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Old 02-09-2009, 07:06 AM   #1 (permalink)
 

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Things you need to know before breeding your dog

1.Decide the reason you want to breed dogs. Some people instantly think of money, but breeding dogs is not, and shouldn't be a road to riches. Here are some reasons you may consider:
◦Working Dogs. If you work dogs, and this includes hunting, cattle work, guard dogs, search dogs, or police dogs, you probably already understand the criteria for breed selection, and the qualities you expect in the whelps.
◦Show Dogs. This is a broad topic, but essentially, people raise and train dogs to obtain the very best qualities from a bloodline. This includes shape, coloring, temperament, obedience, and overall appearance.
◦Pets. This is a market which unfortunately drives the many "puppy farms" found across the United States, and probably in other countries as well. I do not agree with that why we have shelters go adopt.


2.Choose your Stud and Dam, and determine if they possess the qualities you desire in the offspring you expect them to have. Here are the items you should check before breeding:
◦Genetic background. You will want to examine the bloodline of your dogs, to make sure they are genetically good quality. For pure breed dogs, you can obtain their bloodlines from the AKC or other registering authority. For "mixed breed" dogs, the only background you may be able to obtain is the Stud and Dam who birthed them. which is not good enough imoYou will be trying to determine if the genetic history of your prospective mating partners will yield pups with the specific qualities you are looking for. You must also insure the pair are not directly related, to prevent genetic defects of "inbreeding".

◦Physical characteristics. Look at your breeding pair closely to insure you have the physical attributes of the breed you desire, with no deformities or undesirable qualities. An example would be someone breeding Labrador Retrievers, looking for signs of "hip displasyia", a common genetic problem with this breed which causes some degree of crippling and difficulty walking and running. This condition makes the Lab less desirable for hunting work, or retrieving.
◦Temperament. This is a quality passed on from the Stud and Dam to pups which is of utmost importance in breeds which have aggressive tendancies, like Doberman Pinschers and Rottweilers, so you should investigate the Stud and Dam's temperaments before deciding to breed them.
3.Make sure your dogs are breeding age. Dams begin "coming in heat", or having estrus cycles, at between 6 and 9 months, and come in heat about every 6 months thereafter. Most breeders do not breed a Dam until she is 2 years old, or the 3rd or 4th cycle. She is then fully matured, and physically able to endure the stress of carrying and delivering pups.
4.Have a knowledgeable person evaluate your dogs to give you an unbiased opinion of their qualities, and have a veterinarian check the health of your dogs.
5.Have your Dam checked for parasites, infections, and have her shots updated at least 2 weeks prior to breeding.
6.Wait for the Dam to come in heat[1]. The Dam will begin her estrus cycle about 3 days before she is ready to breed, and if you have the stud in a nearby pen, you will have no problem identifying the beginning of the cycle. The Dam's genital area will begin to swell and discharge, giving of a strong odor which the Stud will react strongly to.
7.Wait 2 or 3 days after you observe your Dam beginning to show signs of coming in heat, then let the Stud in the pen with her. There are varying opinions on how many times you should allow the pair to "breed", but the Stud can be left in the pen with the Dam for a day or two without any danger to either of the dogs.
8.When you are sure the Dam has been bred, you can remove the Stud to another pen, or return him to his owner, if you have arranged stud service from another breeder.
9.Keep the Dam healthy, giving her a balanced diet, and supplemental vitamins if they are recommended by your vet.
10.The gestation period for dogs is 63 days after fertilization of the egg, and fertilization will occur within 3 days of breeding.
11.Keep the Dam's kennel free of infestations such as fleas, and clean it regularly, as well as providing lots of fresh water and clean bedding.
12.Notice the Dam's nipples, and when they begin to turn pink and become enlarged, you can be sure she is carrying pups, and the delivery time is near. During the last three weeks of her pregnancy, she will require extra nutrition, so you may decide to feed puppy food, which is formulated both for puppies, and pregnant or nursing bitches.
13.Prepare a "whelping box". This is a box, about 6 inches longer than the bitch when she is lying prone, and a foot or so wider. It should have a rail to prevent her from laying on the pups after they are born, and all areas of the box should be accessible.
14.Place alternating layers of plastic sheeting and newspapers in the bottom of the box, so that as the bottom becomes soiled, you can slide out a layer of paper and a sheet of plastic, leaving a clean on in its place.
15.Be alert when the time for whelping (delivering) is near. Dogs suffer from still born pups, breach births, and other birthing problems, and if you see any problems, like slow birthing, or partial birthing, don't hesitate to take your Dam to the emergency vet, you will have no time to lose.
16.Keep the pups warm, and make sure they are all able to nurse. Examine them for birth defects, which may interfere with nursing or lead to trouble later. The Dam (now a bitch) will clean the pups, licking off the afterbirth and helping the pup position himself for sucking.
17.Write down the birth date, total number of pups, the number of each sex, and the number of still born pups, to use when filling out registration forms. If you are registering the litter, fill the form out as soon as possible, and send it in, since it takes time to get the litter registered.
18.Clean the whelping box bedding frequently. You may choose to use a synthetic material for bedding, which allows the waste to pass through to the "padding" (often pine shavings or straw) underneath.
19.Watch the puppies carefully the first few weeks, making sure they stay clean and warm, and the bitch is providing enough milk for them. At about 4 weeks, they will begin to get very active, and the whelping box will no longer be large enough, so you will now have to furnish them with a bigger one.
20.Take the pups to the vet when they are 6 weeks old. The vet will give them their "puppie shots", that is, their vaccinations, worming, and other required medical attention. Have him check for other health or hereditary problems, as well.


