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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

This is my first time posting and I already have search google as well as this forum to see if anybody had a problem like mine. So my lovely pit mix George is a bundle of energy and my walks were not doing enough to get him even remotely tired so I decided to try him with my bike. I've had both my Schnauzer mix and Rottie ride with me on the bike and it went well, George however is not so good. I can walk him along side the bike and he has no problem with it, but when I get on the bike and start moving he loses it. He tries to attack the front wheel and only the front wheel and to make it worse he SCREAMS while doing it. I've had people coming running out to the street multiple times looking for this injured dog only to see my terrorist going after the tire. He wears a muzzle now when we ride and that of course makes people assume that he is viscous but it's the safest way to ride. He seems to actually enjoy the bike ride. Recently I've starting using a trike so that when I need to correct him I don't have to battle to keep the bike from falling on me. Whether on the bike or trike I have the leash set in a way that makes it so that he can't get close enough to the front tire to damage it or get stuck in it. He's gotten a lot better now but if we pass an aggressively barking dog or something that spooks him he will go after the tire again. I've tried to roller blade with him as well and he goes after the front tire of that too. I now have a scar on my elbow from that. Does anyone have a suggestion for what I can do to stop him from doing this? He doesn't do it as often anymore but we also go up and down the same section of street everyday. He loves getting the chance to run but his issue with the front tire is keeping him from enjoying the ride.

Any help would be appreciated.
 

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These animals have super high prey drive most like to chase things moving. Tires are just one of those things if he is not getting a sufficient enough amount of exercise due to this he may have way to much pent up energy and is seeking an output. I'd suggest either making or buying a Spring Pole or Flirt pole to re direct this energy. Sounds like hed prefer a tire toy at the end of his. Many posts about flirt poles and spring poles.
 

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you can also try to put him on a treadmill for a bit to tire him out and then work on desensitizing him to the bike. I agree with the above though, his drive is kicking in so you need to tire him out to be able to get him to listen, I do think it would be possible to get him used to it eventually it will just take time and patience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
These animals have super high prey drive most like to chase things moving. Tires are just one of those things if he is not getting a sufficient enough amount of exercise due to this he may have way to much pent up energy and is seeking an output. I'd suggest either making or buying a Spring Pole or Flirt pole to re direct this energy. Sounds like hed prefer a tire toy at the end of his. Many posts about flirt poles and spring poles.
I have tried a flirt pole but he had no interest in it. It I hold things in my hand he will run at it but once it is on a flirt pole he loses interest. He also has limited interest in balls so fetch has been a failure. I've been wanted to build a carpet mill, but my skill with tools is limited. I've been waiting for a few months for that. Like I said it's only the front wheel, when he is trailing behind the bike he has no interest in the back wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would like to thank everyone for their input, but I have another question. When my dog does get over excited it ranges from him trying to chase down the tire and then once we stop he nips it and I can tell him to leave it and he will back up a step but won't let it move all the way to full on attacking the front wheel. The full on attacks were frequent in the beginning so he was muzzled all the time back then for fear of him breaking a tooth or possibly his jaw if he held on while we were moving.

My question for you all now is, how should I correct him?

I have tried to jog with him before we get on the trike and that does help a bit but if there is a cat the crosses the street or dogs barking aggressively at a fence he will get excited and then go after the tire again.
 

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Are you opposed to seeking help from a trainer that uses a balanced training method? One who might possibly recommend an e collar? When his safety, as well as yours, is at risk, a couple well-timed static corrections may do the trick. Strictly to be used under a trainer's advice. I would also recommend a Walky-Dog bike leash, as it provides some relief from pulling you over, and they make one that attaches to the rear of the bike, instead of under the seat.

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I think a ecollar might work as well BUT like Indie said you must use a trainer. You can really screw your dog up on an ecollar. Dogs don't know where the correction is coming from and could redirect and he is already redirecting so it maybe difficult to get him to understand and stop that redirection if you're experimenting it without the stimulation. But worth a shot with ale one who knows what they are doing.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think a ecollar might work as well BUT like Indie said you must use a trainer. You can really screw your dog up on an ecollar. Dogs don't know where the correction is coming from and could redirect and he is already redirecting so it maybe difficult to get him to understand and stop that redirection if you're experimenting it without the stimulation. But worth a shot with ale one who knows what they are doing.

