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K9 Pshrynk & Conciliare~
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Humanity:
human - characteristic of humanity; "human nature"
human - relating to a person; "the experiment was conducted on 6 monkeys and 2 human subjects"
human - ****: any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
having human form or attributes as opposed to those of animals or divine beings; "human beings"; "the human body"; "human kindness"; "human frailty"
wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/

Continued~ this from WEBSTERS/MERRIUM
Main Entry: hu·man·i·ty
Pronunciation: \hyü-ˈma-nə-tē, yü-\
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural hu·man·i·ties
Date: 14th century
1 : the quality or state of being humane
2 a : the quality or state of being human b plural : human attributes or qualities <his work has the ripeness of the 18th century, and its rough humanities - Pamela H. Johnson>
3 plural : the branches of learning (as philosophy, arts, or languages) that investigate human constructs and concerns as opposed to natural processes (as in physics or chemistry) and social relations (as in anthropology or economics)
4 : the human race : the totality of human beings

The quality or state of being HUMAN and adding HUMAN attributes..
D.H. Lawrence wrote: SELF PITY~ "I never saw a wild thing
sorry for itself.
A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough
without ever having felt sorry for itself
."

HUMANIACS - Definition/Description

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Let me just post this to let all the readers in all the corners of the planet to know what the term/word "HUMANIAC" means. This "humaniac" word has been used here for sometime but I doubt [with respect] if everyone who mentions it knows much about it.

The term HUMANIAC, as of this time is being used as a SLANG in the US/Canada and Great Britain and elsewhere in Europe to describe and name these groups of;;;

*** - Animal Rights Activists
**** - People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
**** - Humane Society of the United States
ACS - Anti Cruelty Society
ALF - Animal Liberation Front
Anti Vivisectionists

The people of these groups are called "HUMANIACS" because their cause/theme/mantra "humane, humane, humane treatment" of animals. The people of these groups elevate the status of animals equal, perhaps even higher than human beings. HUMANE + MANIAC = HUMANIAC

The groups above are very well funded and well organized. They can even influence the politicians out of their lobbying. They get their funding from people through solicitation out of their lies about how people treat the own animals.

These groups are AGAINST eating meat,,, hunting,,, rodeo,,, bullfighting,,, pet ownership,,, animal research for pharmaceutical and biomedical studies even for the cure of any disease,,, and most of all,,, they are against owning gamefowls and cockfighting and they are also against cutting trees and any human dominion over other creatures.

I believe one or more [ I can't specify ] of these groups was tagged and considered by the law [US/FBI] as terrorist group. I believe one of their paid arsonist has been caught and sentenced to prison terms for burning a lumber yard...
In my recollection...one or more of these groups has been cought of bombing a research facility and another one was the break-in and taking away the lab animals from the University of Iowa.

These humaniacs has been HARASSING the research investigators including their families.....many more...

And these are a group of hypocrites too....
PETA Kills Animals | PetaKillsAnimals.com

" I am a Vet tech, certified in Euthanasia, w/ certificate in canine behavior specialist and have put down many animals, because there aren't ENOUGH accountable people, however EVERYONE is a HUMANIAC when it comes to dog ownership. DOGS are NOT PEOPLE.. They are dogs, ONE OF THE BEST TOOLS man has created becuase they do ALL of what is required and give us companionship as well" This is the key to the emotional tie between man/woman and pet, however they are NOT human. I have six kids and NOT EVER have I asked the neighbor or a friend to FEED and WATER them while I was gone. My Native American side knows that the spirit in all things is from the same source, but thats an entire diferent concept from which most would be completely LOST.
 

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Very informative and interesting, IMO.. thank you for sharing that! It's always nice to know the definitions of words that we try to sling around, presenting ourselves as worldy, or knowledgeable. I for one, will look up a word if I want to use it, to make sure I've got the correct meaning in mind, and that it fits into the context I'm using it in. Idk.. maybe I'm just a "bookworm" like that, lol. But seriously, thank you for sharing that with us!
 

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The people of these groups are called "HUMANIACS" because their cause/theme/mantra "humane, humane, humane treatment" of animals. The people of these groups elevate the status of animals equal, perhaps even higher than human beings. HUMANE + MANIAC = HUMANIAC
Yup that is what I was meaning when I used it.
 

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K9 Pshrynk & Conciliare~
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just hope its beneficial, the media does nothing but confuse people, as you said LadyPit, people just read more to be sure they know of what they speak. If ya'll like cool, if not I'm sorry its the simple truth, couldn't help myself.
 