[edit] Tips•Have an experienced, knowledgeable person help select your breeding pair if you are not qualified.
•Pure bred puppies are usually the most sought after, but specific qualities may be found in mixed breeds, and a new "designer breed" trend is beginning, with specific pure breeds cross bred for specific qualities and characteristics.
•Do not raise pups just for the sake of raising them. The main reason for breeding dogs is to improve the breed, which is why you should take so much care in selecting the Stud and Dam.
•Allow your bitch to "rest" through at least one reproductive cycle between litters to strengthen her
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Old 02-09-2009, 07:24 AM   #2 (permalink)
 

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Old 02-09-2009, 07:35 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Old 02-09-2009, 07:36 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:40 AM   #5 (permalink)
 

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Up to 10 million healthy animals are killed in U.S. pounds and shelters
every year. The killing could easily be prevented by spaying and neutering.

Euthanasia is the single largest cause of death for dogs in the U.S. Each
year 27 million of the animals are born. Five to ten million we classify as
"surplus" and kill. That's about one million per month. These numbers do not
include the millions of dead dogs whose bodies we scrape off the streets, or
the hundreds of thousands of abandoned, severely neglected or abused ones
who never make it to our shelters to be counted and killed. The five to ten
million figure represents those we "must" kill because they are unwanted.

Most of these animals are young and healthy; in fact, it is estimated that a
majority are less than one year of age. The problem is simple: we have too
many dogs. Too many for the too few homes available. The solution we have
opted for is to kill the extras. This solution has been considered
acceptable by default, as though there were no other way to control the crisis. And we
spend over $1 billion every year destroying "man's best friend."

Why is this happening in the United States today? The number one biggest
contributor to the problem is the backyard breeder not the puppy mills.

This is a name that has become unpopular and no one wants to admit they are a
backyard breeder. Many people do not even realize they are part of the
problem. This is what I need to address in this post. The only way to stop
the needless killing of dogs is to stop the needless breeding of them.

Every breed of dog recognized by the AKC has a written standard, a blueprint
of what the dog should look like and act like. These standards were written
so that all would know what a quality example of the breed is and strive to
produce dogs that meet or exceed the standard in health, temperament and
appearance. To be sure you are breeding dogs that meet these standards,
your dogs must be judged by people who have a lifetime of experience among the
breed. Do you know the standard of the Pure Breed Dog? Does your dog
meet this standard according to an AKC Judge? If not, your dog is pet
quality. A pet is to be loved, cherished, trained, cared for, spoiled and
bragged about, but it is NEVER to be bred. No matter how cute or sweet the
dog may be, if it is not up to the standard, you have no business breeding
it.

If you have a purebred dog this does not give you the right to breed it.

Most purebred dogs are not breeding quality. If you breed your pet quality
dog, you are a backyard breeder, whether you breed the dog in your
backyard, garage, living room or an expensive hotel room, the term is still backyard
breeder.

