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Discussion Starter #1
What would you call their colors? I know they are brindle, but they are so different colorwise.

Ginger, the darker girl, her colors in the photo looks spot on.

Xoey's color is not as red in person, for some reason I just can't get the color in photos right. The only thing I can compare her color to is how "ghost" morphs work in snakes, which makes the snake look like it's in "blue"(about to shed) all the time, like they are washed out.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/eccjh3f0vfn02xg/DSCN1180.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/kzhuc5mjaty34wn/DSCN1184.JPG?dl=0
 

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Gorgeous dogs. I love brindle, I own a brindle mutt myself.

Brindle can be incredibly variable, so you can have two brindle dogs that look absolutely nothing alike.

The way the dilute gene works, is basically everything that would normally be black on a dog turns a bluish gray color.
There's also liver pigmented dogs ('red nose', in our breed) where everything that should be black turns to a coppery red/brown color.
And there's diluted liver (Aka Isabella or Champagne) where the dog has genes for both liver and blue pigmentation and the dog looks like a blend of the two.

Sorry, I know the question has been answered already, but I wanted to add on. Color genetics are friggin cool.
 

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Gorgeous dogs. I love brindle, I own a brindle mutt myself.

Brindle can be incredibly variable, so you can have two brindle dogs that look absolutely nothing alike.

The way the dilute gene works, is basically everything that would normally be black on a dog turns a bluish gray color.
There's also liver pigmented dogs ('red nose', in our breed) where everything that should be black turns to a coppery red/brown color.
And there's diluted liver (Aka Isabella or Champagne) where the dog has genes for both liver and blue pigmentation and the dog looks like a blend of the two.

Sorry, I know the question has been answered already, but I wanted to add on. Color genetics are friggin cool.
So it's very much like I thought, so are they Recessive, Co-Dominance, or Incomplete Dominance?
 

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Here's a good link that would explain it better than I ever could- Dog Coat Colour Genetics

I love genetics, I'm just absolute crap at explaining things lol.
So Brindle is recessive, that's cool to know, but I was wondering about the "Blue Fawn"... ;)

Recessive means that both parents have to carry the gene, whether they are het (carrier) or **** (showing). Both parents have shared the gene to the offspring, who has two brindle genes on the allele for that trait. :woof:
 

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So Brindle is recessive, that's cool to know, but I was wondering about the "Blue Fawn"... ;)

Recessive means that both parents have to carry the gene, whether they are het (carrier) or **** (showing). Both parents have shared the gene to the offspring, who has two brindle genes on the allele for that trait. :woof:
Oh, my bad. Thought you were asking about brindle.
Blue fawn is recessive. The D locus controls the intensity of eumelanin in the coat. So, Blue is really diluted black and Isabella is really diluted Liver.
The thing that trips people up though, is the fact that the D locus only controls black and liver.

Fawn is diluted red. The I locus controls the intensity of phaomelanin (red) but does not affect eumelanin. Unfortunately, because the I locus was just recently discovered (Phaomelanin was previously thought to be controlled by the C locus) we don't know the alleles.
 

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Oh, my bad. Thought you were asking about brindle.
Blue fawn is recessive. The D locus controls the intensity of eumelanin in the coat. So, Blue is really diluted black and Isabella is really diluted Liver.
The thing that trips people up though, is the fact that the D locus only controls black and liver.

Fawn is diluted red. The I locus controls the intensity of phaomelanin (red) but does not affect eumelanin. Unfortunately, because the I locus was just recently discovered (Phaomelanin was previously thought to be controlled by the C locus) we don't know the alleles.
^^^^^ See you can explain it!! ;) I speak gene geek!! lmao Thank you!! I was just wondering as I have no plans to breed either. Ginger is already fixed and Xoey will be once she's 6 months.
 
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