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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my lil Samson will be 5 months old in a few days, ..... he is at around 36lbs. Anyways, for myself i decided to start walking 2 miles at night with my dog......

I had bought him a nice thick padded collar (a lil big on him but fits him) ..... anyways he likes pulling on me....which is fine, i can get him to stop if i wanted to but i dont ....for 2 reasons.

a) forces me to walk faster, and i need the exercise....

and b) because i live in the city, single dad, (los angeles) too many parks wont allow pits. I want to give him a lil exercise that makes him work a tiny but harder.....as he pulls i hear in 2 miles maybe 3 coughs or so from choking himself.

Well today i bought him a padded harness and will try it out soon as i get it in the mail.....

just wanted everyone's opinion on harnesses, adding a lil resistance to his walks .....i am not interested in anything but him being in good shape phisically and mentally. and help myself in the process.

here s a cool pic i took last night us walking the 2 miles (he s pretty shapely)

 

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Kelevra
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So my lil Samson will be 5 months old in a few days, ..... he is at around 36lbs. Anyways, for myself i decided to start walking 2 miles at night with my dog......

I had bought him a nice thick padded collar (a lil big on him but fits him) ..... anyways he likes pulling on me....which is fine, i can get him to stop if i wanted to but i dont ....for 2 reasons.

a) forces me to walk faster, and i need the exercise....

and b) because i live in the city, single dad, (los angeles) too many parks wont allow pits. I want to give him a lil exercise that makes him work a tiny but harder.....as he pulls i hear in 2 miles maybe 3 coughs or so from choking himself.

Well today i bought him a padded harness and will try it out soon as i get it in the mail.....

just wanted everyone's opinion on harnesses, adding a lil resistance to his walks .....i am not interested in anything but him being in good shape phisically and mentally. and help myself in the process.

here s a cool pic i took last night us walking the 2 miles (he s pretty shapely)

Hard to see in the pic, but you can make out his shape :)
5 months is a bit too early to add any real weight to any harness, maybe a can of rocks or a piece of a tire to start.. honestly if you start "training" the dog to pull on a walk, they will get better at that. If its what you enjoy..to be pulled.. then by all means, but maybe now is the time to start mentally training instead of physically training. The power and ability will come, trust.
As an opinion, use two collars. One he can pull with. And one he should know not to pull in..
good luck!
 
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SCRATCHIN
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... If its what you enjoy..to be pulled.. then by all means, but maybe now is the time to start mentally training instead of physically training. The power and ability will come, trust.
As an opinion, use two collars. One he can pull with. And one he should know not to pull in..
good luck!
:goodpost: words of wisdom
 

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Hard to see in the pic, but you can make out his shape :)
5 months is a bit too early to add any real weight to any harness, maybe a can of rocks or a piece of a tire to start.. honestly if you start "training" the dog to pull on a walk, they will get better at that. If its what you enjoy..to be pulled.. then by all means, but maybe now is the time to start mentally training instead of physically training. The power and ability will come, trust.
As an opinion, use two collars. One he can pull with. And one he should know not to pull in..
good luck!
:goodpost: Was going to say pretty much exactly this.
 

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Hard to see in the pic, but you can make out his shape :)
5 months is a bit too early to add any real weight to any harness, maybe a can of rocks or a piece of a tire to start.. honestly if you start "training" the dog to pull on a walk, they will get better at that. If its what you enjoy..to be pulled.. then by all means, but maybe now is the time to start mentally training instead of physically training. The power and ability will come, trust.
As an opinion, use two collars. One he can pull with. And one he should know not to pull in..
good luck!
I believe he was saying only for walking not weight pulling
 

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That's a long walk for a 5 month old. Puppies need to be puppies. Working a dog too early can damage their growth plates and ruin their structure. You may be doing more harm than good. Don't get me wrong I love a well conditioned dog. Key word is Dog not puppy. And "Pits" don't belong at dog parks or parks off leash.

Here's a good read.

APBT conditioning
by Scot E. Dowd Ph.D.
Goals of conditioning
The dictionary defines conditioning as "developing a state of health, readiness, and physical fitness."

The American Pit Bull Terrier is an all around versatile athlete. Thus, conditioning must be directed toward the goal of optimizing versatility.
Ultimately the exemplified APBT combines agility, speed, endurance and strength.

The goals of conditioning are simple
health and well-being are enhanced by daily exercise. Dogs that get out of their crates or kennels once a week are obvious in the show ring. They may appear to be in shape but they are mushy with no real muscle tone.

