Go Pitbull Forums banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So okay, we're watching a friend of mine's 3 month old puppy. We're unsure what breed she is, but she -looks- like an American Pitbull Terrier. My friend bought her from a couple of people who weren't cut out to be dog-parents, who literally let the pup jump out the car window at a restaurant and when she approached my friends, they offered 20 bucks for her and the people gave her up. Dagny's set to see the vet on Tuesday, but the apartment complex they're in demands a blood test? If she's part pit, they can't have her there.

So my Mom's thinking about taking her on if our friend can't keep her, if not just until she can find a rental or a home that will accept Dagny. I mentioned this to a dog-wise friend of mine, and now I'm worried. She's never owned a pit, so I wanted a few answers from people who -knew- the breed.

She claimed that pits are usually dog-aggressive. Said they might be good in a household for awhile and then suddenly snap, or their prey-drive be triggered by smaller dogs/cats, even with proper socialization (which is another reason my mom wants to take her if our friend can't have her, because otherwise Dag would go to her dad and he won't socialize, he won't train, she'll just become a wasted dog...) -- Is this true?

We have several dachshunds and various sized cats...all of them are dog-friendly/unafraid of big dogs and Dagny gets on with them now, but when she's bigger, will she hurt them? I worry because my mom is carefree in the fact that Dagny's playing with my kitten (well, he's a young cat--a kitten in an adult's body lol) and he's playing with her, bowling her over, and they're having fun...

I really love Dag--everyone in my family does. She's sweet-hearted, brilliant, picked up on clicker-training wonderfully, so much smarter than any of our hounds. I crave a dog whose brain you can see turning cogs as she works out shaping and offering behaviors. But I don't have pit-experience--I was raised with hounds and herding dogs. I went through 7 years of obedience with my cattledog/shep mix, who was iffy with dogs, slightly neurotic, and human-shy, so I have experience to an extent, but the idea of the dog 'snapping' even if socialized correctly scares me.

Can anyone give me first-hand information? If pits and small dogs/cats can live in harmony? The APBT is really a breed I admire and would love to own someday--I just don't want my mom getting over her head and taking on this puppy if this is something to worry about.

Thanks--

Kodi
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,000 Posts
Welcome! I don't like to say dogs snap or are like a ticking time bomb but yes, dog aggression and animal aggression in general is a very big part of the American pit bull terrier. But you don't know if you have an APBT since the dog jumped in your car you have no idea what it is. But any breed of dog could not like other dogs at some point. If you take the dog and raise it there is a chance your animals might not always get along, i don't love everyone i know all the time either, why would i expect my dog to not have a bad day sometimes too. Also If you have prior experience with a neurotic dog then I am sure you learned to read your dogs body language over time. You knew what triggers and what situations were good or bad for your dog. It's the same with all dogs. They don't snap. People typically have no clue and do not see the signs. The signs can be VERY VERY subtle from mouth closing, butt tense, leg tense, ears stand different. I see a bunch of different things in my boy so I know if he is anxious, about to be stalking something scared, happy, relaxed, I can read how he is. If you spend time learning your dog, it doesn't "snap."

So only take the dog if you are aware it might happen one day and are will be prepared to crate and Rotate the dogs if things go south. I would never leave them alone together, ever. I don't think any breed of dog should be left alone together. Not worth the risk IMO.

Blood tests are only for determining parents of a dog through dna not for breed identification. Although blood test studies have shown its slightly better than saliva it's still Not there yet. Unfortunately it seems like it doesn't matter to the apartment complex If the test it actually right , so it's a moot point. But since you have no clue what the dog is who knows what it would be. How much percent is allowed? Or none?
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top