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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I hope this doesn't get be banned, spammed or run out on a rail, but I am an ACO in a ABT unfriendly city. My only involvement with Pits has been on the job. I've now run into the untrained, unmanageable Pits that attack the owner's children and eat the neighborhood dogs. I've also met some very sweet individuals that I've wanted to take home.

In this city any dog deemed to be a Pit, or shows 50% or more Pitbull traits is subject to a large fine, and must be removed from city limits. This leads to most Pits being unclaimed when they come in as strays. One thing that makes my job bearable is that our shelter has a very high live release rate (above 80% last year). Luckily, banned dogs are not euthed, they are transferred to Pit friendly communities for fostering until they are adopted.

I joined the forum to mostly lurk and try to learn a bit more about this breed. The biggest thing I have learned so far is understand the breed (any breed) and not put it into positions where it is likely to get into trouble. It sucks that so often the dogs pay for the owner's mistakes, and ignorance is no excuse.

It's very refreshing to hear discussion about how to handle the dogs' natural tendencies and manage aggression issues instead of denying they exist.
 

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The Yard Of Many Colors
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3,420 Posts
Welcome.. I hope you find what you are looking for and can come to understand the apbt better :D
 

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i doubt youve ever seen an american pit bull terrier. the 2nd most pedigreed animal on earth (2nd only to the human).

i dont hate you,if it ended up at a shelter its probably a mutt anyway and euthing it is probably best. if i met you in real life i would shake your hand, youre trying to learn about something without any kind of incentive or profit. good on you.

i like this site, youll get both sides of the coin and the whole perspective from both pet and working people.
 

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I wish more shelter and rescue people would do as you are and trying to educate themselves on the breed. So many Myths and false statistics get talked about in the media and alot of times coming from those of you working in the shelters. Hopefully you can learn a few things here and pass it along to the others who havent made an effort to understand them. I really hate how so many in the shelter system label dogs as bait dogs because it has some cuts or scars. This breed is known to be DA in alot of times and easily can just be a normal dog fight, doesnt always have to do with illegal dog fighting. Welcome to the forum, I dont think anyone hates you here I think we all probably feel the same . Happy you are here trying to understand the breed we all love and know to be the loyal , loving family dog they are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you : )

What I have seen so far is that they are a breed with very hard wired characteristics. If any other breed, be it a German Shepherd, a Labrador or Collie was bred to keep it's working traits, the dog would be prized. It seems with Pits it makes them demonized and feared.

As far as I know I haven't come across a purebred APBT, nor could anyone admit it to me. The dogs I see "appear" to have the traits that would class them in the banned dog category.

I appreciate the warm welcome though I can't agree with you zohawn; mutt or papered they are dogs,and one is no less deserving of finding a home. A key point in keeping a dog as pet is finding one that matched your interests and lifestyle. A mutt can fill that void just as well as any pedigreed animal. You may have a better idea of the background of the animal if it comes from a breeder, but that really only holds true if you have a found a good and honest breeder. The vast majority of the dogs that come through our kennels, both with breeder tattoos and without come with no known past. Breeding does increase the chances of certain characteristic being stronger, but nurture also plays a strong point. Two pups from the same litter, with different personalities and vastly different upbringings will result in two very different dogs.

Very often I see shy, meek people fall in love with a big strong dog. They want to adopt the 100 pound Mastiff cross but ask him to please slow down as he drags them along, or the sedentary older gentleman who wants a Border Collie because he thinks he wants to become more active. Intentions are wonderful, but action speaks louder. The wrong match will either end up with the dog being resented, ignored or moving on to yet another home.

You are right in that both sides of the coin are presented around here, and I am being enlightened more as I read. Thanks again!
 
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