Go Pitbull Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My daughter(13) has a dog, APBT rescue, that shows some fruatration biting when walking next to fences with another dog inside. We have been Learning leave it and when we go by a fence that has a yapping and growling dog we keep moving and tell him leave it...Lately he has been turning and snapping at Katy so she might let go and he can fight them through the fence. Has anyone heard of this and is there anythink ican do about it other than crossing over to the other side of the street every time? Other than this issue he is learning quickly and absolutely loves Katy. She is showing great patience and I am proud of them both, I just need this issue stopped...
 

· Windbag Extrodinaire.
Joined
·
3,307 Posts
Well, I'm not going to say on the open forum because I have my own methods of dealing with such things. I'll just say I tend to be a little forceful without hurting..
 

· Dare to dance the tide
Joined
·
12,407 Posts
Well I don't know how well this works as I just read about it but when you are in this situtation starting out as far as possible from the fence with out leaving the block make the dog sit and hold his leash up tight so he can't move hi head to much once he has settled down and is no longer reacting tell him good boy and move on. At first it could be just when he looks away then move on telling him he is a good boy. It had something to do with making the dog unresponsive to the distraction rather removing the distraction from the dog. Like I said I have never used I just read it this weekend.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
My newly adopted dog had some of this, very slight though. Here's what I did to correct it.
First thing was reading his body language to figure out his escalation from calm to excited. Mine would raise head, ears and focus on the other dog. I could also see the hair between his shoulders raise. For me the trick was to catch him right as this progression started, I mean the second the very instant it started, and respond with a very sharp tug on his lease to the side (towards me). Initially he would respond good until right there at the other dog and then he would escalate instantly and I would have to drag him away walking quickly. But after a couple times of doing this, it all stopped and he responds well to the sideways tug on the lease so long as I catch it early. If I miss it, then I have to escalate my correction higher this his level of excitement before I can gain control again.

Learn to read the body language and give it a try it should work if you catch it quickly enough. At worst you learn to read his body language and that will still help later in his training.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MY MIKADO

· Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Angus's body language is easy to read, I have been using the term "leave it" and going the other way...I told Katy to walk him across the street from the fence in question, hoping that she does not have an issue with it, but she has been nipped a cou;le of times, boy he truly hates the reaction he gets when he gives her a hard time...as I have said befoer, she is one tough cookie. Does anyone know if this ever goes away permanently?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
We had a border collie that did that, and my way to solve things is the shock collar. You only put it on the setting that gets their attention, not to shock the crap out of them. When we use it on Nevaeh, just because she has a higher pain tolerance we have to have hers set to 4, when our lab feels it at just 2 sometimes 1. The collar works wonders, I love it. Our border collie learned after the 2nd zap and never did it again therefore we never had to use it on her again. Right now I use it on Nevaeh as she has a jumping problem, it works great on that also. She now will run up to you but sit and wait to be pet, or course while her tail is going a hundred miles an hour. Lol. I know some people don't like the collar but it has worked wonders with our dogs and it doesn't hurt them at all! :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
when a dog has no problem redirecting his aggression on the human, it becomes a little bit of a dangerous problem. how old is the dog. the dog whether gets to excited that it snaps at the handler unintentionally or it is in such a dominant state that it will correct (bite) the human to let him go to pin down the other dog on the other side of the fence. bothe are dangerous. a dog that becomes so excited that it can no longer think can bite. a dog that is so dominant that it disregards the human as an authority figure can bite to disagree with the human.
point blank is that whatever you are doing isn't working. it might not be so bad now but as time goes by your dog will become very dominant and dangerous to your family. with a dog in this state of mind it is difficult to tell you how to handle it. it seems that you allow him to escalate to such intensity that alot of techniques given will need a skilled handler to adjust to that particular case. A correction will work, but exactly what will the correction involve? what timing? this case...I think...requires a professional to tailor a system that will solve your issue. It is more than just the yapping dogs...it is the overall life that the dog is living that has to be examined.
I suggest finding a professional.
look up International Association of Canine Proffesionals. they have a search engine that can find certified proffessionals in your area/ i think it is The International Association of Canine Professionals
best of luck
 

· Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
when a dog has no problem redirecting his aggression on the human, it becomes a little bit of a dangerous problem. how old is the dog. the dog whether gets to excited that it snaps at the handler unintentionally or it is in such a dominant state that it will correct (bite) the human to let him go to pin down the other dog on the other side of the fence. bothe are dangerous. a dog that becomes so excited that it can no longer think can bite. a dog that is so dominant that it disregards the human as an authority figure can bite to disagree with the human.
point blank is that whatever you are doing isn't working. it might not be so bad now but as time goes by your dog will become very dominant and dangerous to your family. with a dog in this state of mind it is difficult to tell you how to handle it. it seems that you allow him to escalate to such intensity that alot of techniques given will need a skilled handler to adjust to that particular case. A correction will work, but exactly what will the correction involve? what timing? this case...I think...requires a professional to tailor a system that will solve your issue. It is more than just the yapping dogs...it is the overall life that the dog is living that has to be examined.
I suggest finding a professional.
look up International Association of Canine Proffesionals. they have a search engine that can find certified proffessionals in your area/ i think it is The International Association of Canine Professionals
best of luck
First youare reading alot into a situation that you know very little about. Angus is a year old and we have had him since he was 4 months. He was a shelter dog that had comein stray and upon fnding the owner/breeder we found that he was an APBT. He belongs to my daughter, age 13. A hard headed girl that dosent give an inch when it comes to training. I am a rescue working with the bully breeds only. I work with Angus no less than every other day personally. the frustration snapping has gotten much better and we have learned how to control the issue. he still gets would up when we pass a fence that has an agressive dog, but other than whinning and pulling we are able to control the issue. I appreciate your thoughts about a trainer and have consultanted a few and have used ideas they have suggested to correct the problem, but I in no way thing this is a dangerous dog....
 

· Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Sorry to have offended you. I was only giving my opinion based on a written discription of what the situation is. From what I visiualize... that is what my opinion is. I know that you can handle the situation and that your daughter is in no harm, but when a dog nips at the people it breaks that boundary and if things continue the same it usually gets worse with time.
It's great that you have lessened the problem and im sure that within time you will solve it completely. I said that what you were doing wasn't working because you described it as if it was getting worse. Obviously it's not...it's getting better, so it is working. What I meant is that some people don't uderstand a technique enough to make it work. They usually need to switch techniques or research this technique in more depth. But it seems that you are doing fine, so best of luck.
Another thing is that anyone can become a trainer, being a certified trainer is rather easy as well if you have the money, but to find a real professional you have to look at where they were certified and learn about this place, then look at the individual. This area of profession is very sneaky and not patrolled properly. IACP is a very honest group and require a good deal to become a certified member. Just for future refrence.
Have a great time
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
670 Posts
My girl Kalie has leash aggression like you would not believe. When I rescued her at 1yo she had spent 23 hours a day in a dark room by herself. She was allowed 4 "bathroom breaks" lasting no longer then 15min and was put back in the room. She had ZERO socialization. When I got her and took her out on walks anything that came within her comfort zone, which was about 150 feet, she would turn and start biting at my hands trying to get me to drop the leash. I'll be honest and tell you that it hurt like hell too.

To correct this I taught her the reliable "watch me". Whenever she would look directly in my eyes she got a treat. Started off with the instant we made eye contact she got a treat. After a couple tries she got one after 3 seconds, 5 seconds and so on. Now she will hold eye contact with me for a good 5min + if asked. Now when we go out on walks and I see her tense up or start to focus on another dog I just give the command "watch me" and walk right past the direction holding eye contact with her the whole time. Once we pass the distraction for her then she gets treated. It took some time and wasn't an overnight fix but it works for me.

Oh ya I also want you to remember that when you hold the dogs eye contact you still need to glance at what is in front of you. I have walked into the bumpers of parked cars and knocked myself loopy a couple times on low thick branches branches. lol
 

· Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sorry to have offended you. I was only giving my opinion based on a written discription of what the situation is. From what I visiualize... that is what my opinion is. I know that you can handle the situation and that your daughter is in no harm, but when a dog nips at the people it breaks that boundary and if things continue the same it usually gets worse with time.
It's great that you have lessened the problem and im sure that within time you will solve it completely. I said that what you were doing wasn't working because you described it as if it was getting worse. Obviously it's not...it's getting better, so it is working. What I meant is that some people don't uderstand a technique enough to make it work. They usually need to switch techniques or research this technique in more depth. But it seems that you are doing fine, so best of luck.
Another thing is that anyone can become a trainer, being a certified trainer is rather easy as well if you have the money, but to find a real professional you have to look at where they were certified and learn about this place, then look at the individual. This area of profession is very sneaky and not patrolled properly. IACP is a very honest group and require a good deal to become a certified member. Just for future refrence.
Have a great time
No offense taken, Always appreciate advice. Sorry if it sounded otherwise...
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top