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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as many of you might know, I'm going to be getting a female Chocolate Lab next month, and with all of the facts I have learned on here about dog food, I am looking for some advice on what to feed my girl. A little history... I had a female chocolate lab from the same parents as my new dog a few years ago. I fed her large breed puppy food up to a year old, and then large breed adult food after a year old, and never had any ill-effects from doing so. I always fed kibble (raw is not an option where I live, would break the bank) I began by feeding Iams and then switched to Kirkland Signature (found out on here it's actually pretty good for kibble), then Bullet developed an allergy to the Kirkland Signature and I switched him back to Iams (mini chunks) and have no issues now. I'm not planning on switching him away from the Iams because it's working very well for him and his allergies.

I was always taught to feed large breed dog food to any large breeds, so that's what I have always done. But after being on this forum, I realize that pitbulls are not considered large breed, but would a Lab be considered large breed? I have read that sometimes the protein levels in large breed puppy food, or any puppy food at that, are too high and can cause joint problems later on in life. I have also seen some people say that they feed adult food from puppyhood.

What would be the best thing to do for my girl to ensure proper growth and development?

1) Feed adult food (either the Iams I feed Bullet, or Kirkland Signature)
2) Feed Large Breed puppy food and then Large breed adult after 1 year old
3) Feed non-large-breed puppy food and then regular adult food after 1 year old

Please keep in mind that my options are limited due to where I live, and although I would love to, feeding raw is not an option as it is waaaaaaay too expensive to do so. I realize that Iams is not the greatest, but with limited food options and Bullet's allergies, it's the only thing I've found so far that will work. The Kirkland Signature is pretty much my only other option without literally giving my arm and leg for a bag of dog food that's only slightly better quality. We don't have good foods like Blue Buffalo or anything similar anywhere on the island, and shipping costs more than the bag of food if I were to order anything. Thanks in advance! :)
 

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English Dogge Yard
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Well i have always fed high protein diets to any dogs i have owned including APBT's, APBT mixes and the Bandogge i currently have. I have always had excellent results in high protein diets regardless of all the negativity you may hear about doing so. Its all about moderation, activity and keeping hydrated.. Naturally, knowing your dog.

There are several places in Anchorage that sell Orijen and Evo, though im not entirely sure if thats even possible for you since im unsure where Kodiak is in terms of distance, another option if your willing is ordering food and having it shipped to you. Many reputable places online will have deals year round on excellent dog foods, many give deals if you chose to order in bulk. Without knowing your own situation though, not sure if thats possible.

I would HIGHLY stay away from Iams for more than one reason, fillers, horrible food quality and is in no way shape or form ideal for working breeds, which since you mentioned you would be duck hunting i would recommend a higher quality and a higher protein source for her.

Between the two, i would recommend Kirkland over Iams. Better quality and ingredients.

Does any place sell Orijen, Evo, TOTW, or anything remotely similar to these?

EDIT: Labs are not considered large dogs, although i have seen 110+ pound labs down here i question their strains. I would feed regular puppy and adult food.
 

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try grain-free food
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Well i have always fed high protein diets to any dogs i have owned including APBT's, APBT mixes and the Bandogge i currently have. I have always had excellent results in high protein diets regardless of all the negativity you may hear about doing so. Its all about moderation, activity and keeping hydrated.. Naturally, knowing your dog.

There are several places in Anchorage that sell Orijen and Evo, though im not entirely sure if thats even possible for you since im unsure where Kodiak is in terms of distance, another option if your willing is ordering food and having it shipped to you. Many reputable places online will have deals year round on excellent dog foods, many give deals if you chose to order in bulk. Without knowing your own situation though, not sure if thats possible.

I would HIGHLY stay away from Iams for more than one reason, fillers, horrible food quality and is in no way shape or form ideal for working breeds, which since you mentioned you would be duck hunting i would recommend a higher quality and a higher protein source for her.

Between the two, i would recommend Kirkland over Iams. Better quality and ingredients.

Does any place sell Orijen, Evo, TOTW, or anything remotely similar to these?

EDIT: Labs are not considered large dogs, although i have seen 110+ pound labs down here i question their strains. I would feed regular puppy and adult food.
Anchorage is quite a ways away from me... I'm in Kodiak which is an island, so shipping is not a good option even if it's within Alaska. No deals for us Alaskans, especially Kodiakans... lol. (Just for fun, go to Google maps and in the get directions section, type Kodiak, AK to Anchorage, AK, you'll see where it is. :)) I've looked into shipping a few times at many different websites, and none of them will offer good shipping options to Alaska because of the weight. The price for shipping is either equal to or more than the price of the food itself.

I know Iams isn't all that great, but it's the only thing I can feed Bullet with his allergies, oddly enough. He had horrible anal gland issues a while ago, and the Iams is the only thing I've found that doesn't make them uhh... constantly produce, I'll save the nasty details. Maybe someday if I'm brave enough to switch his food and see if the nastiness comes back, I might, but I really don't want to deal with that disgusting constant mess again...

There is a feed store here that was only a livestock feed store, but I just heard that they're carrying some dog food now too, so I think I'm going to check that out and see what they have.
 

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I have the exact opposite opinion on protein and do not feed over 30% and instead will increase the fat if needed. There are many reasons why I do not like high protein but I will keep it simple by saying I don't like it! Ok I have a head ache bare with me!

Kirkland is a great food I feed my entire kennel that and do not have any issues. I do have a few dogs that need grain free and I feed TOTW or Kirkland also carries a grain free food you can try.
 