If your pet quality dog has AKC papers, that's nice but it doesn't change
anything. You still don't have the right to breed it.

If your pet quality dog cost you $500 be glad you had the money to afford
it. You still have no right to breed it.

Do you think you can make your $500 back if you breed your pet dog or if
your pet dog is a color or size that isn't in the standard but you just know
everyone will want buy a pup if you breed her? Shame on you! Now you are a backyard
breeder with the purpose of breeding pups for bucks.

If the price for a tail dock or an ear crop seem high to you, what are you
going to do when your beloved pet needs an emergency C section. Will you
even be there with her to know if she is in trouble? Would you recognize
trouble before it's too late?

And if you still want to breed your pet dog but need to ask who's supposed
to cut off the tails and ears, ask yourself "What the Hell am I thinking!"

Do you think genetic testing is something they used in the OJ trial but has
nothing to do with your dog breeding career? You are a backyard breeder.

Backyard breeders sell pups that aren't up to the standard of the breed.
They do this for many reasons. None are good enough reasons to contribute
to the killing of dogs. Period.

Backyard breeders will swear all of their pups went to a good home. They
believe this but it's not true. Some may have been lucky enough to go to a
good home but more than half of them will end up dead, in a shelter, alone,
on a cold table with a needle sticking out of their leg. Some of those good
homes will get tired of the dog and they will just give it away to anyone
who is willing to take it. Some of your beloved dog's children will end up
living alone in a backyard, barking all night, cold and neglected until the
owner gets complaints and then that pups will be dead. Some will be starved
and beaten. Some will be bred until they die from it. Some will end up in
rescue and I will have to find space for it in my home and I will have to
show it that not all humans are bad. I will train it, and feed it the
proper food so it can heal. I will take the fleas off of it and I will get rid of
the worms. I will give it the shots it should have had but no one
remembered to give it. I will do these things because the backyard breeder didn't do it
and wouldn't take the dog back when it was 2 years old and full of problems.

I will spay or neuter that pup before I find it a new home so that I will
never have to rescue one of it's pups and so I can be sure it will never end
up in the hands of another backyard breeder looking to make profit from
puppies.

Backyard breeders are not responsible pet owners. They think they love the
dogs but it's not really true because they don't really want to be bothered
with doing all that it takes to breed ethically. They love feeling
important when they say "I breed "Pure Breed dogs"". But breeding pet dogs isn't
something to be proud of. If a shame on our society. It's the reason for
the killing that goes on in shelters. Why do you want to be part of that?

Do you want to be respected? Spay or neuter you pet dog. There's really no
other way. The kind of homes you want for your pet pups don't want to buy
from you. They are looking for responsible, respected breeders who are
doing something for the breed as a whole. Most of those who will come running to
buy your pups are the kind of people I wouldn't give a dog I didn't like to.
They are the ones who will turn your puppy into a shelter when the novelty
wears off. That's a fact.

Want to stop the problem of killing 1 Million dogs a month all over America?

Spay or neuter your pet dog now and tell everyone you know to do the same
and leave the breeding to the people who are doing something to better the
breed.

Then find someone who lives up to all of it and ask them to be your mentor.

Do your research. Know what you are doing. Have a savings account ready
for all the problems you will encounter. Buy the best dogs you can find for
your breeding program. Do everything your mentor tells you, he/she has the
experience and is not just trying to push you around. Be sure that
everything you do as a breeder meets the standards we have set for
responsible breeders. Or don't breed!

Let's make a difference starting now.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:41 AM   #6 (permalink)
 

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Probably the best definition I have found so far to answer "What is a back yard breeder (BYB)?" comes from Boxerworld.com:

"The average pet owner that breeds their dog(s)."





So, why are back yard breeders a problem? Well, they just breed dogs for the sake of it. They may have a sweet pet they want to try and reproduce or they think that their dogs are quality because they have papers and/or are registered with some registry. They think maybe they can make a few dollars selling pups, etc. They just put out dogs without real consideration for the future of not only the breed but the puppies produced.

