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Old 10-14-2007, 11:15 PM   #1 (permalink)
Chain Set-Ups: Part 1
GSDBulldog GSDBulldog is offline 10-14-2007, 11:15 PM
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There seems to be much misunderstanding regarding the usage of a chain set-up as a means of confinement. Hopefully this post will clear up any possible concerns or questions.



A proper chain and axle set-up is a safe and effective way to house most dogs, but paticulary bulldogs; one of the many Houdini's of the dog world. A good set-up is out of the way of any debris (Including brush, weeds, trees, etc.) that the dog could get tangled up in. There is little, if any, risk involved with a proper chain set-up. But as with any means of confinement, it has both pro's and con's.

Pro's


* Almost entirely escape proof.
* Easy on the wallet.
* Provides more square footage than the average kennel run.
* A good housing option for those with multiple dogs.



Con's


* Risk of theft. Best to keep that chain set-up behind a privacy fence.
* Loose dogs and/or other animals wandering into the yard can be a concern.
* Possibility of strangulation if the dog becomes entangled (Very low risk)
* Oversized chains can injur or debilitate a dog.



What is a "proper" chain set-up?

A proper chain set-up is a safe one. The area will be clean and free of objects that don't belong there. The hardware (Including any extra pieces you might use) is well-maintained and checked daily. Adequate water and shelter will be provided if the dog will be spending any length of time on the chain.

Hardware is a very important part of a proper chain set-up. Only the best of the best should be used. Cut corners here and you may end up with a dead dog. For solid and durable hardware, http://www.stillwaterkennelsupply.com/hardware.htm

1/4" thick chain is standard, and can accomodate even the strongest dogs. Many people have the misconception that a larger chain is somehow more secure and this is simply not true. The "grade" of the chain is more important than the size. For more information on grading chain please visit: http://www.1st-chainsupply.com/aboutgrading.htm.

As stated earlier, too-large of a chain can injur and debilitate your dog. The cervical vertebrae of the neck are not designed to hold excess weight; overtime a heavy object hanging from the dogs neck can cause pain and injury.

What is wrong with this picture?



Note the lack of a collar combined with the use of an oversized chain. This can cause both structural injury, as well as rubbing the neck raw over time. There is not noted water source, nor a proper shelter. Situations like these ruin it for folks who utilize chain set-ups responsibly.

*Note, no dogs were harmed. It was just a staged photo.

TO BE CONTINUED...
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Old 01-20-2008, 08:04 AM   #2 (permalink)
 

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i would like to give another suggestion instead of a chain and thought to be just as strong. i was at walmart and found a metal cable tie out with a coating over the cable, to me these are just as strong as a heavy duty chain. the one i got was on clearence for 10 bucks and was 20 feet long just a alternative people.
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Old 02-09-2008, 04:50 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Figgy1682
i would like to give another suggestion instead of a chain and thought to be just as strong. i was at walmart and found a metal cable tie out with a coating over the cable, to me these are just as strong as a heavy duty chain. the one i got was on clearence for 10 bucks and was 20 feet long just a alternative people.
I've had bad luck with cables. They tangle easily- and when knots form, it can erode the protective coating, causing the cable to eventually rust and snap (Not to mention, destructive dogs will chew right through them). Again, this is why checking your set-ups daily is important.

The cheap hardware store-bought cable tie outs come with are not appropriate for most dogs; one good tug and they'll pop right off. If you do go with a cable set-up, go the full mile and head out to your local hardware store .
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Old 02-09-2008, 05:32 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
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GSD is right, you do get what you pay for. If you want a cable, go to a hardware store, the are not very expensive. Also to keep them from tangling, put double swivels on both ends of the cable.
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Old 02-09-2008, 08:44 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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On the chain setups/ any setups, its not a bad idea to use small padlocks. I like cable runs better than chains but use both. I dont like cable instead of chain. It seems to stiff to me.
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Old 02-09-2008, 10:42 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
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chain set ups

What do you anchor the chain to? I'd anchoring to car axles hammered into the ground. Didn't somebody else a while back have a smiliar thread? Old Fort, or somebody?
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Old 02-10-2008, 02:12 AM   #7 (permalink)
 

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we use the chain set ups but our chains aren't a big as that one in the picture is. That chain is HUGE in my opinion ours are small and light but a strong
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Old 03-08-2008, 04:38 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefamily
What do you anchor the chain to? I'd anchoring to car axles hammered into the ground. Didn't somebody else a while back have a smiliar thread? Old Fort, or somebody?
Most people use car axles. I use solid steel 6ft fence posts cemented into the ground.

Msmith, the chain pictured is indeed too-large. It was used to prove a point. I use 1/4" chain.
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Old 03-28-2008, 09:20 PM   #9 (permalink)
 

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Chain for the dog and the best, by 'the possibility of moving more'
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Old 05-02-2008, 01:14 AM   #10 (permalink)
 
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does anybody worry about poisonous snakes? iguess its unlikely one would go too a dog instead of slither away unoticed, i dunno, i dont like leaving my dog outside, im sure as he gets older ill have to, he already can maneuver out of the 4 ft fenced in area i made, and its by no means shabby, hes a freakin magician
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Old 05-02-2008, 02:38 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Chain information...

