Go Pitbull Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
when i take my dog out to pee or to go on walks she'll pull me on the leash and the older she gets the harder it is. can you please help? shes still a puppy 5 1/2 months but i dont want this to continue and having to put up with it lol. and she also gets hyper somtimes and just starts pulling alot and then when i let her loose in the house she runs like crazy. do you think thats the puppy in her? thankyou!
 

· Work them Pet Bulls!
Joined
·
3,950 Posts
You need to take her to a basic obedience class with a knowledgeable trainer who is familiar with bully breeds. My girl is a month older than yours and she doesn't pull at all and responds to heel when we walk. I don't use any choke chains, prong collars, or harness just a good ole flat collar. We have been going to OB classes for two months though. Its all repetition and how much you are willing to work with her. She is a puppy and they act a fool without being taught basic manners and OB. There are a couple of great trainers on here that will hopefully reply and give some better advice :D
 

· Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Right now would be a good time to train her to walk next to you. Never let her get in front of you. You could take her to some OB classes if you're not confident enough to train her or what not. If you're familiar with training collars you could start with them everyone has their own opinions on them however if you're comfortable with them you could use them to help you out with her. I started teaching my dog about 4 months old just because it was more comfortable for me with her height. And she got it in less then a week. I did use a training collar for corrections only, glad to say she never really needed corrections. Teaching your dog as well the "leave it command" will help you out a lot during walks.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
My pup is about the same age as your pup and last week we started obedience class (she has only had one class so far) and our trainer taught us to use praise, treats and the word here. When the pup starts to pull, walk in the other direction, say here and as soon as the leash goes limp praise like crazy and treat. After only one class and working at home it is working for my girl. I'm not saying she doesn't pull all of the time, but it is better (my pup loves sticks and gets excited when she sees one and wants to get to it. That's where leave it us helping.) Hope that helps. By no means am I an expert. I have even changed direction without saying a thing and she has stated by my side. She is a lot better when she knows I have treats in my pocket.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
775 Posts
When she pull stop. When she catches on begin to move again. Repeat when she does it again. Think about a martingale if needed. Onyx would lead with standard type collar. Martingale and frequent long walks corrected onyx leading at a early age
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,448 Posts
An obed class is always a good idea but at that age you could put a small prong collar and have it a little big so it corrects he when she pulls. At that age I would not pop her not to pull I would just let her hit the end of the leash and feel the correction and decide she does not want to pull against it. In an Obed class then you can teach her not to pull. When my pups start to pull real hard I will use prong collars just so they do not drag me.

One thing you can try first is when she pulls pop the leash back, it has to be a good pop so if the leash it tight create slack real quick and then snap back. If that does not work then move to the prong but at this age do not pop the prong just let her decide it is not comfortable to pull on the prongs.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
854 Posts
One thing you can try first is when she pulls pop the leash back, it has to be a good pop so if the leash it tight create slack real quick and then snap back. If that does not work then move to the prong but at this age do not pop the prong just let her decide it is not comfortable to pull on the prongs.
I don't have the money for Obed. classes. So, I've done the "poping the leash back" and z still pulls, like hes overwhelmed w/ excitement and smells and peeing. I was going to do the prong collar, but isn't it painful? and If i do get the collar, how soon would it work? (Thanks for starting this threadd! and for advice!)
 

· English Dogge Yard
Joined
·
3,447 Posts
The prong collar doesn't hurt the dog, it doesn't "dig in" as i've heard many people say is the reason why they don't use them. What it does is deliver a pinch when the correction takes place if properly used. I've used it on several dogs including my own with zero harm done. I still use mine occasionally even though they are trained depending on where we go as a just incase collar, otherwise i use 2 - 2.5'' thick D ring collars.

If you were interested in using a prong collar i would recommend talking to someone locally that can show you exactly how it should be used, or, if you learn quickly watch a few "how to" videos online to see how a properly fit prong is supposed to be worn and the proper methods of correction when used.

Training tools and collars are only useful if used properly. Anything can be used wrong and cause harm to your dogs.
 