Often, BYBs breed dogs with faults. This perpetuates fault and problems in the breed. They do nothing to prove their dogs are of sound temperament and that they are breeding good representatives of the breed, etc. They just breed. And often, they do not even breed purebreds. Some BYBs "create" neat sounding things and think they are breeds - like Dalimers. This was seen listed in the Washington Post as a rare, German breed. Well, they are mutts - crosses of Dalmatians and Weimeraners, nothing more than a back yarder trying to make a buck

But many people who show and breed dogs do so from their homes? How do you know is a breeder is good or not? Through EDUCATION and ASKING questions. These questions will help you out:

"Sadly, not all people professing to be reputable and responsible breeders are. A good breeder will all but interrogate you. You should also have the chance to question the breeder. If you are not sure or uneasy with an answer, do not hesitate to ask for an explanation. If at any time you get an uneasy feeling or just are not satisfied, look elsewhere. A few things to ask about are:

1. What is the asking price of the puppies? Some breeders will ask the same for pet quality and show potential puppies. Compare prices with other breeders of the same breed and if the price is considerably higher or lower do not hesitate to ask why. Do not hesitate to ask why if there is a big difference in pet and show pups. Unless there is a visible disqualification or the puppy visibly will not be showing potential, the younger the pup the harder it is to determine show quality. A person who really knows the breed can have a good idea what pups have show POTENTIAL and what may not. Much happens while the puppy grows and that eight week show prospect may not be show potential at 9 months! And avoid ANY breeder who charges different for males or females or who charges extra if you want a pedigree or registration. It is not that expensive to register a litter so the potential owners can individually register puppies. (Many kennel clubs like the AKC require all litters to be registered by the breeder. Then papers are sent out that are given to buyers of puppies so the owner can register them in their name).

2. What health tests have been done on BOTH parents of the litter? Any dog should have hips (OFA or PennHip), eyes (CERF) and ideally thyroid prior to breeding. Then is up to you as potential buyer to know what other tests the breed you are looking at should have. Even crossbred puppies are prone to hereditary health issues and parents should be tested prior to breeding for anything common within the two breeds crossed. Though a reputable breeder will NOT cross as the predicability in outcome is less and there are too many negligent litters of crossbred pups from unaltered pets. The breeder should be able to show documentation of all tests and do not hesitate to verify the results. Do not blindly accept their word – some dishonest breeders will lie and say all tests have been done. And if the breeder says there is nothing in the line so testing is not important, avoid this person as well. Some health problems are polygenetic (more than one set of genes involved – not a simple dominant/recessive). Some health problems take years to show fully or may be there but not showing outwardly. For example, some dysplastic dogs never show signs of having it and it is only diagnosed upon testing.

3. What temperament testing and socialization has been done? Granted, young puppies should not leave the property due to a growing immune system; however, the breeder should expose the puppies to as many things as possible like vacuum cleaners, children, house sounds, etc. The older the puppy, the more experiences it should have. Has the breeder temperament tested and what method was used? A good breeder will help match the right personality to you. If you are a quiet family and the breeder pushes a dominant pup on you, leave. On the other hand, if you like the look of one puppy and the breeder, after interviewing you, decides it is not the right match, respect that.

4. What goals does the breeder have with the breeding program and how does the breeder go about to achieve this? If the breeder breeds just to produce more dogs, for pets only or anything that does not go towards the bettering of the breeder's lines and the breed as a whole, go elsewhere. And if the breeder breeds for working ability first, you could end up with a handful! Look for one who breeds for companionship as well as type and working ability – unless you are looking exclusively for a working dog.

5. What does the breeder feel are the strengths and weaknesses in the breed and the breeder's program? The breeder should be open with you about the program and where they hope to go with it. Avoid the breeder who insists there are no better dogs around then his.

6. Can you see the pedigrees of both sire and dam? Can you see at least the dam on premises? The sire may not be on site but the dam should be. If not, you could be dealing with a broker (one who sells dogs not bred by that person).

7. What type of contract does the breeder have for pet or show puppies (it should include a spay/neuter agreement and health guarantee)? Do not get pressured into becoming contracted to show or breed your dog – even if you do plan to show and possibly get into breeding someday. Everything should be spelled out in the contract. And be wary of a breeder sells you a young puppy that is "definitely show quality." So much happens during growth and development – the younger the puppy; the harder it is to tell show quality. A breeder who really knows the breed can tell if a young pup has POTENTIAL but should not be guaranteeing the dog will be a show dog. Another red flag is the breeder who has no written contract at all. All puppies whether pet or show potential should be sold with a written contract.

