids from the blood vessels.

Digestive System ~ Mouth, Teeth, Salivary Glands, Esophageus, Stomach, Small & Large Intestine, Pancreas, Colon, Liver, and Gall Bladder
Performs the absorption and digestion of food and eliminates waste from the body.
Mouth:
Digestion begins in the mouth where food is mixed with saliva to lubricate the food as it passes down the esophageus. Dog's teeth are suited for gripping, tearing and shredding the food. (Go here to Canine Dental Anatomy). Dog's saliva does not contain enzymes for digesting carbohydrates, like humans who have amylase
Stomach:

Swallowed food passes down the esophageus to the stomach. The stomach of a canine is very acidic with a pH as low as 1. Food is well mixed and broken down before contents leave the stomach as chyme
Small Intestine:
Chyme is fluid that passes easily into the the small intestine, where the pancrease provides additional digestive enzymes. These enzymes continue protein digestion and also provide carbohydrate and fat digestion
Large Intestine:
Most of the nutrients have been digested and absorbed by the time any food reaches the large intestine. It is were water is absorbed and bacteria can break down undigested fibre.

Integumentary System ~ Skin and Fur
The skin is the largest organ in the body, it has many functions including protection for the underlying organs. The fur helps insulate against heat loss. Dogs and cats do not sweat through their skin. They only sweat from their footpads and nose. They lose water by panting rather than sweating.

Musculoskeletal System ~ Bones, Muscles and Joints
The musculoskeletal system includes all the muscles, bones and joints [shoulder, elbow, rear leg, stifle (knee)].

Respiratory System ~ Mouth, Nose, Trachea, and Lungs
Responsible for taking in oxygen, eliminating waste gases like Carbon Dioxide, and regulating temperature.

Urogenital System ~ Kidneys, Urinary Bladder, Genitals, Ureters, Urethra
Responsible for removing waste from the blood and eliminating urine. Genital organs determine sex and reproduction.

Nervous System ~ Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerves
Includes the brain, spinal cord and all the nerves that communicate between tissues and the brain and spinal cord.

Endocrine System ~ Thyroid Glands, Adrenal Glands and Parathyroid Glands
Includes several glands that produce hormones. Hormones are substances that travel through the blood stream and affect other organs. Endocrine organs include the thyroid glands, parathyroid glands, adrenal glands and part of the pancreas.

Hemotopoietic System ~ Bone Marrow and the Blood Cells
Includes the bone marrow which is located inside the bones. Three types of blood cells are made in the bone marrow: white blood cells that fight infection, red blood cells that carry oxygen and platelets that are part of the blood clotting process.

Special Senses of the Dog ~ Eyes, Ears
The organs of special senses allow the animal to interact with its environment; sight, taste, smell and hearing.
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Old 04-19-2010, 09:58 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Do dogs need vitamins? Yes, particularly if they are under the heavy stresses of hard training, vitamin supplementation is beneficial. As for specific vitamins, there are are several that have been found to beneficial.

Vitamin B12: This vitamin, given correctly, as a supplement, improves a dog’s appetite. Dosage should be kept as low as is effective, perhaps beginning with 1-2 cc/ dog / day; with a maximum dose of 4-5 cc/ day.

Vitamin C: This vitamin in moderate doses may be beneficial in several ways. It helps maintain the immune system and helps dogs fight off infections, especially viral.
Vitamin C is also helpful in maintaining the skin; Moderate doses are approximately 250 mg to 500mg twice daily for the average dog. It is not necessary to give mega-doses of this vitamin. Vitamins C and D work together in a dog to make collagen (a substance that strengthens the tendons and ligaments) and all dogs need vitamin C, just not from a dietary source.

Vitamin E This vitamin has proven beneficial in two areas, one in helping to maintain good footpads and as a mild anti-inflammatory. Normal dosage should be about 400IU / dog twice daily. Nutritional supplements and vitamins for pets like dogs and cats are crucial to pet health. Dog vitamins and nutritional supplements are tailored specifically for canines.

Glucosamine and chondroitin: This supplement has proven value if given in combination. This supplement, derived from shellfish, appears to increase the viscosity and volume of synovium (joint fluid). This, in turn, acts as a protective mechanism for the joint surfaces. The best use of this supplement is as a preventative medicine. The most benefit from this application is to start young dogs (2 years) on the supplement and keep them on it. Aim for a liquid if possible, it makes administration far easier.
The effects of glucosamine on the older canine appears to be the same, but if there are already arthritic changes, then the beneficial "preventative" effects are less; but the supplement is still helpful and recommended. A dose of 500-600mg per dog twice daily is adequate. Glucosamine, Calcium, and Manganese work to help the joints of a dog for deteriorating and strengths overall bone health.

