Go Pitbull Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ever since the whole incident where roxy growled at my mom, i have questioned her temperment and whether or not she was a good fit for our family. seemingly, things were going well, but i worried about her being a sharp dog, with weak nerves, and my children. she had never shown any sort of aggression with them, but it has been in the back on my mind since a poster here mentioned that she was showing early signs of fear aggression. (thanks so much for that heads up! wake up call anyone? lol)

so i decided that we should really see a professional. after calling around and doing lots of local research, a trained named dave came very highly recommended for aggression issues. he has worked with pits and other aggressive dogs for quite some time.

so we took her in today, and good new, he thinks shes fine :D just what i needed to hear! we took roxy down to his kennels, and while he feels like she is a little on the scared side, and lacks confidence, that alot of it can be hammered out with some normal obedience and maturity. he put her through the ringer, and she did great. woot! she showed no signs of aggression the entire time. so now, i feel like we can move forward, and really start to bond with roxy knowing that shes where she belongs. :D for now, i am going to do alot of roxy's obedience on myown. once shes about 6-8 months old, well start seeing this trainer for some more intense training.

i just thought i would update, for those of you who i have discussed this with. thanks for all the help and support! you guys have been great :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,377 Posts
Good to hear you're more comfortable with her now.

Personally I would do it the other way around training wise. If you do her obedience training on your own while she's young and then do it with a professional later, you're likely to be stuck working on undoing what you've been doing with her on your own. I hope that makes sense. Have you done any obedience training before?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,147 Posts
Great news, now you have a place to start knowing she is fine temperment wise and probably brings alot of relief to you. good luck with her , really glad she passed.
 

·
APBT!
Joined
·
9,589 Posts
Amber, I'm so happy for you that things worked out in yours and Roxy's favor! I'm glad that we could be of assistance to you and get you on the right path! Please keep us updated and be sure to post more pix of her, please!!
 

·
Silver VIP Member
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
Good to hear you're more comfortable with her now.

Personally I would do it the other way around training wise. If you do her obedience training on your own while she's young and then do it with a professional later, you're likely to be stuck working on undoing what you've been doing with her on your own. I hope that makes sense. Have you done any obedience training before?
damn good point.
with 2 sides.theirs a natural technique that filks use.

ok,point of clarity:their are several types of dog owners.the need to distingouish each one is unnecessary.I will speak about what we would deem proper.the owner of a pit,who knows or is learning that they have A superhero for A dog.as with superhero's their are duds and those who go to the dark side.
you (OP) were worried your girl was bound down that road,you got/sought expert opinion.
as to Aus Staffy's POI,and the person who is learning about their SH and the breed,and not real slick on either and will be using A trainer in the future.
if you have an idea as to what type of command training your going to pursue,just regular dog manager training,do myou have a family?will it be a kid dog that will essentially be taking direction from one source,2 sources or many?
dogs,especially pits are brilliant.they excel in social settings and listen and follow up awesome,when asked to do so within reason.
example:K-9's.do they kennel them like they do cruisers in big cities and send them out with two officers,whoevers turn it is in the vehicle?NO.
they are sequestered to an officer/handler.his family pack,and percentagely maintained by the handler with which it works.
so you've got to determine the dogs pecking order.who's po-po #1 to the dog?
so on and so forth.you should be the one who ingratiates all the commands and disciplines into the dogs mindset.
what happens often, is 2-3-4 people are using extreme measures of commands and enforcement.this one swats it's butt for discipline,this other one yanks the collar,so on and so forth.voices get raised,or beg for reaction to A command etc.
I've given all these failed scenarios for one point.
wouldn't you just like it to be easier than reading all this crap?
I have always used the mind set,go in knowing the failures,and look for the bright spots.in my mind I think about all the what ifs.
then when I walk up to my dog,or reach down,they are usually there,I say to myself.dog,I will not fail you.
thats the biggest issue with dog ownership.we fail the dogs.I don't know the percentage,of dogs in rescue that are superior animals.disregard breed for A second.they have all been failed at some point.yeah,yep,aha,sure enough,their are some dogs that should be deemed down dogs.as with humans,it is with animals.I feel on A lesser scale though.
you said pro trainer.is your agression temperament trainer your guy?
do you have one?are you seriously getting one?
if yes,then ask him for a SMALL regimen of tasks he'd like you to master to his design of training.measure the dog to the trainer.have the dog doing small obedience task that he will be using.cut and gather the pieces for your tuxedo.have them ready.and when he's done you'll have an armani.
KISS,keep it simple stupid (the stupid refers to stupidly simple,not your stupid,LOL)
theirs some people here,that will tell you how many times,like Aus-Staffy alluded to they had to re-program A dog.
they'll tell you elaborate measures for training are more A hindrance.
dogs minds do not create scenarios.they take a poit or lead and follw up on it.they don't determine the ramifications.
you've seen the dogs that do the 1+4=5. they don't know what 1 really is,or the 4 and 5.dogs that do are few and far between and most of them have learned through what?the same thing all trainers use,command,repetition,reward.and then they remove the reward for the most part and create A different system,be it a toy or love,oooh,that word.
what is your dog looking for?the return of love through LOYALTY.
your dog will never fail you.it may break course,usually because we miss out Que's.
theirs so much more to dog handling,mood,environment,situations,tension,noise and confusion,etc.
prepare yourself you are about to venture into the best or worse thing in your life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good to hear you're more comfortable with her now.

