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Discussion Starter #1
My boy Romeo was a rescue so his age is an estimate but according to the vet hes between 8 months and a year old, I want to get him fixed as he is just going to be a pet and i dont want any accidents, his head measures 19 inches and he is 20" tall, he weighs 48 pounds(very lean and cut) so I expect him to fill out a bit more but I don't want him to end up tall and lanky like it says is a possibility, should I be waiting to neuter him or do you think this is a good age? I just don't want to stop him from growing how he should

thanks
Nick
 

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I didn't neuter Kangol until he was 3 for my own personal reasons (never humped anything a day in his life to this day and he is 6 now, never marked, never tried to run off etc). I don't see a problem with waiting as long as you are a responsible owner.
 

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I didn't neuter Kangol until he was 3 for my own personal reasons (never humped anything a day in his life to this day and he is 6 now, never marked, never tried to run off etc). I don't see a problem with waiting as long as you are a responsible owner.
Agreed. As long as you are very careful and responsible with your dog, there's nothing wrong with waiting. Responsibility will mean always on a leash or well-restrained when not in the house, and always being watched when outside, so no females can come and "solicit" him. lol. There are many different opinions on this, but I honestly feel if you are responsible there's nothing wrong with it, and I have heard it probably will help him fill out a little better.
 

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Actually, my understanding is that neutered dogs tend to be a bit on the larger side than un-neutered dogs. That is what I was told when I looked into the matter.

Loki is not neutered and I have absolutely no intention of breeding him ever. It was my husband's preference not to neuter him and he has never humped anything either. He is going to be 4 in June of this year and I am pleased with how he turned out. He is an indoor/crate dog however and does not have unlimited amount of time spent outdoors.
 

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Where is he a "rescue" from? A shelter or just some random person? If he is a shelter rescue he should be fixed asap. If he is a year old it is safe to neuter now as he is matured. Not necessarily done growing but he will be fine. Men usually have the issues with neutering and after owning both fixed and unfixed males I will always neuter at least by a year old. Its personal preference so do what you will. You ask a neuter question and you are going to always get different opinions. Some will neuter, some won't, some will get testicular cancer, some won't, some males maybe more aggressive intact, some won't. Pit bulls are a breed that seem less likely to be fixed just by ignorance and what people perceive as cruel. Hence the over population problem in shelters. Accidents can still happen responsible or not. If he is unpapered and you won't be showing him than neutering is the way to go.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Yes he is an actual rescue from a shelter and he is not papered so he will never be bred or shown he is just my pet, I have no issue getting him neutered and definitely will be getting him fixed that is not even a question, my question is just whether I should do that now or in say, 4-6 months from now. Running away is not a possibility, he doesnt hump anything or mark in the house, but I would like to have him fixed but I hear about dogs growing taller and lankier if fixed too early and I would like to avoid that, but at about 9 months, could that still be an issue???
 

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Yes he is an actual rescue from a shelter and he is not papered so he will never be bred or shown he is just my pet, I have no issue getting him neutered and definitely will be getting him fixed that is not even a question, my question is just whether I should do that now or in say, 4-6 months from now. Running away is not a possibility, he doesnt hump anything or mark in the house, but I would like to have him fixed but I hear about dogs growing taller and lankier if fixed too early and I would like to avoid that, but at about 9 months, could that still be an issue???
I just don't think the shelter you got him from would be happy in knowing he wasn't fixed yet. On that note.......you said he is anywhere between 8 months to a year old? right? How long ago did you adopt him? If you know for a fact he is a year old then I would do it now. I know some very reputable breeders of other kinds of dogs who have a spay/neuter contract between the ages of 12 to 14 months so the dogs can mature. Sounds like you are responsible in your decisions for him. Good for you for neutering him :)

Can you post up some pics of him?? I have seen some males at 10 months who have huge heads and are filled out well already.....
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
yeahh definitely wanna get him neutered no need to take chances, just wanna make sure hes matured enough I like to try and research before I do anything ya know...here are some pics
 

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Discussion Starter #9
his head seems pretty big and his body is toned I just dont wanna jump the gun ya know i overthink everything lol
 

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yeahh definitely wanna get him neutered no need to take chances, just wanna make sure hes matured enough I like to try and research before I do anything ya know...here are some pics
I totally here ya on the research and you are doing the right thing by coming here!! :) This place has taught me alot. I knew ALOT coming here but i have doubled my knowledge now lol! I over think things to so I know the feeling LOL! Your pics are small so it's hard to get a good look at him but whether you do it now or two months from now it won't really matter. JMO
 

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i have huge pics of him in the bloodline section its oneve the first threads you can see them there idk why now theyre coming out small lol but yeah I think its worth just doing it sooner than later so his recovery can be over with and the stress over the whole situation will be gone
 