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English Dogge Yard
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I have the exact opposite opinion on protein and do not feed over 30% and instead will increase the fat if needed. There are many reasons why I do not like high protein but I will keep it simple by saying I don't like it! Ok I have a head ache bare with me!

Kirkland is a great food I feed my entire kennel that and do not have any issues. I do have a few dogs that need grain free and I feed TOTW or Kirkland also carries a grain free food you can try.
And it seems to be just that, either your for it or against it. Not many people are in the middle area, to each their own.
 

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The whole protein thing is a myth and really it's going to very from dog to dog. If your pup start's to come down on the pasterns or begins to knuckle over then lowering protein can help to correct the problem. It will very from dog to dog and genetics also play a huge role in these problems. I feed my dog's EVO red meat's which is 42% protein/ grain free. They do well on it I also give my pups sure grow 100 to help them through the developmental stages they go through to keep the pasterns nice and upright. The biggest thing you need to understand is what works for one dog may not work for another. You make adjustments based on the dog's needs.

Kirkland is a good feed and reasonably priced especially for a kennel operation with multiple dog's to feed. I know several working dog kennels who feed Kirkland.

I have been feeding EVO since Bogart was a pup he has never had any issues and next to Orijen it's one of the highest protein feeds on the market.
 

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English Dogge Yard
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The whole protein thing is a myth and really it's going to very from dog to dog. If your pup start's to come down on the pasterns or begins to knuckle over then lowering protein can help to correct the problem. It will very from dog to dog and genetics also play a huge role in these problems. I feed my dog's EVO red meat's which is 42% protein/ grain free. They do well on it I also give my pups sure grow 100 to help them through the developmental stages they go through to keep the pasterns nice and upright. The biggest thing you need to understand is what works for one dog may not work for another. You make adjustments based on the dog's needs.

Kirkland is a good feed and reasonably priced especially for a kennel operation with multiple dog's to feed. I know several working dog kennels who feed Kirkland.

I have been feeding EVO since Bogart was a pup he has never had any issues and next to Orijen it's one of the highest protein feeds on the market.
:goodpost::clap: i've never really fed anything under 34% with i think at one point 32% several years ago. What im feeding is 38%.
 

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Well I feed lower protein because there is research that is new that links higher protein diets can cause kidney issues so I just steer clear of it. With all the new really high protein diets they started to see some issues pop up. I always say you can find a study to back just about anything up so really it goes down to personal choice.
 

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I agree Lisa I never argue about dog foods people can feed what they want. From my exp I have never had any issues. In human's meat consumption in excess can lead to kidney issues over a period of time. Your kidney's have to work harder to break down the protein. But with dog's it's a little bit different they are carnivore's so the way they process and break down protein in the body/digestive track is different than humans. There is a lot of conflicting information about the high protein in dog's argument. I have seen studies from both sides and I stand by the fact that every dog is different and react's differently to different diet's and feeds. There are also some breeds/dogs that are genetically disposed to joint/bone issues. Pup's also go through some funky stages during their growth period so you may need to make adjustments along the way if you notice any issues. But whatever works for your dog's is what matters. I know people who can feed their dog's garbage food and they do well on it no skin problems nothing LOL. If I fed that same garbage to one of mine they would be itching like crazy hair falling out everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the input everyone. I've decided I'm going to try switching Bullet back to the Kirkland, so cross your fingers that we don't have any nasty explosions... lol :roll: The breeder I'm getting the pup from is starting them on Kirkland puppy, so that's definitely what I'm going to feed her at first. The Cost Savers store here (kinda like a mini Costco) has just started carrying the Kirkland puppy, and other than that the only Kirkland foods they have are lamb & rice or chicken & rice. They are not consistent in keeping everything in stock, so that's kinda irritating, but I'll just make sure I always have an extra bag just in case. I'm really hoping that I don't have the anal gland issues with Bullet when I switch him back, but I think I'm going to try the chicken and rice formula since I was feeding the lamb and rice before, and that's when the problems started. *crosses fingers* At least it's summer now and he can spend more time outside in his pen if we do have issues... lol.

And another question.... at what age should I switch her to adult food? Generally I've heard 1 year old, but have also heard that some feed puppy food longer and some shorter... what do you guys think?
 

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English Dogge Yard
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Thanks for the input everyone. I've decided I'm going to try switching Bullet back to the Kirkland, so cross your fingers that we don't have any nasty explosions... lol :roll: The breeder I'm getting the pup from is starting them on Kirkland puppy, so that's definitely what I'm going to feed her at first. The Cost Savers store here (kinda like a mini Costco) has just started carrying the Kirkland puppy, and other than that the only Kirkland foods they have are lamb & rice or chicken & rice. They are not consistent in keeping everything in stock, so that's kinda irritating, but I'll just make sure I always have an extra bag just in case. I'm really hoping that I don't have the anal gland issues with Bullet when I switch him back, but I think I'm going to try the chicken and rice formula since I was feeding the lamb and rice before, and that's when the problems started. *crosses fingers* At least it's summer now and he can spend more time outside in his pen if we do have issues... lol.

And another question.... at what age should I switch her to adult food? Generally I've heard 1 year old, but have also heard that some feed puppy food longer and some shorter... what do you guys think?
This is another question that will probably yield mixed answers and results. Personally, 11 - 13 months i switch to adult. This is probably much earlier than most will do for their own rightful reasons, though again of all the years of owning dogs i've never ran into any problems.
 

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I think I switch at about 10 months or when the puppy is eating a normal amount of food but are starting to pack on fat from the puppy food, then it is time to go to adult. I have never had much luck with the Lamb and rice and the chicken has always been good with my dogs.
 
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