8. What does the breeder feed the puppies? You want to try and keep the puppies on the same brand of food. If the breeder uses something you do not, gradually wean the puppy to your preferred brand.

9. What inoculations have been given? Eight-week-old puppies should have had their first set of inoculations and you should be given documentation of this. If not, go elsewhere. If the puppies have no boosters prior to leaving the dam, look elsewhere.

10. Can you get references of previous puppy buyers? If the breeder will not give them, go elsewhere.

11. Can you have your own vet examine the puppy before you fully commit? You may be asked to put down a deposit but you should have the option of having your vet examine the puppy with in a couple days after purchase (always a good idea to have this done and the breeder may require it).

12. Are you active in any breed clubs (all breed or ideally breed specialty)? Many clubs have a breeder code of ethics that they want their members to adhere to. Just being AKC registered is not a Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. It just means the puppy was from registered parents and the breeder has taken the steps to begin the registration process for the puppies. Even pet stores can sell AKC registered pups if the miller registers the dogs. The AKC cannot police everyone professing to be a breeder so again, being and educated consumer is very important.

Use your gut instinct and do not get suckered by cute faces or sob stories. Remember, this pup will be yours for the next ten years or much longer depending on breed. You should get the best possible puppy possible from the most responsible source you can find should you go the breeder route.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:45 AM   #7 (permalink)
 

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I author humane education materials for schools. For over 22 years, I've fostered, rehabilitated and placed rescued dogs of many breeds. Dalmatians are one of my specialty breeds but I also rescue, train and foster many others as well. Because of this, I WANT to speak out today on the issue of breeding for fun and profit. Some of you will be upset by this written piece and that is good, maybe you'll help us do something about the problem. For, each person who throws their arms in the air, or rolls their eyes in disgust for something I’ve said in this piece, you are the likely intended target. For verification on anything I say on this page, ask ANY person associated with an animal welfare group or facility – ANYWHERE.
If you take personal offense to it then you need to examine your activities very carefully as you are likely my target or reason for writing this. If you wish to respond negatively to this, you will find you won't get much support from myself or those who are knowledgeable. I am speaking OUT today, not only for myself, but also for all rescuers across the nation, the very limited numbers of the ‘respectable’ breeders around the country and all of the responsible pet guardians. Therefore, I will not say, "In my humble opinion", as this opinion is shared by the respected breeders and pet guardians, as well as the ASPCA, Humane Society of the United States and all of the Shelters and other Humane/Animal Welfare organizations in this country.

BACKYARD BREEDERS ARE -
**Anyone who has a litter for fun, profit or by ‘accident’.
**Anyone who is so uninformed that they think having AKC papers means that their pet is breeding quality. REDICULOUS!!
**Anyone who advertises their litters in the local paper for sale. (respected breeders only advertise in trade magazines)
**Anyone who thinks that by finding their puppies good homes that they somehow don’t have to play by the rules or take responsibility. MANY WILL STILL ULTIMATELY END UP IN THE POUND AFTER YEARS OF ABUSE OR NEGLECT!!!
**Anyone who thinks they found their litter good homes, simply because everyone that took one, smiled honestly and ‘promised’ to treat them well.. Thus insisting on no background check, no enforceable contract or any type of follow up. A PERFECT RECIPE FOR A SAD LIFE FOR THE POOR PUPPY.
**People will provide erroneous information to the potential adopters regarding the required care and treatment necessary for the pet - simply for their own personal gains and claim to know much more than they really do for ego boosts.
**Respectable breeders will have walls adorned with trophies and certificates which represent the numerous championships they’ve acquired over the years.


Up to 8 million healthy animals are killed in U.S. pounds and shelters every year. The majority of killing could easily be prevented by spaying OR neutering. Euthanasia is the single largest cause of death for dogs in the U.S. Each year 27 million DOGS are born. 8 or more million we classify as "surplus" ARE killed. That's about ¾ million per month. These numbers do not include the millions of dead dogs whose bodies we scrape off the streets, the growing number that are put to sleep at vets’ offices or the hundreds of thousands THAT ARE abandoned.