Personally I would do it the other way around training wise. If you do her obedience training on your own while she's young and then do it with a professional later, you're likely to be stuck working on undoing what you've been doing with her on your own. I hope that makes sense. Have you done any obedience training before?
i completely understand what youre saying. but yes, i do know the basics of training, and i dont think that it will be an issue. i worked for a kennel that trained working dogs, as well as pets. this trainer really doesnt like to do heavy training on such young dogs for a few reasons. the first is that he is expensive. i know that sounds bad, but, i do not want to waste $1200 on training, and she doesnt even have basic obedience down. i know how to handle the normal stuff, if that makes sense. by the time she is 6-9 months, i will have figured out most of the basic stuff that i dont want to waste training sessions from this trainer on. also, puppies simply dont have the attention span for some of the more intensive work id like to do. also, seeing her mature will let us know for certain how stable her temperment really is.

i feel like i have really done alot with rox in terms of bringing her out of her shell and how she deals with stress. its been more than a week since our last incident, and the kennel that we went to was super stressful for her. she wasnt very confident while we were there, but there were no signs of aggression and her recovery time was great. it only took a few minutes before she realized the loud barking dogs were not going to turn her into lunch and were nothing to be afraid of, and that the trainer was not scary either. if on the way i feel like things have suddenly gotten out of control, i will definately call him. but in the meantime, i can just do some basic obedience, form a good strong bond with my dog, and look forward to some awesome work that well start on when shes older. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,377 Posts
i completely understand what youre saying. but yes, i do know the basics of training, and i dont think that it will be an issue. i worked for a kennel that trained working dogs, as well as pets. this trainer really doesnt like to do heavy training on such young dogs for a few reasons. the first is that he is expensive. i know that sounds bad, but, i do not want to waste $1200 on training, and she doesnt even have basic obedience down. i know how to handle the normal stuff, if that makes sense. by the time she is 6-9 months, i will have figured out most of the basic stuff that i dont want to waste training sessions from this trainer on. also, puppies simply dont have the attention span for some of the more intensive work id like to do. also, seeing her mature will let us know for certain how stable her temperment really is.

i feel like i have really done alot with rox in terms of bringing her out of her shell and how she deals with stress. its been more than a week since our last incident, and the kennel that we went to was super stressful for her. she wasnt very confident while we were there, but there were no signs of aggression and her recovery time was great. it only took a few minutes before she realized the loud barking dogs were not going to turn her into lunch and were nothing to be afraid of, and that the trainer was not scary either. if on the way i feel like things have suddenly gotten out of control, i will definately call him. but in the meantime, i can just do some basic obedience, form a good strong bond with my dog, and look forward to some awesome work that well start on when shes older. :)
Fair enough. As long as you and her are cool with each other I see no problem with that.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top