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i have huge pics of him in the bloodline section its oneve the first threads you can see them there idk why now theyre coming out small lol but yeah I think its worth just doing it sooner than later so his recovery can be over with and the stress over the whole situation will be gone
I will check them out there then! Hope you stay around and become a regular as I have! This place is filled with great people and info! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
got the pics bigger and took some new ones today so there is somewhat of an idea of where his body is right now, I think he is matured enough to neuter now and not have a big effect on his body but if anyone disagrees please give input!! thanks
 

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On the positive side, neutering male dogs
• eliminates the small risk (probably <1%) of dying from testicular cancer
• reduces the risk of non-cancerous prostate disorders
• reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
• may possibly reduce the risk of diabetes (data inconclusive)

On the negative side, neutering male dogs
• if done before maturity, increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer) by a factor of 3.8; this is a
common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.
• increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6; this is a common cancer and
major cause of death in some breeds
• triples the risk of hypothyroidism
• increases the risk of geriatric cognitive impairment
• triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with it the many associated health
problems associated with obesity
• quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
• doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers
• increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
• increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations

The traditional spay/neuter age of six months as well as the modern practice of pediatric spay/neuter appear
to predispose dogs to health risks that could otherwise be avoided by waiting until the dog is physically
mature, or (perhaps in the case of many male dogs) foregoing it altogether unless medically necessary.

REFERENCES
1 Burrow R, Batchelor D, Cripps P. Complications observed during and after ovariohysterectomy of 142
bitches at a veterinary teaching hospital.Vet Rec. 2005 Dec 24-31;157(26):829-33.
2 Pollari FL, Bonnett BN, Bamsey, SC, Meek, AH, Allen, DG (1996) Postoperative complications of elective
surgeries in dogs and cats determined by examining electronic and medical records. Journal of the
American Veterinary Medical Association 208, 1882-1886
3 Dorn AS, Swist RA. (1977) Complications of canine ovariohysterectomy. Journal of the American Animal
Hospital Association 13, 720-724
4 Can Vet J. 1996 November; 37(11): 672-678. Evaluation of postoperative complications following elective
surgeries of dogs and cats at private practices using computer records, Pollari FL, Bonnett BN
5 Pollari FL, Bonnett BN, Bamsey SC, Meek AH, Allen DG. Postoperative complications of elective
surgeries in dogs and cats determined by examining electronic and paper medical records. J Am Vet Med
Assoc. 1996 Jun 1;208(11):1882-6
6 Teske E, Naan EC, van Dijk EM, van Garderen E, Schalken JA. Canine prostate carcinoma:
epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2002 Nov 29;197(1-
2):251-5.
7 Sorenmo KU, Goldschmidt M, Shofer F, Ferrocone J. Immunohistochemical characterization of canine
prostatic carcinoma and correlation with castration status and castration time. Vet Comparative Oncology.
2003 Mar; 1 (1): 48
8 Weaver, AD. Vet Rec. 1981; 109, 71-75.
9 Cohen D, Reif JS, Brodey RS, et al: Epidemiological analysis of the most prevalent sites and types of
canine neoplasia observed in a veterinary hospital. Cancer Res 34:2859-2868, 1974
10 http://www.vet.purdue.edu//epi/golden_retriever_final22.pdf
11 Handbook of Small Animal Practice, 3rd ed
12 Hayes HM Jr, Pendergrass TW. Canine testicular tumors: epidemiologic features of 410 dogs. Int J
Cancer 1976 Oct 15;18(4):482-7
13 Ru G, Terracini B, Glickman LT. Vet J 1998 Jul; 156(1):31-9
 

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im surprised the shelters let them go without being neutered, ours have that done before the dog even goes home. I was always told best after 6 months to get them fixed , at his age i would think its fine they usually grow upwards the 1 st year and he is probably pretty much done growing up now , will be filling out and neutering wont stop him from filling out :)
 

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im surprised the shelters let them go without being neutered, ours have that done before the dog even goes home. I was always told best after 6 months to get them fixed , at his age i would think its fine they usually grow upwards the 1 st year and he is probably pretty much done growing up now , will be filling out and neutering wont stop him from filling out :)
Yeah that surprised me too
 

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Discussion Starter #17
yeah I have heard from alot of people that most shelters will have them fixed before they leave but this wasnt much of a shelter it was just animal control it didnt seem like they cared much whether he was adopted or put down its pretty sad
 

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WOW a shelter not requiring a neuter/spay is unusual. When I got my girl, they gave me 60 days to get her spayed or they would take her back. They offered discounted placed and they were on my back calling me for proof. I told them the place they sent me wasn't acceptable. (I'm finicky about my choice). She was done by someone I felt comfortable with. Beastley, my pit, he looks like yours but he's 70lbs, turned 2 in December and he is getting fixed April 12th. My husband was totally against it but when my grand niece/nephew came to spend the weekend he tried to mount them. It never happened before and he made the comment, "I think he needs to be neutered." It took me two seconds to call and make an appointment. My mastiff is unaltered.
 
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