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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I get the big picture of crate training. My question, is what size kennel to get her? Ive seen the ones with dividers, so i can make the length shorter while shes a pup, and extend it to when she gets older. They have sizes, for example:
Up to 70lbs
Up to 90lbs

etc. From other pit owners, what do you guys recomend, so im not swapping out diff kennels as she grows.

Also, shes 6 weeks, is it too early to start yet? Can she even understand whats going on? My fiance got her chihuahua at 8 weeks, its 11 now. She gets the idea. Goes outside, doesnt go in the house anymore. Not so sure about Dolce since shes so young.

Input and feedback please.
 

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Make sure not to get one to big or be sure to use the divider bc i made the mistake of a too big crate and my dog would relieve himself on one side and stay on the other. if they don't have enough room to do that, they usually hold it for the purpose of not wanting to dirty their living space. I have only had one incident where he had an accident in a smaller kennel, and even then he put his butt up to the side and defecated outside of the crate lol.

They should have enough room to stand up and turn a circle comfortably.
 

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Definitely get a crate for your pups full size, but with a divider. It'll be more expensive (I think mine cost ~70-90 dollars), but it'll save you money in the long run because you won't have to keep buying different sized crates.

Use the divider to give your pup just enough room to turn around in a circle and lay down comfortably. Keep adjusting the divider as your pup grows until you eventually won't need it anymore.

Since your pup is so young, I would start with very small amounts in the crate. Make it easy on yourself and put a blanket in the crate and whenever you see your pup laying down for a nap or getting tired, put them in there so they get used to sleeping in the crate and don't think it's a big deal. After your puppy is done eating, put them in the crate with a toy. When they whine, take them out of the crate and immediately put them on a puppy pad/take them outside, however you're doing it. If they don't go, don't worry about it, put them back in their crate for a little bit longer, and try again in another 5-10 minutes. This will minimize accidents and teach them not to go in their crate.

Eventually you might have to take the blanket out of the crate as they get older because they'll start to chew on it as my boy did. Don't worry about it; they won't care if they have to lay on the plastic tray. My boy is a little over a year and hasn't had a blanket in his crate since he was ~3-4 months and started teething and chewing and destroying anything he could get his mouth on. I could probably throw one in there next time I go out to see how he does with it. *shrug*
 

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Oh, and were you able to see the parents?? The parents can give you an idea of what size crate to get for your pup's adult size. I didn't have that privilege, so I had to come here and give everyone Kane's weight @ 4 months and get everyone's guesses as to how big he would get, LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No i didnt get a chance to see her parents. Im probable, going to go with the up to 70lb one. Do pits usually weight more than that? I dont plan on weight trainig her, or bulking her up or anything special.
 

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American Pit Bull Terriers CAN weigh up to 70lbs, but it's rare. APBTs usually weigh anywhere from 30-65lbs.

Didn't you say in your introduction that she had Razor's Edge lines? That is an American Bully line and they get bigger, 75lbs+. If I were you, I'd go for a 90lb crate.

And that's great that you aren't going to try to bulk her up -- you can never add more muscle than her genetics call for, anyways.
 

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Definitely get a crate for your pups full size, but with a divider. It'll be more expensive (I think mine cost ~70-90 dollars), but it'll save you money in the long run because you won't have to keep buying different sized crates.

Use the divider to give your pup just enough room to turn around in a circle and lay down comfortably. Keep adjusting the divider as your pup grows until you eventually won't need it anymore.

Since your pup is so young, I would start with very small amounts in the crate. Make it easy on yourself and put a blanket in the crate and whenever you see your pup laying down for a nap or getting tired, put them in there so they get used to sleeping in the crate and don't think it's a big deal. After your puppy is done eating, put them in the crate with a toy. When they whine, take them out of the crate and immediately put them on a puppy pad/take them outside, however you're doing it. If they don't go, don't worry about it, put them back in their crate for a little bit longer, and try again in another 5-10 minutes. This will minimize accidents and teach them not to go in their crate.

Eventually you might have to take the blanket out of the crate as they get older because they'll start to chew on it as my boy did. Don't worry about it; they won't care if they have to lay on the plastic tray. My boy is a little over a year and hasn't had a blanket in his crate since he was ~3-4 months and started teething and chewing and destroying anything he could get his mouth on. I could probably throw one in there next time I go out to see how he does with it. *shrug*
:goodpost:
Also don't use the crate as a punishment.And when mine would whine in the crate and I knew they didn't need to use the bathroom,I would just let them whine for a little bit.They need to get used to it.I would keep my crate in the living room so the dog would still feel involved and like part of the family.
 
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