Enhanced performance- A dog that is conditioned will perform any task better.
Injury reduction- Take a fat dog over a few agility jumps (if they can jump) and before long the joints will suffer, the heart will give out, and the dog will collapse from exhaustion long before a conditioned animal will even feel the workout.

Enhanced beauty - There is nothing more beautiful than a fully conditioned APBT.
The goals of the program are simple; to build strong, well-conditioned dogs who can perform to the best of their ability. Endurance and strength are keys to winning any competition (weight pull, agility, flyball, Conformation etc) and go hand in hand with the physical and mental well-being of the animal. Nothing could be more critical than keeping your dogs healthy and well conditioned. Lean muscle keeps the athletic dog from incurring injuries even when playing in the back yard. Conditioning helps the dog heal more quickly if an injury does occur. When muscles and ligaments are strong and joints are healthy they are prepared to support the whole body through rigorous and intense activity.

If we draw a comparison to athletes the perfect specimen of the APBT might be similar to an Olympic wrestler. There are the powerlifter styles and the sumo wrestler styles, but for the purpose of an all around functional specimen the APBT must be moderate in form and in excellent condition to have maximum versatility of function.

An animal that is carrying excess body fat will break down during intense physical activity. The APBT should at all times, especially in the show ring be presented in a form that speaks of peak conditioning. Even a moderately overweight dog when running agility or even running around a show ring will break down, become fatigued and be injured. Dogs even moderately overweight or underconditioned are comparatively slow and ponderous, they lack the necessary endurance required to sustain physical activity for more than a few minutes. The saddest thing I see, these days, are those "winning show dogs" that start panting after trotting one time around a show ring. Judges that put up out of shape dogs, especially in a working breed like the APBT, do nothing more than show their lack of understanding for what a breed standard is and what the history and functionality of a true APBT stands for. This is a lack of understanding of the history and the working type that the APBT should epitomize. Kudos to judges and competitors who take the time to condition their animals, even a little beyond the sofa.

PUPPIES: up to 18 months at least!!!!
Before we go on, we have to stress a very important point. puppies do not need to be undergoing intense physical training and conditioning. puppies should not be conditioned!!! Treat a puppy like a puppy. They need to learn, be socialized, have fun, play and maybe a bit of moderate exercise. puppies should not be conditioned!! BUT: At the same time all puppies should be getting tons of activity. puppies need a variety of activities in a variety of settings (vaccinations taken into account) so that they will be socialized and used to any environment. Let a puppy mature naturally, let their bones grow straight and true, let their minds become strong and well socialized, let their muscles develop. If you excessively train a puppy it will succeed in only one thing. You will ruin their Conformation, break their spirit, and reduce their full potential as a universal athlete. Don't work hard on a puppy they need time to develop naturally. The goal of a puppy conditioning is to build a solid foundation not over-train and destroy the structure and temperament. We will talk more about a conditioning program for puppies that will ensure they have the best chance at competing in all events and becoming a UKC Superdog!

Here's the link to the full article here on GP.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input guys, I just want to walk him ....no weight pulling nor adding weight to harness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
here are some pics from today at work..bought him 2 bones to keep him busy....although with so many people from work he s always excited to come to work with me.









 

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He looks like a happy little chap! You're fortunate to be able to bring him to work with you. Occasionally I bring mine in with me too.

What I meant is that at his age, if it were my dog, I wouldn't be encouraging him to pull too much on walks. I'd be focusing more on having him be at my side (or at least not pulling) on walks. IMO he doesn't need to pull for two miles at 5 months to be sufficiently exercised. I think the distance is OK but at a steady pace with little or no tension on the lead. Even though you're not adding weight, him pulling you is still resistance training which I don't think is necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sounds like good advice, I will keep that in mind. and he is the happiest dog.....i just dont like leaving him home alone since he is so friendly ....plus i dont listen to my boss hahaha
 

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have you looked into something like this? Premier® Gentle Leader® Headcollar for Dogs - Dog - Web Exclusive - PetSmart we had a lab/hound mix that pulled like no other. we tried everything. chokers, spiked chokers, traffic leads. we finally found this. the second we put it on him he was like a completely different dog. he started prancing around and everything.
not a fan of those things .. they dont train your dog to behave at all . If you cant get your pup to stay with you by givin a fwe sharp tugs on the lead then try a prong collar. Make sure to correct as soon as the pup decides to go forward.
 
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