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Just hope its beneficial, the media does nothing but confuse people, as you said LadyPit, people just read more to be sure they know of what they speak. If ya'll like cool, if not I'm sorry its the simple truth, couldn't help myself.
:clap: Thanks for sharing
 

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Well I guess since I viewed my pups as my equals ( as, I believe, Deb states in her signature that one must become more like a dog, thus forming a kind of equal relationship?) and did not exercise any unnecessary dominion over them then, by definition I'm a humaniac. Not the worst thing I've been called....even this week!!! And I'm sure your Native American side recognizes the extreme reverance paid to nature whether hunting by necessity or gardening the very soil mother nature has to offer. Nature is considered a Brother, something that seems very equal to me:)
 

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Thanks!

:goodpost:

There are several terms that have snagged me from time to time on here. Usually they just require some further reading to sort out.

But I needed the definition to this one! lol
 

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K9 Pshrynk & Conciliare~
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
James Larking, Native Americans and Sacrifice, (full text)
Where a people's vision speaks of life, sacrificial means for recurrent renewal of all life, and suffering for the identity with the source of life, such vision can neither be destroyed, denied or ignored.

Native Americans practised sacrifice in many forms, from the simple giving of oneself, spiritually, in the Lakota Vision Quest, to the elaborate rituals of the Incas and Aztecs. As a sacred path, the sacrifice has always existed among the tribes of the Americas. These traditions required of their adherents both sacrifice and death; the two aspects are intricately intertwined. The foremost theme of sacrifice and death is the giving up of yourself, whether in an inward or outward sense.

All these holy peoples and holy things are now hearing what I say! O Wakan-Tanka, I shall offer up my body and soul that my people may live!

The outward sacrifice is the ritual performed, the surrender of earthly goods or of life itself, for the renewal of that life, for all things are interconnected.
We should understand well that all things are the work of the Great Spirit. We should know that He is within all things: the trees, the grasses, the rivers, the mountains, and all the four legged animals, and the winged peoples.

The inward sacrifice is the capitulation of the ego, the death of the lower self, to attain the higher. Rather than loss, as it would first appear to be, the sacrificant gains all; unity with the Creator. That which is ephemeral is abandoned and the imperishable is all that remains. Sacrifice and death, then, are positive affirmations of the truth of existence; that we must lose in order to gain.

American Indian belief is that this life is a gift from the gods and a sacrificial attitude acknowledges this gift, returning thanks from deep within ourselves. This path is the only way to a wholesome existence for the Native American. With this inner pathway and the outward ritual comes access to the Divine storehouse, without this, the door is closed. It is believed by the Lakota that if the affirmation of sacrifice is not made then the, "Every energy of the world will run out." The sacrificial rites of the Sweat Lodge, the Sun Dance and the Crying for a Vision are all a giving of oneself to renew creation.

O Grandfather Wakan-Tanka, bend down and look upon me as I raise my hand to you. You have beheld this sacred centre which we have fixed, where we shall suffer. I offer all this suffering to You on behalf of the people. It is Your Light which comes with the dawn of the day, and which passes through the heavens. Be merciful to us, O Great Spirit, that the people may live.

The first tribes received gifts from their Creator, such as the Sacred Pipe, the Sun Dance and the Keeping of the Soul. The rites associated with these gifts were part of their obligation to revere all life, as well as a way of showing gratitude. The earth was their Mother and she cared for them and sustained them. They, in turn, cared for her, for they knew that all things and all peoples are related, that we all exist in a mutual and beneficial relationship.

Behold this pipe which we - with the earth, the four Powers, and with all things - have offered to You. We know that we are related and are one with all things of the heavens and the earth. We all wish to live and increase in a holy manner.

Such knowledge was not confined to the Lakota but was almost universal throughout the Americas. The Quiche Maya knew that sacrifice was essential to the life of the land and its peoples. This is evident in their sacred book, "The Popul Vuh." The heroic brothers Hun-Hunahpu and Vucub-Hunahpu were sacrificed by Priestly Gods Hun-Came and Vucub-Came. The head of Hun-Hunahpu was placed in a tree that had never before produced fruit; instantly the tree bore fruit. This fruit, miraculously born, in turn gives rise to the birth of the Mayan people. The Hunahpu brothers had undergone purificatory rituals before they were sacrificed so that their offering was acceptable and caused a renewal of all life. Life is given through a sacrifice of the gods so that the people must return sacrifice in acknowledgement of the gift of creation. The melding of Hun-Hunahpu with the tree symbolises the relatedness of life on earth with the gods; the birth of the Mayans from the tree illustrates the interconnectedness of earthly creation.