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I agree
Are you opposed to seeking help from a trainer that uses a balanced training method? One who might possibly recommend an e collar? When his safety, as well as yours, is at risk, a couple well-timed static corrections may do the trick. Strictly to be used under a trainer's advice. I would also recommend a Walky-Dog bike leash, as it provides some relief from pulling you over, and they make one that attaches to the rear of the bike, instead of under the seat.

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I'm not opposed to seeking help from a trainer, unfortunately I can't really afford one right now. I work at a vet's office and we have a trainer on staff but she only works with pre aggression. My vet also recommended a veterinary behaviorist since his fear aggression keeps him from being fully examined. Until I get a raise or a second job I won't be able to afford to hire a trainer, which is something that really bothers me.
 

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Best I can recommend right now is to avoid biking, and find a different energy outlet, while you get a good ol' training manual, and work on his fear aggression yourself. A lot of it can be addressed by having him associate the things he's afraid of with positive things. But, a poor temperament is a poor temperament, and you may not make any progress on your own. Won't hurt to give it a shot, though. Remember: the dog you pay attention to is the dog you will get.

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Best I can recommend right now is to avoid biking, and find a different energy outlet, while you get a good ol' training manual, and work on his fear aggression yourself. A lot of it can be addressed by having him associate the things he's afraid of with positive things. But, a poor temperament is a poor temperament, and you may not make any progress on your own. Won't hurt to give it a shot, though. Remember: the dog you pay attention to is the dog you will get.

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Thanks for the advice. What training manual would you recommend? I was thinking about getting some of the Leerburg training things.
I haven't been taking him out on the bike, but instead have been allowing the boys more time supervised in the yard. It's not enough for George but for now it will have to due. I took him on bike ride today though and he was really good! At one point he was chasing the wheel but when I stopped he sniffed it and left it alone ( I sprayed something that doesn't smell very good on it). Things went well and he even listened after a cat ran across our path. Had to cut the ride short when some very stupid lady left her door open and let her little Chihuahua run out. This little sh*t ran to us like he was on the attack, I had to pick up my dog's head and hold it to my chest as I yelled at her to get her dog. I realize now I probable should have kicked it. She made no move to control her dog as I'm yelling at her. She had the nerve to actually watch me ride away with him while he was still loose in her front yard. She was acting like I was in the wrong. Would I have been in the wrong if he had bitten him or if he had gotten hit by a car as he came running into the road? So I've learned a new spanish phrase, "obtenga su perro," which means "get your dog!" I simply don't trust George with small dogs, too much to risk and it takes no time for serious damage to happen to something so small.
 

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My lady's dog used to be the same way with skateboards. Maybe that sound was confusing, or the way people moved on them, but once I took him out riding a few time he started to understand that they aren't a threat, or food, or whatever was going on in his little head, and now he pulls me around like a proper gentleman.

As to the other thing- it wouldn't be your FAULT if your dog chomped another animal like that, but obviously you should get in the strong habit of scanning the streets ahead of you and be ready to pick him up ASAP. Being in the right doesn't make the situation any more pleasant if your standing over someone's mortally wounded "baby", you know? You could blame the neighbor, the other dog, but believe me, those toy breeds don't have a body to match their bravery (or is it bluff? Haha). My one year old male killed a big possum last week, a bigger, scrappier animal than a lot of house dogs, and it didn't take but 30 seconds. Just saying, it's up to us to keep our dogs in line with the whole 'thou shall not kill nobody's grandma's dog' part of the commandments.
 

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Ps. Must have missed the last part of your post. You get it.

Pps. Bikes and dogs are a great combo, an I hope you figure it out.

Ppps. Yell "ahora!" after the get your dog part. Or "el lo matara!"
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ps. Must have missed the last part of your post. You get it.

Pps. Bikes and dogs are a great combo, an I hope you figure it out.

Ppps. Yell "ahora!" after the get your dog part. Or "el lo matara!"
I hope that I figure it out because I would love to have him :pupruns: like he seems to crave so much. He also behaves much better in the evenings when he's run with the bike that morning. I would like to be able to tire him out before we have to go places like the vet. I'm not so fond of the idea of having to sedate him with Ace or whatever or even have to physically overpower him to do blood draws and vaccines. Last time he had vaccines done he peed, expressed his anal glands and bled all over the room. He had bit his lip while muzzled and that sucker didn't want to stop bleeding. I would love to see how it goes when he's nice and tired. Less energy to resist is the goal.

I will remember my little Spanish phrases for next time.
 
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