This allows the dog to stay active well into old age. These elements also keep younger dogs healthier and minimize that chance of bone and joint discomfort during strenuous activities. Antioxidants help fend off free radicals that can cause harmful diseases. When a dog is given the correct amount of antioxidants, and supplements in general, their bodies stay healthier longer and they live healthier, happier lives.
__________________
"Home of the bone, heavy bone with substance, blocky brick shaped heads, dogs built with heavy bone and large heads but without compromise to movement, powerfully built dogs with full body muscularity from head to tail", the Bully look had begun. -Razors Edge
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:11 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
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KELP TABLETS


Your puppy is presently getting one half of a kelp tablet with the meat meal. At about 14 weeks increase this to one tablet and at about 5 months you can give two tablets per day.

B COMPLEX


Add one B 50 complex to the meat meal at about 12 weeks. When your puppy is 4 months old you can increase this to a B 100 complex tablet per day. If you prefer you can use nutritional yeast instead of a B complex tablet. Mix ½ tsp. in with the meat meal or add it to the oatmeal in the morning. Gradually increase this dose as they get older. Adult dogs can easily handle one Tablespoon of nutritional yeast mixed in with their food

PUPPY FEEDING SCHEDULE

7:30-8:30 AM (click here for comments)
½ Cup oatmeal plus fruit or yoghurt or egg yolk (cook the white until your puppy is older). (click here for a recipe for home-made whole-milk yogurt)

12:00-1:00 PM (click here for comments)
¾ Cup ground beef, turkey, lamb or pork (meat can also be fed cubed) plus one small spoonful of juiced veggies plus ½ half kelp tablet. To this meal you can add a scant ½ tsp. Cod Liver Oil or ½ tsp ground flaxseed. Two to three times/week mix in ½ to 1 tsp ground seeds and nuts.

5:30-6:00 PM (click here for comments)
Meaty bones i.e. chicken wings/necks (Until the puppies are about 12 weeks of age you may choose to break up the bones with a meat tenderizer or a meat cleaver. We run our chicken wings through a meat grinder.)

NOTE: You will have to judge how much your puppy should eat. Remember that puppies grow rapidly and you will have to increase their food as they grow. A Siberian Husky will usually eat as much as you give them so don't leave extra food down for them to nibble on in between meals.

NOTE (2): This feeding schedule and ingredients can be used on other breeds of dogs as well.

