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I switched Quinton over to Diamond and his itching has almost stopped entirely. Woo hoo! BUT I feed 2x daily and sometimes he eats and sometimes he doesn't like today I put his food down in the am and just left it, he still hasn't eaten. I think it's pickiness but he should have given in by now. I'm sure he was waiting for the kids to drop something he would much rather eat that and I have to keep the trash up... he is naughty. Lol! Usually I would put his bowl down and pull it up but with him not eating I've been leaving it. I could' dress it up' with something... Any ideas?

Anyways my other question is when I came home there were 3 large yellow piles of vomit, kind of like when you have an empty stomach and vomit. But he acts fine otherwise. No food in it just runny yellow mucasy vomit. Thoughts?
 

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OCD Bullyologist
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DO NOT FREE FEED! Don't add anything to it. Pick a feeding time and stick to it. Give him a set amount of time to eat (Kangol gets 5 but usually finishes before then lol) and if he isn't finished in that amount of time then pick the bowl back up.He will eventually get that he needs to eat when it is put down for him. He may go hungry for a few days, but he won't starve and he'll understand that when you put down that food that he needs to eat it then or it'll be a long time before he gets another chance.
Free feeding turns dogs into picky eaters that do exactly what you are describing.

As for the yellow stuff.... Sometimes dogs will throw up stomach acids that will either be clear or yellow looking bile. Bile can buildup in a dog's stomach and it can make them feel sick, especially on an empty stomach. When you see a dog eating grass thats usually the reason. Try feeding a small amount of food twice daily. For example, if you feed 2 cups a day, then feed 1 cup in the morning and 1 cup in the evening.
 

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The Yard Of Many Colors
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we feed Diamond High Energy.... you need to do like was already said just give him a set amount and dont free feed him!
 

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I've got a similar situation w/ my 15 mo old. I've never free fed. He was on wellness puppy until 1 year and ate w/ no problem, but since I switched to adult food, he's become picky.
He's gone as long as 2 days w/o eating..(no med problems causing the lay off... he looks for other food)...
My 'solution' has been to try and find palatable food for him. Just switched him to wellness core / chicken formula and he's enthusiastic about that so far.. but I've tried canadae grain free salmon, van patten chicken/sweet potato, canadae lamb/rice, evo chicken/turkey, evo red meat..before this latest switch. ( I'd try raw, but, I don't have a spot to feed him raw easily). It's hard to get good reliable info on nutrition, I've read that supplementing kibble w/ quality wet food or foods like boiled chicken mixed in, benefits the dog..and I do that... but he picks out the chicken and leaves kibble he doesn't like.
It's been a little extra effort on my part but he's 'ecstatic' when he likes his feed, and I kind of feel it's my responsibility to indulge him in a simple pleasure. Maybe I'm wrong ? I'm hoping I can find a couple of kibbles he'll eat consistently.
 

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OCD Bullyologist
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I've got a similar situation w/ my 15 mo old. I've never free fed. He was on wellness puppy until 1 year and ate w/ no problem, but since I switched to adult food, he's become picky.
He's gone as long as 2 days w/o eating..(no med problems causing the lay off... he looks for other food)...
My 'solution' has been to try and find palatable food for him. Just switched him to wellness core / chicken formula and he's enthusiastic about that so far.. but I've tried canadae grain free salmon, van patten chicken/sweet potato, canadae lamb/rice, evo chicken/turkey, evo red meat..before this latest switch. ( I'd try raw, but, I don't have a spot to feed him raw easily). It's hard to get good reliable info on nutrition, I've read that supplementing kibble w/ quality wet food or foods like boiled chicken mixed in, benefits the dog..and I do that... but he picks out the chicken and leaves kibble he doesn't like.
It's been a little extra effort on my part but he's 'ecstatic' when he likes his feed, and I kind of feel it's my responsibility to indulge him in a simple pleasure. Maybe I'm wrong ? I'm hoping I can find a couple of kibbles he'll eat consistently.
First, he will eat when he is hungry, plain and simple. Second, what do you mean by you don't have a good spot to feed him RAW? I wouldn't even get started with the wet food bc then he is always going to expect it and I think its a waste of money. Don't boil the chicken if you give it to him... feed it to him RAW. When you cook meat it takes out all the nutrients in it for a dog so any meat you feed then feed it RAW. Elaborate more on you not having a spot to feed RAW???

NON GRAIN FOODS-- Excellent Foods

* Orijen
* ZiWi Peak
* Taste of the Wild
* Blue Buffalo Wilderness

NO CORN - WHEAT - SOY FOODS-- Good foods without the junk fillers

* Blue Buffalo
* Diamond Naturals
* VerUs
 

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First, he will eat when he is hungry, plain and simple. Second, what do you mean by you don't have a good spot to feed him RAW? I wouldn't even get started with the wet food bc then he is always going to expect it and I think its a waste of money. Don't boil the chicken if you give it to him... feed it to him RAW. When you cook meat it takes out all the nutrients in it for a dog so any meat you feed then feed it RAW. Elaborate more on you not having a spot to feed RAW???