LET'S NOT FORGET THE severely neglected or abused ones who never make it to our shelters to be counted and OR EUTHANIZED. The ten million figure represents those we "MUST" kill because they are unwanted!!! Most of these animals are young and healthy; in fact, it is estimated that a majority are less than one year of age. The problem is simple: we have too many dogs...Too many for the too few homes available TO THEM. The solution we have opted for is to kill the extras. This solution has been considered acceptable by default, as though there were no other way to control the crisis. And we spend over $11 billion every year destroying "man's best friend."
A common sense look that you cannot deny or argue with: If you were part of a company who made ‘pets’ and every year for the past 20 years, you had been overstocked to the point of having to dispose of the overstocked inventory, what would you suggest they do this year to improve? So, if you KNOW we are killing this vast number of innocent, loving animals each year, why in the world would you think that having a litter of puppies or kittens is OK?
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:45 AM   #8 (permalink)
 

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Why is this happening in the United States today? The number one biggest contributor to the problem is the "backyard breeder" not the puppy mills. This is a name that has become unpopular and no one wants to admit they are a "backyard breeder".(Anyone having a litter in their home with just the family pet as one of the breeding parents, and advertise in the local papers) Many people do not even realize they are part of the problem. This is what I need to address in this post. The only way to stop the needless killing of dogs is to stop the needless breeding of them.
Every breed of dog recognized by the AKC has a written standard, a blueprint of what the dog should look like and act like. These standards were written so that all would know what a quality example of the breed is and strive to produce dogs that meet or exceed the standard in health, temperament and appearance. To be sure you are breeding dogs that meet these standards, your dogs must be judged by people who have a lifetime of experience among the breed. If your personal dog has not yet been in front of a judge, then you do NOT have an AKC standard dog, you have one that is pet quality and that is fine. AKC papers DO NOT signify a dog with Breeding quality standards!!!!!
. A pet is to be loved, cherished, trained, cared for, spoiled and bragged about, but it is NEVER to be bred. No matter how cute or sweet the dog may be, if it is not up to the standard, you have no business breeding it. Even if you have a purebred dog this does not give you the right to breed it. Most purebred dogs are not breeding quality. If you breed your pet quality dog, you are a "backyard breeder", whether you breed the dog in your backyard, garage, living room or an expensive hotel room, the term is still backyard breeder. If your pet quality dog has AKC papers, that's nice but it doesn't change anything. You still don't have the right to breed it. If your pet quality dog cost you $500 be glad you had the money to afford it. You still have no right to breed it.

Do you think you can RECOUP your $500 INVESTMENT if you breed your pet dog? OR DO YOU THINK YOUR pet dog is a color or size that isn't in the standard but you just know everyone will want buy a pup if you breed her? Shame on you! Now you are a "backyard breeder" with the purpose of breeding pups for fun and profit. That is despicable!!!

If the price for a tail dock or an ear crop seems high to you, what are you going to do when your beloved pet needs an emergency C-section? Will you even be there to know if she is in trouble? Would you recognize trouble before its too late AND BE MONETARILY ABLE TO SEEK VETERINARY HELP?
If you still want to breed your pet but need to ask, "Who's suppose to cut off the tails and ears"? Ask yourself, "What the Hell am I thinking?" Do you think genetic testing is something they used in the OJ trial but has nothing to do with your dog-breeding career you are a "backyard breeder".

"Backyard breeders" sell pups that aren't up to the standard of the breed. They do this for many reasons. None are good enough reasons to contribute to the killing of dogs. Period.