MORNING MEAL
The morning meal usually consists of oatmeal (use the cooked in one minute type of oats), ground meat plus yoghurt milk (yoghurt milk is simply a heaping spoonful of live culture yoghurt with enough water added to make it soupy) . To this I will add Vitamin C and any other supplement i.e. kelp, nutritional yeast, wheat germ, an egg yolk or a spoonful of cottage cheese. When your puppy gets to about 12 weeks you can switch him/her to rolled oats and delete the meat. You can easily fix these the night before by boiling the water, adding the oats, stirring, covering and remove from heat. Let sit over night and serve in the morning. Rolled oats are already cooked when they are processed so they don't need to be cooked again. Repeated cooking destroys the nutrients.
This is a good meal to add some fruit like banana or berries if you have them. (Return to Schedule)
AFTERNOON MEAL
I generally feed a meat meal which consists of cubed or ground up muscle meat plus veggies. I generally fix a variety of veggies for every meal. If you haven't added the kelp to the morning meal you can easily add it to this one. The meat should contain some fat - it should not be lean - and can be beef, pork, turkey or chicken. Examples of fatty meats - ground turkey (24% fat), ground beef or chuck steak (about 25% fat), Chicken thigh meat with skin, etc. Once a week you can add some organ meat to this meal. When you start your puppy off on veggies I would add about 1 small spoonful and mix it into the meat. As he./she grows they should probably get about 1/4 Cup of veggies at least 5 times a week. I prefer to mix the veggies in with the meat meal. Canines in the wild would eat partially digested veggies along with meat and bone so that is how I have always fed my dogs.
As your puppy grows you might want to add some ground up flax seed or nuts to this meal. I use a coffeee grinder to grind up the flax seed and the nuts (pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, walnuts or almonds) Use a variety for your dog. When I add flaxseed I don't use cod liver oil. (Return to Schedule)
EVENING MEAL
In the evening we have our raw meaty bones. For puppies this usually consists of chicken wings. I do use pork neck bones for them to chew on after this meal or anytime during the day. I usually give the second dose of Vitamin C at this meal.
At about four months you can probably feed your puppy twice a day. Just combine the meat and meaty bone meal together in the evening. If your puppy seems to have problems switching to two meals a nice meaty bone at noon will help him/her make the transition.
I don't recommend fasting your puppy until it is about one year old. At this time I also switch one day to a non-meat meal. I use eggs and cottage cheese as the evening meal and often use Billinghurst's milk meal for the evening meal.
I have fed a raw diet for some time now and have found that my Siberian Huskies need much more meat than they can get from a meal of chicken wings, necks and backs as described in the Billinghurst book. I add muscle meat to the meals for my adults and puppies alike. I have found that I can buy ground turkey (Wampler brand) for .79 cents if I buy it in a ten pound roll. Wampler does make a 3 and 1 lb. Roll which I can find in the frozen meat section at the grocery store or at Smart and Final. . This brand of turkey has approximately 24% fat in it. If you have trouble finding the cheaper cuts of chicken you can easily buy whole chickens on sale and feed larger chicken parts to your older puppy or adult. You will not have to add extra meat if you feed whole chicken. My adults eat two meals a day - oatmeal in the morning and meat/veggies plus meaty bones in the evening.
__________________
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Old 04-20-2010, 11:41 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Hun you asked me to critique, well I feel if you are going to copy and paste something from another board or someones website .. hmm I have no time to critique these types of post b/c the person who wrote it is not heard to defend why they do what they do. Also if you want me to critique the feeding you do with your dog fine. I have no problem telling you what you need to add, delete or give some more advice. Thank for posting this ..
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Old 04-20-2010, 05:13 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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well i appreciate the feedback. i was just wanting to know if the information that i found was correct. and i would be appreciative if you could help me with a recipe on a raw diet. how i should prepare it and store it bkuz i want to make it in bulk so i dont have to do it everyday before work... geist your one of the most intelectual people that i have found on health and nutrition thats why i ask you about my ponders. and if you havent noticed i reccommend people to talk to you, lol. i hope you dont mind...
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Last edited by fortyfootelf; 04-20-2010 at 05:53 PM.
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Old 04-21-2010, 12:54 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fortyfootelf View Post
well i appreciate the feedback. i was just wanting to know if the information that i found was correct. and i would be appreciative if you could help me with a recipe on a raw diet. how i should prepare it and store it bkuz i want to make it in bulk so i dont have to do it everyday before work... geist your one of the most intelectual people that i have found on health and nutrition thats why i ask you about my ponders. and if you havent noticed i reccommend people to talk to you, lol. i hope you dont mind...
I truly thank you for your compliment on my knowledge. I also have NO problem helping you come up with a great diet and storage plan.

What website did you get the info from?
Lets go from there ok ...

I love that you and others hold me in high regards. I feel very loved on this site. So please if you feel someone on here or others could use some of my knowledge please feel free to recommend.

Thank you again
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Old 04-21-2010, 01:11 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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This sounds more like a BARF diet than a RAW diet. BARF diet puts more emphasis on bones.

My understanding and humble opinion:

20-30% raw vegetables seems to me a bit excessive.

I also don't understnad the part about "gulpers", i know what they mean, but why feed a "gulper" ground meat all the time. With a proper RAW diet they will learn to chew.

regarding fasting:
i am disappointed that they didn't include the fact that puppies should not be fasting. ( perhaps im wrong on that though)

now.. i understand that the person writing the article is a veteranarian, but i also know that the education they recieve is very flawed. I'll take Deb's ( geithexe's ) opinion over any vet any day.

Correct me if you disagree with anything i've stated Deb.

nice read fortyfootelf, keep up the good work.

Last edited by NinaThePitbull; 04-21-2010 at 01:14 AM.
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Old 04-21-2010, 05:19 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geisthexe View Post
I truly thank you for your compliment on my knowledge. I also have NO problem helping you come up with a great diet and storage plan.

What website did you get the info from?
Lets go from there ok ...

I love that you and others hold me in high regards. I feel very loved on this site. So please if you feel someone on here or others could use some of my knowledge please feel free to recommend.

Thank you again
oh i already do lol. thats why i wanted you to check and see if what i had posted was true or not. i know alot of websites are full of bologna. i did copy and paste alot of this info but i actually did alot of research from alot of different sites to gather the best info that i could editd it to cut out all the bs and added a few things as well. my goal was to see which vitamins help certain parts of the body. ya know calcium... bones, carrots...eyes fish oil... skin and digestion... etc. i really cannot tell you what websites i went to bkuz i googled everything and dont remember what all i searched for. but i could give you all the information that i can in order to make the right diet for Big Red. Thank you Geist
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