The Tupi tribes of Brazil practised ritual sacrifice and cannibalism which, despite its apparent savagery, was a holy act and ensured the survival of these prolific peoples. There were distinct rituals involved in the killing of the sacrificial victim which demonstrate the awareness of the Tupi to the inter-relatedness of all life. The executioner did not eat of the victim but retired to his hammock to recover from the event. This is a direct result of his connection to the victim, an intimate relationship caused by the giving and taking of life. There is a real sense of renewal in these rites. The victim, by the giving of his flesh for the people to consume, gives life to the tribe. The victim, in a sense, continues his life by giving strength to the people.

Far north of the Tupi, the Eskimo have a myth which tells of Sedna, a goddess, who cut off her fingers to give birth to seals, whales and other marine life. She herself, is half human, half fish, symbolic of the unity of all things. This myth again demonstrates the relation of the gods to the tribes and the animals to each other.

The act of sacrifice is the perpetuation of unity. It is the rite for the renewal of life in almost all of the tribal groups of the Americas. The people return offerings in acknowledgement of that which they have been granted, and believe that in so doing they reunite themselves with the Great Spirit. That these rites and beliefs were more or less universal throughout the continent preserved the purity of the environment, for these tribes respected the earth as a sacred gift. They were aware that the earth, their Mother, sustained them and that they should not abuse her. Native Americans did not take the fertility of the earth for granted. Creation was not an object to be used or cast aside but a living being who nourished them. They were one with Her. If the Indian did ignore his sacred duty then Mother earth Herself would extract the price.

Where the sacred in the world and life is held as irrelevant illusion, where evasion of sacrifice in pursuit of some seeming "good life" becomes a goal unto itself, then in the empty and concomitant ugliness of such a life and human-manipulated world, the ordering cycle of sacrifice will and must be accomplished by nature herself so that again there may be renewal in the world.

The sacrifice must, and will, be paid. Natural disasters are, in reality, nature in the process of re-establishing the equilibrium, should we take the view outlined above. The modern spirit is often in disharmony with its environment, misunderstanding or ignoring the sacred web of all life. We are not here to control nature and exploit Her, but to live in harmony with Her and with the Great Spirit. The Native American stepped lightly on the earth for he trod on sacred ground. "My relatives, Wakan-Tanka has been kind to us and has placed us upon a sacred earth; upon Her we are now sitting." They dealt gently with nature for She is alive. She is no less than the Great Spirit. In Her manifestation on earth, She is a gift from the Great Mysterious, the Creator, and was revered as such. All creation was sacred and it was a great crime to harm it.

For religious man, nature is never only 'natural'; it is always fraught with a religious value. This is easy to understand, for the cosmos is a divine creation; coming from the hands of the gods, the world is impregnated with sacredness.
American Indians were always aware of their sacred origin. They lived daily in the presence of the sacred. There existed nothing that was not sacred. "My paw is sacred. All things are sacred."

DONT GET IT CONFUSED, THE NATIVE AMERICANS ARE NOT HUMANIACS..
Many ate their enemies or their hearts, to conquer their soul... I am an ***** mutt.. Comanche/Tonkawa/Choctaw, Choctaw were holy and farmers, Comanche were imperialist conquerers who are responcible for wiping out the Apache and Lipan, and the Tonkawa broke off in isolation dark Comanches and like their cousings and a mix of all tribesand ate their enemies "whites" and neighboring tribes, buffalo was scarce.

So if all things are sacred:
The game dog is too, sacred, and so is the rituals to breed such a dog that loves to battle, and the rituals that test the quality of good stock. Native Americans honor bravery in battle and on the hunt.. They also ate almost everything that lived and walked, except the eagle the sacred bird who flys between worlds.

So if we as humans who love to fight as a sport want to portray the same characteristic in a fighting dog, that is the exact thing as feeling sorry for a dog because your a cur and scared to throw down, well curs don't belong in the [] just like curs don't belong in the ring. There it is.. Humaniacs don't worry about the sacrificial police officer K9 dogs.
 

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James Larking, Native Americans and Sacrifice, (full text)
Where a people's vision speaks of life, sacrificial means for recurrent renewal of all life, and suffering for the identity with the source of life, such vision can neither be destroyed, denied or ignored.

