Go Pitbull Forums banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
today my son was playing with Bella and she bit down on the edge of his sleeve where his wrist is. she had a good grip and wouldnt let go at all. she was growling. i know she was playing and i don't want to hurt her trying to get her to release if this happens again. any advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
When my pup was that young I would grab her by the scruff of her neck. It doesn't hurt them and they instantly let go.

You need to work on a release command, but with a pup this young it will take some time for her to learn it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When my pup was that young I would grab her by the scruff of her neck. It doesn't hurt them and they instantly let go.

You need to work on a release command, but with a pup this young it will take some time for her to learn it!
ok thank you :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,164 Posts
First, be patient. She doesn't know the difference between clothing and soft toys or tugs. Second, be careful. She's at an impressionable age. Scruffing a dog can indeed hurt them, depending on how sensitive they are, and you don't want to create other problems like fear of having her neck/collar grabbed.

Set up a little play session and work on your "out," or whatever release command you plan on using. Yummy treats required. Get her playing with something so she's tugging. When you're ready, quit engaging her. (By that I mean stop tugging, just hold your end and don't do anything to further stimulate her.) Hold the treat in front of her nose and in a calm voice, say your word. When she lets go of the tug, give her the treat and immediately praise her, "good out!" or whatever. Then you can bring the tug back and do it again. This is also a good time to work on "get it" or whatever you want to tell her when its okay to tug something.

That's what I do. You can also use a second toy to get her to "out" the first. Remember, patience. Some pups take longer to learn the game than others. But it's never too soon to start waking up her brain. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
Good post.

My pup isn't the least bit sensitive with her neck, but I wasn't thinking about other pups not being just like her! lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,164 Posts
One of my dogs will cry if you scruff her. My other dog won't make a sound, but you can tell she doesn't like it. And of course there are others that don't care. If it was an emergency situation, I would have no problem grabbing the scruff to stop a dog doing something like biting skin or biting another dog. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
First, be patient. She doesn't know the difference between clothing and soft toys or tugs. Second, be careful. She's at an impressionable age. Scruffing a dog can indeed hurt them, depending on how sensitive they are, and you don't want to create other problems like fear of having her neck/collar grabbed.

Set up a little play session and work on your "out," or whatever release command you plan on using. Yummy treats required. Get her playing with something so she's tugging. When you're ready, quit engaging her. (By that I mean stop tugging, just hold your end and don't do anything to further stimulate her.) Hold the treat in front of her nose and in a calm voice, say your word. When she lets go of the tug, give her the treat and immediately praise her, "good out!" or whatever. Then you can bring the tug back and do it again. This is also a good time to work on "get it" or whatever you want to tell her when its okay to tug something.

That's what I do. You can also use a second toy to get her to "out" the first. Remember, patience. Some pups take longer to learn the game than others. But it's never too soon to start waking up her brain. :)
this was my line of thinking but i was told she is too young for treats is there something you recommend?
also, allot of people and even children when they interact with her they right away sick their fingers in her mouth. asking if she's teething. i shouldn't let this happen right? since i'm trying to teach her biting us is not ok?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i'm sorry if i seem to be asking allot of stupid questions i just want what's best for her. i've owned dogs in my life but never a puppy this small. i feel lost.
 

·
scratchin hard
Joined
·
2,147 Posts
scruffing his neck is what his mama would do if he pissed her off,fyi
 

·
I'm the blue dragon!
Joined
·
4,564 Posts
.Set up a little play session and work on your "out," or whatever release command you plan on using. Yummy treats required. Get her playing with something so she's tugging. When you're ready, quit engaging her. (By that I mean stop tugging, just hold your end and don't do anything to further stimulate her.) Hold the treat in front of her nose and in a calm voice, say your word. When she lets go of the tug, give her the treat and immediately praise her, "good out!" or whatever. Then you can bring the tug back and do it again. This is also a good time to work on "get it" or whatever you want to tell her when its okay to tug something.
i never had to actually teach OUT before. Odin just kinda natually understood "drop it" but while playin with the flirt pole today i discovered that if Banshee knew the command she wasnt doin it for me. so i held the treat infront of her nose and said OUT, and boom! she let go and ate the treat. now to get her to actually learn it and OUT without the treat...

so yes, i like this method...:clap:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
i never had to actually teach OUT before. Odin just kinda natually understood "drop it" but while playin with the flirt pole today i discovered that if Banshee knew the command she wasnt doin it for me. so i held the treat infront of her nose and said OUT, and boom! she let go and ate the treat. now to get her to actually learn it and OUT without the treat...

so yes, i like this method...:clap:
i love the name Odin!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
I taught a drop it and a leave it:
Training Your Dog to Drop It and Leave It - New Pictures & Video

I started in puppyhood and have consistently used/practiced since then. I now have a dog that is reluctant to take a hotdog from me if she knows we are going to "work it" not "eat it" and who will spit out a hotdog on command.

I taught "open" for open your mouth as in so I can brush your teeth (which is great to get dogs used to having people handle and have their hands in their mouth) or look in your mouth.

I also taught the "gentle" command for taking treats and other things from human hands.
Teaching Your Dog to Take Treats Gently | The Bark

These are IMO all good things to start working on when your dog is a pup, especially if you have children.

Just takes time, patience and practice. Practice a few minutes a day every day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I taught a drop it and a leave it:
Training Your Dog to Drop It and Leave It - New Pictures & Video

I started in puppyhood and have consistently used/practiced since then. I now have a dog that is reluctant to take a hotdog from me if she knows we are going to "work it" not "eat it" and who will spit out a hotdog on command.

I taught "open" for open your mouth as in so I can brush your teeth (which is great to get dogs used to having people handle and have their hands in their mouth) or look in your mouth.

I also taught the "gentle" command for taking treats and other things from human hands.
Teaching Your Dog to Take Treats Gently | The Bark

These are IMO all good things to start working on when your dog is a pup, especially if you have children.

Just takes time, patience and practice. Practice a few minutes a day every day.
what is a good/safe treat to give her at 7 weeks?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,000 Posts
My boy had no interest in food til he was a year old. His favorite ball was used as a treat for me. Does she love her food? You coil always use kibbles as reward. I use cheese sticks cause they are easy to break off but not all pups can have cheese cause of their bellies.

Sent from Petguide.com App
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top