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Welcome.

Why are you breeding dogs with unknown history? Have you done any health testing? Have they proven themselves in sport, conformation or another venue? How can you be sure that there won't be any health problems with them or the pups later down the line? You clearly don't have a pedigree so you don't know their history.

Breeding isn't something you do just because you like your dogs. I like my dogs a lot but they're mutts and I couldn't breed them with a good conscience.

I hope you think about this before continuing with your plans to breed.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm sorry, I don't understand why you wouldn't allow your mutts to reproduce. Health risks I understand but the fact that they are mutts doesn't necessarily mean that they will possess said health risks.

I'm not about to start a kennel nor claim to be a breeder, but I personally believe my dogs should be able to reproduce as nature intended, even if it's only once. I also am aware of the potential health risks and will take the necessary steps as my vet and I see fit.

Our dogs are pets, as will be their offspring. That's the only way they need to prove themselves as far as we're concerned. I may be on a tiny island in the Caribbean Sea but m brother and I take very good care of our children.

I hope my response has not offended anyone. I am grateful for the concern and understand where you all are coming from. Thanks again ��
 

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Sorry, IMO there's just no excuse for backyard breeding. There are millions of mutts just like yours in shelters that need homes but will probably be destroyed instead. Why add to that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
With all due respect, you know nothing of what's going on over here nor who I am. You may not want to make assumptions about things like that.

FYI I have owned two rescued dogs, a rotti and a pit. So I am well aware of the situation regarding animals in my country. It is much worse than in America and I would have to be quite daft to perpetuate this.

I also take offence at your insinuation of me being an irresponsible owner.
 

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Well its a whole different world. please don't be offended, we do not take to people breeding dogs just because they are in heat. there are TONS of dogs that need homes there is no point to breed to create more dogs that are just being bred because they can be. We call it responsible breeding vs irresponsible breeding. No one is saying you don't love your dogs or care for them. Responsibly Breeding dogs should only be for a purpose, and breeding to create pets is not a responsible purpose. If you do conformation or other Events with your dog and they prove themselves worthy of breeding. I like to have it taken another step and dogs get heath tests (hips eyes and heart) to make sure they are sound for reproducing. I know you have a huge dog problem in Jamaica. I have a tons of friends who live over there. So why would you want to add to the over population? And you admit your dogs are mixed so why create more Mixed dogs?? Especially with phrases like "low rider" that are genetically not sound animals. Heath issues galore.

Your pups are adorable. thank you for sharing them and please stick around to see what we are all about and where we are Coming from.
 

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Hello LadyandRhino and welcome to the forum. If you spend just a little time snooping around and reading the stickies you will be able to get a better feeling about this forum and how the majority of the members are passionate about this breed.

As you should know, there are already way to many mutts in rescue centers and running loose without homes already. Unless there is a purpose to breed more mutts it makes little sense to do so. Members here are not picking on you but rather voicing their concerns about more mutts out there while so many sit in cages waiting for a chance to find homes.

Joe
 

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With all due respect, you know nothing of what's going on over here nor who I am. You may not want to make assumptions about things like that.

FYI I have owned two rescued dogs, a rotti and a pit. So I am well aware of the situation regarding animals in my country. It is much worse than in America and I would have to be quite daft to perpetuate this.

I also take offence at your insinuation of me being an irresponsible owner.
If the situation is even worse than in America, where it is BAD, why would you do it anyways? THAT is exactly why I would not only call you irresponsible but IGNORANT. I don't need to know you. Your comments have made it clear. I'm not going to comment again because I don't want to continue trying to get the same point across to someone who has no interest in hearing it, but I just urge you to THINK before you breed.

Have a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I thank you for explaining your stance so well. I understand all points made.

Long and short of the story, I won't add to the problems that exist. Thank you all though and I look forward to getting to know you all
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ignorant you say. Haha. These assumptions. Well thank you all for your time but I have decided that I no longer want to be a part of this forum.
 

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I certainly don't agree with what you're doing, but they aren't my dogs and therefore its not my decision to make.
With that being said welcome to the forums.
Edit: I'm sorry that you don't feel welcome here, the other members were simply stating their opinions and sharing some (good in my opinion) advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Agreed that good advice has been shared. Not in the best way though.

I am not irresponsible nor ignorant.

Our future puppies will not compound the problem.

Thank you all
 

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Thanks for sticking around. I hear you and not trying to be a jerk or offend you but in the states 1/3 of all dogs in shelters are because of Irresponsible and back yard breeders (BYB). The dogs you produce as pets are taking away from already existing dogs that could be great pets. That is how it's contributes to the problem. I'm on my phone or I would like the thread this is discussed but here is a bit of a study where shelter dogs comes from. The last line is key:

" Citing a study published in the Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, the blogger points out that one of the biggest problems with eschewing "bred" dogs entirely is the very issue of where shelter dogs come from in the first place. Remember what I said earlier, that the "oversupply" issue goes back to basic economics, as you read this next part (edited for clarity):

The study determined that 3.9% of surrendered [dogs] came from a pet shop; 10.6% of surrendered animals came from a breeder; 2.9% of surrendered animals were received as a gift; 9.3% of surrendered animals were found by the owner as a stray; 6.0% of surrendered animals were offspring of another pet in possession of the owner; 22.5% of surrendered animals were originally acquired from another shelter; and, 30.8% of surrendered animals were acquired from a friend.

In other words, in a survey of a dozen animal shelters in six states across four different regions of the country, only 2.9% of dogs surrendered to animal shelters came from pet shops and only 10.6% came from breeders… The vast majority came from much more logical sources, if you think about it (again, edited for clarity):

These are the statistics that cause more concern: 6% of dogs surrendered were from offspring of another pet in possession of the relinquisher, otherwise know as I-didn't-know-that-animals-can-have-babies-before-their-first-birthday-itis.

Some 30.8% of dogs surrendered were obtained from a friend, otherwise know as my-female-dog-got-knocked-up-by-the-male-dog-that-lives-next-door-and-can-you-take-a-puppy disease, but sometimes known as the I'm-moving/have-a new-baby/just-got-a-new-job-and-I-need-to-get-rid-of my-pet-can-you-take-it syndrome.

Another 22.5% of dogs were obtained from another shelter, also known as I-knew-this-pet-had-behavioral-problems-when-I-adopted-it-thought-I-could-handle-it-but now-I-can't disorder.

Dogs most at risk for relinquishment were of mixed breed heritage, intact, young, owned for less than a year and purchased for less than $100"

Sent from Petguide.com App so please excuses the typos
 
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