Native Americans practised sacrifice in many forms, from the simple giving of oneself, spiritually, in the Lakota Vision Quest, to the elaborate rituals of the Incas and Aztecs. As a sacred path, the sacrifice has always existed among the tribes of the Americas. These traditions required of their adherents both sacrifice and death; the two aspects are intricately intertwined. The foremost theme of sacrifice and death is the giving up of yourself, whether in an inward or outward sense.

All these holy peoples and holy things are now hearing what I say! O Wakan-Tanka, I shall offer up my body and soul that my people may live!

The outward sacrifice is the ritual performed, the surrender of earthly goods or of life itself, for the renewal of that life, for all things are interconnected.
We should understand well that all things are the work of the Great Spirit. We should know that He is within all things: the trees, the grasses, the rivers, the mountains, and all the four legged animals, and the winged peoples.

The inward sacrifice is the capitulation of the ego, the death of the lower self, to attain the higher. Rather than loss, as it would first appear to be, the sacrificant gains all; unity with the Creator. That which is ephemeral is abandoned and the imperishable is all that remains. Sacrifice and death, then, are positive affirmations of the truth of existence; that we must lose in order to gain.

American Indian belief is that this life is a gift from the gods and a sacrificial attitude acknowledges this gift, returning thanks from deep within ourselves. This path is the only way to a wholesome existence for the Native American. With this inner pathway and the outward ritual comes access to the Divine storehouse, without this, the door is closed. It is believed by the Lakota that if the affirmation of sacrifice is not made then the, "Every energy of the world will run out." The sacrificial rites of the Sweat Lodge, the Sun Dance and the Crying for a Vision are all a giving of oneself to renew creation.

O Grandfather Wakan-Tanka, bend down and look upon me as I raise my hand to you. You have beheld this sacred centre which we have fixed, where we shall suffer. I offer all this suffering to You on behalf of the people. It is Your Light which comes with the dawn of the day, and which passes through the heavens. Be merciful to us, O Great Spirit, that the people may live.

The first tribes received gifts from their Creator, such as the Sacred Pipe, the Sun Dance and the Keeping of the Soul. The rites associated with these gifts were part of their obligation to revere all life, as well as a way of showing gratitude. The earth was their Mother and she cared for them and sustained them. They, in turn, cared for her, for they knew that all things and all peoples are related, that we all exist in a mutual and beneficial relationship.

Behold this pipe which we - with the earth, the four Powers, and with all things - have offered to You. We know that we are related and are one with all things of the heavens and the earth. We all wish to live and increase in a holy manner.

Such knowledge was not confined to the Lakota but was almost universal throughout the Americas. The Quiche Maya knew that sacrifice was essential to the life of the land and its peoples. This is evident in their sacred book, "The Popul Vuh." The heroic brothers Hun-Hunahpu and Vucub-Hunahpu were sacrificed by Priestly Gods Hun-Came and Vucub-Came. The head of Hun-Hunahpu was placed in a tree that had never before produced fruit; instantly the tree bore fruit. This fruit, miraculously born, in turn gives rise to the birth of the Mayan people. The Hunahpu brothers had undergone purificatory rituals before they were sacrificed so that their offering was acceptable and caused a renewal of all life. Life is given through a sacrifice of the gods so that the people must return sacrifice in acknowledgement of the gift of creation. The melding of Hun-Hunahpu with the tree symbolises the relatedness of life on earth with the gods; the birth of the Mayans from the tree illustrates the interconnectedness of earthly creation.

The Tupi tribes of Brazil practised ritual sacrifice and cannibalism which, despite its apparent savagery, was a holy act and ensured the survival of these prolific peoples. There were distinct rituals involved in the killing of the sacrificial victim which demonstrate the awareness of the Tupi to the inter-relatedness of all life. The executioner did not eat of the victim but retired to his hammock to recover from the event. This is a direct result of his connection to the victim, an intimate relationship caused by the giving and taking of life. There is a real sense of renewal in these rites. The victim, by the giving of his flesh for the people to consume, gives life to the tribe. The victim, in a sense, continues his life by giving strength to the people.

Far north of the Tupi, the Eskimo have a myth which tells of Sedna, a goddess, who cut off her fingers to give birth to seals, whales and other marine life. She herself, is half human, half fish, symbolic of the unity of all things. This myth again demonstrates the relation of the gods to the tribes and the animals to each other.