"Backyard breeders" will swear all of their pups went to a good home. They believe this, but it's not NECESSARILY true. Some may have been lucky enough to go to a good home at the time of adoption, but more than half of them will end up dead, in a shelter alone, on a cold table with a needle sticking out of their leg. Why? Because the Backyard Breeder didn’t follow through or even know enough about adoptions to ask the right questions up front. Some of those good homes will get tired of the dog and they will just give it away to anyone who is willing to take it. Some of your beloved dog's children will end up living alone in a backyard, barking all night, cold and neglected until the guardian gets complaints and then that pups will be dead. Some will be starved and beaten. Some will be bred until they die from THE MANY BIRTHS.
Some will end up in rescue and I will have to find space for it in my home. I will GIVE IT LOVE TO SHOW IT that not all humans are bad. I will train it, and feed it the proper food so it can heal, MENTALLY AS WELL AS PHYSICALLY. I will take the fleas off and I will get rid of the worms. I will give it the shots it should have had but no one remember to DO it. I will do these things because the "backyard breeder" didn't. I will spay or neuter that pup before I find it a new home so that I will never have to rescue one of it's pups. THAT WAY I CAN BE ASSURED it will never end up in the hands of another "backyard breeder" looking to make profit from puppies.

"Backyard breeders" are not responsible pet guardians. They claim that they love the dogs but it's not true because they don't really want to be bothered with doing all that it takes to breed ethically. They love feeling important when they say, "I breed mini schnauzers". But breeding pet dogs isn't something to be proud of. IT'S a shame on our society. It's the reason for the killing that goes on in shelters. Why do you want to be part of that? Do you want to be respected? Spay or neuter you pet dog. There's really no other way. The kind of homes you want for your pet pups don't want to buy from you. They are looking for responsible, respected breeders who are doing something for the breed as a whole. Most of those WHO WILL BUY your pups are the kind of people I wouldn't give a dog I didn't like to. They are the ones who will turn your puppy into a shelter when the novelty wears off. That's a PROVEN fact. Want to stop the problem of killing 1 Million dogs a month all over America? Spay or neuter your pet dog now and tell everyone you know to do the same. Leave the breeding to the people who are doing something to better the breed.

DO you want to have a litter of puppies to show your children the miracle of life? Then to be fair and honest, volunteer yourself and your children to work at the county dog pound for no less than thirty days to show them the miracle of death.
AS A "BACKYARD BREEDER" THAT'S WHAT YOU'RE CONTRIBUTING TO. YOU ARE CONTRIBUTING TO THIS MASSIVE PROBLEM NATIONWIDE.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:52 AM   #9 (permalink)
 

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https://www.gopitbull.com/bloodline-d...de-ethics.html
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Old 02-09-2009, 11:59 AM   #11 (permalink)
 
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You forgot part of the dam's profile like....taking her to the vet before, during and after her pregnancy.

She needs to also have a healthy check, checked for hip dysplasia, blood work,,etc...done before breeding.

She needs ultrasounds, regular pregnancy check-ups, money on the side for emergencies like c-section, etc.

The her and the pups would all need to be seen after birth.

Plus there will be the puppy care, shots, deworming, vet check, etc. Not to mention the time it takes to raise pups. Are they willing to go the distance if the mother rejects the pups or something happens to her. There would be a every 2 hour feeding schedule. Making the pups, if extremely young, go to the bathroom because they can not do it on their own at first...would you know how?

The pro's and con's both need to be looked at....IMO...


Just thought that it might need to be in there. Breeding is not a joke and can be quite expensive. These young people need to know how much goes into these dogs, esp. if they wanted to be considered a reputable breeder one day.
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Last edited by MetalGirl30; 02-09-2009 at 12:05 PM.
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Old 02-09-2009, 01:58 PM   #12 (permalink)
 

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Very well done Sadie thank you I was to tired last night to come up with all of that.
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Old 03-18-2009, 02:54 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Thumbs up GREAT POST!!!!!!!!!!

THIS WAS A GREAT POST!!!! I AM STILL LEARNING ABOUT BREEDING AND ALL THE INFORMATION I GOT FROM THIS WAS GREAT!!!! CURRENTLY, I HAVE A WYCAN/MAYDAY FEMALE THAT I WANA BREED BUT IM WAITING UNTIL I LEARN MORE ABOUT IT BEFORE I DO. MY PARTNER HAS A GRANDSON OF HEARTBREAKER AND WE WERE THINKING ABOUT DOING THE BREEDING BUT I'VE BEEN WAITING. THANKS FOR THE INFO.........
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Old 03-21-2009, 04:33 PM   #14 (permalink)
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from a new owner perspective the information here is priceless thanks!
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Old 04-19-2009, 03:34 AM   #15 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by zeeshan66 View Post
from a new owner perspective the information here is priceless thanks!
totally agree
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