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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So kilo, my 9 month old bully tore his acl. I was just wondering if anyone has encountered this with their dog, and if so what surgery did they recieve. I was told that there was a few to choose from and i just wanted any info that could help me... What surgery they had, how effective it was, etc. Anything..... Thanks guys.
 

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Kane tore his "acl" (in dogs, it's commonly referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament) earlier this year.

There are several options available to you, like you said. Some surgeries are typically better for some breeds than others.

One surgery involves tying sutures around the joint to act as a replacement ligament, as the body will start to form tissue over the suture. My vet in conjunction with the vets at a local teaching hospital didn't recommend this surgery for dogs over 30lbs or dogs who were still young and very active, as the sutures have a higher rate of being torn or re-torn down the line. That being said, however, I do know of a couple of larger dogs that had this surgery and are doing well with it; they have a little more arthritis and haven't regained 100% mobility from before the surgery but have recovered well for their needs. This surgery is typically cheaper than the other options because it's less invasive.

My boy had the next available surgery, a TPLO. This involves shaving bone off the tibia (or the shin bone) to reconfigure it so the joint is shaped properly and then installing a plate with a couple of pins to hold it in place. This surgery is generally recommended for the young, active dogs or those over 30lbs, decreases the amount of arthritis the dog will develop later on in life (depending on how soon you do the surgery) but is more expensive (I paid $3100, although I've seen prices across the country vary from $2200 all the way up to $6000).

The other option is a TTA. This is basically just a different way of doing the TPLO that is supposed to be a little better. It's usually a little more expensive, but not always.

Kane had his TPLO August 31st and, after having his x-ray to confirm the leg was healed properly on the 31st of October, was cleared to return to normal activity. He's running around the yard and being his normal self--less than 4 months after surgery. Of course, now that it's winter up here, his leg is a little stiff in the morning before he warms up and stretches the kinks out, and I do still have to restrict the amount of exercise he has. We can't go for mile+ walks or hikes or anything. He still needs a little more recovery time. But just around the house, he's no longer limping or hobbling around and he's using his leg the way he was before the surgery.

Whatever surgery option you choose, it's best to figure out your plan of action sooner rather than later. The longer you wait, the more the torn ligament scratches against the joint causing arthritis and possibly also tearing the miniscus.

One thing you can do now is get him started on a glucosamine/chondroitin supplement. Either Cosequin, Dasequin, or Glyco-flex III are good options. They have a guaranteed amount of those supplements which is better than you can get in the store and more effective. It takes about a month-month and a half to build up enough in the system, but once it does, you'll notice a difference.

There are a lot of other threads with this same topic in the forum that might have more information, look them up. Hope this helps.
 

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I have a dog who tore her ACL and it will be fixed in January. I am not going with the TTA or TPLO I am opting for stabilization surgery where they are going to do sutures on both sides of the knee to stabilize it. It's more complex than that but it was the best option for my working dog. What I do not like about the TOPL or TTA is they change the structure of the knee and basically unbalance it. Now for a pet I see no problem with that but for a sports dog it could be an issue and why I chose what I chose. 9 months is really young to tear it and the chance of it tearing again is high. How did your pup tear his ACL?

BTW the option I went with is 1600 and I did not go with it based on price it was just the better option for my dog.
 

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My 15 year old girl passed in April. She had her first TPLO at 2 and second at 3 and a half years old. It was the priciest option at the time, and my vet told me it would have the best long term effect. Never had ANY issues with her knees after the surgeries, I had them Xrayed every few years or so for peace of mind. I will do the same thing again for my new girls if they rupture their cruciates too.

I learned the hard way that more often than not, when one ACL goes the other will eventually follow.

+1 on the high quality glucosamine. Consider Cissus too, it is another great joint product that is really starting to get popular with human athletes. My old girl responded very well to it when her hips started to get arthritic, she would really start slowing down if I ran out of it for a few days.

Good luck with Kilo!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a dog who tore her ACL and it will be fixed in January. I am not going with the TTA or TPLO I am opting for stabilization surgery where they are going to do sutures on both sides of the knee to stabilize it. It's more complex than that but it was the best option for my working dog. What I do not like about the TOPL or TTA is they change the structure of the knee and basically unbalance it. Now for a pet I see no problem with that but for a sports dog it could be an issue and why I chose what I chose. 9 months is really young to tear it and the chance of it tearing again is high. How did your pup tear his ACL?

BTW the option I went with is 1600 and I did not go with it based on price it was just the better option for my dog.
Yes 9 months is so young!! He is a very very energetic dog. My next door neighbor has a few dogs and they like to run the fence line barking at one another. I don't think it was the running, but the abrupt stoping that might have done it. I mean he would be running full force and just stop abruptly at the end of the fence line. That's the only thing I can think of. I have thought of every thing else and nothing fits. He is not a working dog. He is just my big baby. The vet said the best option would be the TPLO. It just makes me nervous. The said for how big he is that this is the best for him. What else makes me nervous is that because how young he is he could possibly tear the same knee or maybe even the other one? Sigh..... Idk. I just want the best for him. And I dont want the vet to say the best is the TPLO because it's the most expensive surgery for him. There gonna charge me 3200 for this surgery for him. And if I'm gonna spend that much I hope it's the best for him. I'm also going to look into all the Joint products everyone has been mentioning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My 15 year old girl passed in April. She had her first TPLO at 2 and second at 3 and a half years old. It was the priciest option at the time, and my vet told me it would have the best long term effect. Never had ANY issues with her knees after the surgeries, I had them Xrayed every few years or so for peace of mind. I will do the same thing again for my new girls if they rupture their cruciates too.

I learned the hard way that more often than not, when one ACL goes the other will eventually follow.

+1 on the high quality glucosamine. Consider Cissus too, it is another great joint product that is really starting to get popular with human athletes. My old girl responded very well to it when her hips started to get arthritic, she would really start slowing down if I ran out of it for a few days.

Good luck with Kilo!
Thank you!
 
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