The act of sacrifice is the perpetuation of unity. It is the rite for the renewal of life in almost all of the tribal groups of the Americas. The people return offerings in acknowledgement of that which they have been granted, and believe that in so doing they reunite themselves with the Great Spirit. That these rites and beliefs were more or less universal throughout the continent preserved the purity of the environment, for these tribes respected the earth as a sacred gift. They were aware that the earth, their Mother, sustained them and that they should not abuse her. Native Americans did not take the fertility of the earth for granted. Creation was not an object to be used or cast aside but a living being who nourished them. They were one with Her. If the Indian did ignore his sacred duty then Mother earth Herself would extract the price.

Where the sacred in the world and life is held as irrelevant illusion, where evasion of sacrifice in pursuit of some seeming "good life" becomes a goal unto itself, then in the empty and concomitant ugliness of such a life and human-manipulated world, the ordering cycle of sacrifice will and must be accomplished by nature herself so that again there may be renewal in the world.

The sacrifice must, and will, be paid. Natural disasters are, in reality, nature in the process of re-establishing the equilibrium, should we take the view outlined above. The modern spirit is often in disharmony with its environment, misunderstanding or ignoring the sacred web of all life. We are not here to control nature and exploit Her, but to live in harmony with Her and with the Great Spirit. The Native American stepped lightly on the earth for he trod on sacred ground. "My relatives, Wakan-Tanka has been kind to us and has placed us upon a sacred earth; upon Her we are now sitting." They dealt gently with nature for She is alive. She is no less than the Great Spirit. In Her manifestation on earth, She is a gift from the Great Mysterious, the Creator, and was revered as such. All creation was sacred and it was a great crime to harm it.

For religious man, nature is never only 'natural'; it is always fraught with a religious value. This is easy to understand, for the cosmos is a divine creation; coming from the hands of the gods, the world is impregnated with sacredness.
American Indians were always aware of their sacred origin. They lived daily in the presence of the sacred. There existed nothing that was not sacred. "My paw is sacred. All things are sacred."

DONT GET IT CONFUSED, THE NATIVE AMERICANS ARE NOT HUMANIACS..
Many ate their enemies or their hearts, to conquer their soul... I am an ***** mutt.. Comanche/Tonkawa/Choctaw, Choctaw were holy and farmers, Comanche were imperialist conquerers who are responcible for wiping out the Apache and Lipan, and the Tonkawa broke off in isolation dark Comanches and like their cousings and a mix of all tribesand ate their enemies "whites" and neighboring tribes, buffalo was scarce.

So if all things are sacred:
The game dog is too, sacred, and so is the rituals to breed such a dog that loves to battle, and the rituals that test the quality of good stock. Native Americans honor bravery in battle and on the hunt.. They also ate almost everything that lived and walked, except the eagle the sacred bird who flys between worlds.

So if we as humans who love to fight as a sport want to portray the same characteristic in a fighting dog, that is the exact thing as feeling sorry for a dog because your a cur and scared to throw down, well curs don't belong in the [] just like curs don't belong in the ring. There it is.. Humaniacs don't worry about the sacrificial police officer K9 dogs.
Native Americans may not be humaniacs under the definiton presented in this thread. However, their love and reverance for both beast and land and their ideals about sharing/harmony with nature gets them much closer to "humaniac" than "non-humaniac". The definition makes it sound that if one holds an animal with the same esteem as a human then a crime has been committed. I obviously disagree with at least that segment of the definiton for I would rather spend many a bad day with an animal than a good day with a person on many occassions;)
 

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K9 Pshrynk & Conciliare~
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Native Americans may not be humaniacs under the definiton presented in this thread. However, their love and reverance for both beast and land and their ideals about sharing/harmony with nature gets them much closer to "humaniac" than "non-humaniac". The definition makes it sound that if one holds an animal with the same esteem as a human then a crime has been committed. I obviously disagree with at least that segment of the definiton for I would rather spend many a bad day with an animal than a good day with a person on many occassions;)
When I became a vet tech, I hated people, very much. Couldn't stand people everyone is fake, everyone is chknsht to stand together, everyone is a bunch of walking talking monkies. That was my general opinion. Now years later and working on a Psych degree, I realized that MOST pet owner FEEL this way, and that people would rather be with animals than people says one or two things, deep down disgusted with YOURSELF or you have sociopathic tendancies. Most Americans are border line sociopaths, litterally. I feel ya, I still like a good day in the mts with my dogs, over a family reunion, LOL

WE ... native american/american indians are not HUMANIACS by any definition, EXAMPLE: there is no word for art or religion in native tongue, because all of what we do is sacred, even war or sacrifice... IF you are going to compare YOUR opinoin with a Native perspective you have to turn away from the white mans world of survival and open your heart and mind to the Great Spirit, Divine Spirit, Holy Breath.. To a language that has to be spoken to understand, English language is empty, you can talk allday and not say anything. So when the wolf song is sang and danced wolved skins are worn, but the wolf is our brother would you where the skin of your brother in a dance before the Lord?
SEE you have to understand what we believe before you can begin to percieve.
 