NON GRAIN FOODS-- Excellent Foods

* Orijen
* ZiWi Peak
* Taste of the Wild
* Blue Buffalo Wilderness

NO CORN - WHEAT - SOY FOODS-- Good foods without the junk fillers

* Blue Buffalo
* Diamond Naturals
* VerUs
I mean, he can be a messy eater, and I don't want to have to clean raw meat off the kitchen floor 2x a day, and I don't want to have lay down a 'tarp' or other cover which I then have to clean 2x a day, or feed in his crate with similar housekeeping. The people I know personally who feed raw, do it outdoors, which seems to make sense to me.
I'm a messy single guy who lives alone...but I draw the line at raw food on the floor.

Like I said, I've found it hard to get good, reliable nutrition info...for example... raw chicken does contain more nutrients...but I've read that for the purpose of an animal extracting and using those nutrients, boiled is better, because boiling breaks down the cell walls and allows the nutrients to be used, while in raw food, the food is not in the digestive tract long enough for a similar amount of nutrients to be used....this is not personal knowledge, I'm just a well intentioned person trying to do the best I can.
 

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OCD Bullyologist
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I mean, he can be a messy eater, and I don't want to have to clean raw meat off the kitchen floor 2x a day, and I don't want to have lay down a 'tarp' or other cover which I then have to clean 2x a day, or feed in his crate with similar housekeeping. The people I know personally who feed raw, do it outdoors, which seems to make sense to me.
I'm a messy single guy who lives alone...but I draw the line at raw food on the floor.

Like I said, I've found it hard to get good, reliable nutrition info...for example... raw chicken does contain more nutrients...but I've read that for the purpose of an animal extracting and using those nutrients, boiled is better, because boiling breaks down the cell walls and allows the nutrients to be used, while in raw food, the food is not in the digestive tract long enough for a similar amount of nutrients to be used....this is not personal knowledge, I'm just a well intentioned person trying to do the best I can.
I feed RAW and I feed mine outside just in case he ever makes a mess, but he eats everything over his bowl and there is nothing ever left. The AAFCO standards were developed based on the belief that dogs are omnivores and can be properly maintained on a grain-based diet. They are therefore irrelevant to raw diets. Why? First, to gain nutritional analysis, the food must be chemically denatured, cooked, purified, and otherwise manipulated, meaning that any reading is an inaccurate representation of the raw item. This also means that the interactions between nutrients are overlooked as each nutrient is studied separately rather than in conjunction with the others. if a dog is fed as an omnivore, there are good amounts of nutrients unavailable to it that are contained in the indigestible plant matter. Phytates in particular (contained in abundance in grains and soy products-which kibbles often contain in substantial amounts) are well-known for interfering with valuable nutrients like iron, zinc, and calcium. Hence, you have to feed more of these nutrients in order for the dog to get the amount it needs; what the dog actually needs and uses is NOT the same amount of nutrient initially added. This results in skewed and biased standards, as they list the initial nutrient amount added, not the amount absorbed. Thus, bioavailability is less than 100%, and the nutrients in the standards are therefore inaccurate representations of what the dog really needs. AAFCO standards are useless for raw foods. This deals with the reason the food is raw and not cooked. AAFCO standards are based on cooked or processed foods (processed in order to be evaluated), foods which already have a decreased nutritional value because of being cooked or processed. Cooking denatures proteins and collagen, destroys important nutrients, and generally makes the food less digestible and less bioavailable (the exception being grains and vegetables, which we have already determined should not be given to dogs anyway). This means essential vitamins and minerals must be added back in. But how much? In what amounts? Research has shown that synthetic vitamins do not work with the same efficiency as those found in their natural state (i.e. in raw foods). Additionally, many vitamins and minerals interact with each other both negatively and positively. For example, vitamin C increases the uptake of iron, whereas Vitamin E inhibits the uptake of iron. Vitamin C also lowers zinc and manganese uptake, whereas Vitamin E helps increase zinc and manganese absorption (www.acu-cell.com/nico.html). Commercial pet foods should contain all of these nutrients, but are they contained in the proper amounts? And just what is a 'proper amount'? The difficulties for establishing proper amounts have already been discussed. Do they have methods for monitoring the complex interactions of all these nutrients? Since feeding trials simply look at palatability, survival, and the appearance of health, these complex interactions are ignored. Cooking and processing food also kills enzymes that may help with the digestion of the food and the processing of nutrients, so the bioavailability of vitamins and minerals in cooked foods is further reduced (Lonsdale, T. 2001. Raw Meaty Bones. Chapter 4.).

I'm not trying to push RAW on you just letting you know it is better to feed your dog the chicken RAW instead of cooked :)
In my opinion, RAW is everything your dog needs and nothing that he doesn't.

Because you have been adding in the chicken you have given him a taste of the "good stuff" and chances are he won't eat his kibble (until he is really hungry of course) unless the chicken is in there so he may go a few days without eating if you feed only kibble, but don't worry. Also, try one of the foods I listed above as I feel they are the best. Good luck!
 
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