A 5\16" chain is too large for any dog and causes unnecessary strain. If you have a problem with your dogs breaking their chain, increase the grade of the chain, not the size of it.

A grade 30, 5\16" chain has a working load limit of 1,900lbs and weighs 0.924lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 9.24lbs.

A grade 43, 1\4" chain has a working load limit of 2,600lbs and weighs 0.65lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 6.5lbs.

A grade 70, 1\4" chain has a working load limit of 3,150lbs and weighs 0.67lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 6.7lbs.

A grade 80, 9\32" chain has a working load limit of 3,500lbs and weighs 0.72lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 7.2lbs.

A grade 100, 9\32" chain has a working load limit of 4,300lbs and weighs 0.72lbs per foot. A ten foot chain would weigh 7.2lbs.

The higher the grade, the stronger and more durable the material is. If you buy the chain at a hardware store, it will be marked by grade.

A grade 30 chain is silver in color, grade 43 is a little darker and looks to sparkle, grade 70 is originally a gold color, but after wear, it turns the same color as grade 43, both grade 80 and grade 100 chains are black in color.

Depending on the manufacturer, some may be stamped with 3, 30 or 300 for grade 30, 4, 43 or 430 for grade 43, 7, 70 or 700 for grade 70, 8, 80 or 800 for grade 80, 10, 100 or 1000 for grade 100; though many manufacturers do not.

Grade 30 (Proof Coil Chain): General purpose, low carbon steel chain. Used in a wide range of applications. Not to be used in overhead lifting.

Grade 43 (High Test Chain): A high carbon steel chain widely used in industry, construction, agricultural and lumbering operations. Not to be used in overhead lifting.

Grade 70 (Transport Chain): A high quality, high strength carbon steel chain used for load securement. Not to be used in overhead lifting.

Grade 80 (Alloy Chain): Premium quality, high strength alloy chain, heat treated, used in a variety of sling and tie down applications. For overhead lifting applications, only Alloy Chain should be used.

Grade 100 (Alloy Chain): Premium quality, highest strength alloy chain, heat treated, used in a variety of sling and tie down applications. For overhead lifting applications, only Alloy Chain should be used.
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Old 05-02-2008, 09:02 AM   #12 (permalink)
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damn, that's a lot of chain knowledge, lol
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Old 05-02-2008, 02:34 PM   #13 (permalink)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by intensive
does anybody worry about poisonous snakes? iguess its unlikely one would go too a dog instead of slither away unoticed, i dunno, i dont like leaving my dog outside, im sure as he gets older ill have to, he already can maneuver out of the 4 ft fenced in area i made, and its by no means shabby, hes a freakin magician

we really don't have poisonous snakes around my area... i don't live near the woods but my parents do... and yes they worry about it a lot... but luckly my dad is a zoologist so he knows what to do... i heard of snakes going after pups but not adults unless the dog goes after it...
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Old 05-10-2008, 02:56 AM   #14 (permalink)
 

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suggestion to figgy

no offence but your dog is gonna chew through that cable and be running the neighborhood. i can say this because i have done this and my boy tank chewed straite through the cable. so you might wanna go with a cable hooked to one tree to another using that cable for a runner and have better chances in keeping your dog secure.
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Old 05-20-2008, 10:21 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSDBulldog
I've had bad luck with cables. They tangle easily- and when knots form, it can erode the protective coating, causing the cable to eventually rust and snap (Not to mention, destructive dogs will chew right through them). Again, this is why checking your set-ups daily is important.

The cheap hardware store-bought cable tie outs come with are not appropriate for most dogs; one good tug and they'll pop right off. If you do go with a cable set-up, go the full mile and head out to your local hardware store .

I have had bad luck as well. I have had to replace chains and cables tri-annually! I have one cable that I have been using for about 3 1/2 years now, it's awesome. It's pretty thick, high quality, and it's coated with a polymer that isn't showing any ware yet. Problem is that I only bought one, I can't for the life of me remember where I bought it. We have one on a chain, we hate the pet chain, it just wasn't built for a pit. And we have on another cable, he constantly gets tangled up in it. That one cable has yet to get tangled. I use the fence posts to wrap around and fasten, giving the dogs 180 degrees. I'd like to give them 360 but they wrap the cables around the post over and over until they only have a foot of length left. Note: I left them outside for half an hour, one on a post, he wrapped around it and next thing I know I have an aco at my door! My fault, shame on me. I've tried a variety of steaks and they either get bent in half or ripped out of the ground, keep in mind the ground in AZ is very hard. We're doing okay with them up against the fence, had to line the bottom with bricks, bricks and more bricks though... Just wish I could find more of those really good cables! Please, to the nooB's, build you dog a shelter b4 chaining, standing out in the sun sucks after a while.
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