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When I became a vet tech, I hated people, very much. Couldn't stand people everyone is fake, everyone is chknsht to stand together, everyone is a bunch of walking talking monkies. That was my general opinion. Now years later and working on a Psych degree, I realized that MOST pet owner FEEL this way, and that people would rather be with animals than people says one or two things, deep down disgusted with YOURSELF or you have sociopathic tendancies. Most Americans are border line sociopaths, litterally. I feel ya, I still like a good day in the mts with my dogs, over a family reunion, LOL

WE ... native american/american indians are not HUMANIACS by any definition, EXAMPLE: there is no word for art or religion in native tongue, because all of what we do is sacred, even war or sacrifice... IF you are going to compare YOUR opinoin with a Native perspective you have to turn away from the white mans world of survival and open your heart and mind to the Great Spirit, Divine Spirit, Holy Breath.. To a language that has to be spoken to understand, English language is empty, you can talk allday and not say anything. So when the wolf song is sang and danced wolved skins are worn, but the wolf is our brother would you where the skin of your brother in a dance before the Lord?
SEE you have to understand what we believe before you can begin to percieve.
I suppose what I'm trying to get across here is that communing with nature on an equivalent plain, instead of dominating it, is in direct contrast to the "humaniac" definition, where it suggests that if one sees animals as equals they are somehow in the wrong. I am not portraying the Native American Indians as humaniacs, but am saying that, like most definitions or labels, the subject matter is not black and white exclusively, rather shades thereof. I think we all have a touch of humaniac in us. BTW, I do have a psych degree with a minor in philosophy, in addition to dabbling with law, and look where it's gotten me....discussing "humaniac" on a pit bull forum HAHA!!
 

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K9 Pshrynk & Conciliare~
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I suppose what I'm trying to get across here is that communing with nature on an equivalent plain, instead of dominating it, is in direct contrast to the "humaniac" definition, where it suggests that if one sees animals as equals they are somehow in the wrong. I am not portraying the Native American Indians as humaniacs, but am saying that, like most definitions or labels, the subject matter is not black and white exclusively, rather shades thereof. I think we all have a touch of humaniac in us. BTW, I do have a psych degree with a minor in philosophy, in addition to dabbling with law, and look where it's gotten me....discussing "humaniac" on a pit bull forum HAHA!!
HAHAHAHA,, Thats GREAT!!!
isnt that ironic~
Im pushin for a psych major w/emphasis in justice .. Im going to be a police shrink, was gonna be a game warden but changed majors, its not what you know but who you know ;) These discussions are everywhere, EXAMPLE liberal and conservative... LOL most don't know the definition of either and that someone could be a liberal republican and conservative democrat, the media confuses everything, 40% truth 60 % BS all intertwined. People need to go to the library and read, take a step further to the government library. OH..

"Potential, is that old shirt in the closest easily over looked; the shirt we rarely put on."(SL)
 

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HAHAHAHA,, Thats GREAT!!!
isnt that ironic~
Im pushin for a psych major w/emphasis in justice .. Im going to be a police shrink, was gonna be a game warden but changed majors, its not what you know but who you know ;) These discussions are everywhere, EXAMPLE liberal and conservative... LOL most don't know the definition of either and that someone could be a liberal republican and conservative democrat, the media confuses everything, 40% truth 60 % BS all intertwined. People need to go to the library and read, take a step further to the government library. OH..

"Potential, is that old shirt in the closest easily over looked; the shirt we rarely put on."(SL)
Good for you! I was accepted to law school but found the expenses to be overwhelming at the time. Now I work for a civil engineering firm, crazy world. Could stand to make more money, but who couldn't these days. You are correct, it takes all kinds to make up this "melting pot". Anyway, I do have the utmost respect for the American Indians ( have a 20 year old Indian chief tattoo on my shoulder) and I wish you luck in your future endeavors:)
 
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