· English Dogge Yard
Joined
·
3,447 Posts
I don't have the money for Obed. classes. So, I've done the "poping the leash back" and z still pulls, like hes overwhelmed w/ excitement and smells and peeing. I was going to do the prong collar, but isn't it painful? and If i do get the collar, how soon would it work? (Thanks for starting this threadd! and for advice!)
Oh and if used properly the correction process would be fairly instant, however the actual training process to have your dog listen to you and your commands while walking will vary and take patience.
 

· Jr MEMBER
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
You can easily, easily train a dog to walk properly on the leash without any corrections.... Dakota used to be a monster puller. Not anymore.

Get some treats, and start off in a small area without any distractions. Walk away from your dog so that the leash lightly tightens (No real force, just enough for them to notice the tightening of the leash). If they come towards you treat and reward, if they don't call them. (Make sure not to repeat their name over and over, it could lose the meaning. Kissing sounds, and stuff like that are ideal.)

This is a good time to learn a marker too. Say "yes" the exact moment the dog does what you want then reward. You can use a clicker, but I prefer hands free that's just me. Make sure whatever you use fro the marker that you reward every time you say it. And say it first then go for the treat, don't go for the treat first.

Now, continue to walk in different directions and mark "yes" each time they come to you. They're learning to go with the leash.

After they've got that down go on a walk. Mark and reward for eye contact and when the leash is lose. When you first start out reward frequently, then slowly increase the time in between rewards for staying on a lose leash. If they start to pull, stop, walk back and call them. Reward when they come back, then continue forward. Rinse and repeat. You can also try just pulling the leash slightly and calling them while walking or standing and reward. They'll learn that if the leash is tight to turn back to you.

It only took my boy 5 sessions to get it. I don't have to bring treats on walks, he walks loose, if he gets to far ahead, I stop and he turns back to me. If I stop while he's on a loose lead he'll stop too. He learned to pay attention to my movements.

;)
 

· English Dogge Yard
Joined
·
3,447 Posts
You can easily, easily train a dog to walk properly on the leash without any corrections.... Dakota used to be a monster puller. Not anymore.

Get some treats, and start off in a small area without any distractions. Walk away from your dog so that the leash lightly tightens (No real force, just enough for them to notice the tightening of the leash). If they come towards you treat and reward, if they don't call them. (Make sure not to repeat their name over and over, it could lose the meaning. Kissing sounds, and stuff like that are ideal.)

This is a good time to learn a marker too. Say "yes" the exact moment the dog does what you want then reward. You can use a clicker, but I prefer hands free that's just me. Make sure whatever you use fro the marker that you reward every time you say it. And say it first then go for the treat, don't go for the treat first.

Now, continue to walk in different directions and mark "yes" each time they come to you. They're learning to go with the leash.

After they've got that down go on a walk. Mark and reward for eye contact and when the leash is lose. When you first start out reward frequently, then slowly increase the time in between rewards for staying on a lose leash. If they start to pull, stop, walk back and call them. Reward when they come back, then continue forward. Rinse and repeat. You can also try just pulling the leash slightly and calling them while walking or standing and reward. They'll learn that if the leash is tight to turn back to you.

It only took my boy 5 sessions to get it. I don't have to bring treats on walks, he walks loose, if he gets to far ahead, I stop and he turns back to me. If I stop while he's on a loose lead he'll stop too. He learned to pay attention to my movements.

;)
While this works or some, it may not work for others. It doesn't just follow with breed to breed but individual dog to dog. Some dogs may benefit and learn quickly with this, others need more in terms of correction and training tools such as prong, slip, etc.

I have had one dog that would properly learn to walk on a leash as you have described, any game dogs i've owned or my current dogs now needed more discipline, "harder" and always consistent for them to fully begin to learn. By harder i mean methods using a prong properly.

Drives, leash reactive, dog reactive, DA severity, etc all goes into play when training and you can take two similar behaved dogs, same breed but both needs separate training methods for success.

The OP's dog may need something in terms of what you have suggested, how i suggested or a middle a ground of some sort.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,448 Posts
You can easily, easily train a dog to walk properly on the leash without any corrections.... Dakota used to be a monster puller. Not anymore.

Get some treats, and start off in a small area without any distractions. Walk away from your dog so that the leash lightly tightens (No real force, just enough for them to notice the tightening of the leash). If they come towards you treat and reward, if they don't call them. (Make sure not to repeat their name over and over, it could lose the meaning. Kissing sounds, and stuff like that are ideal.)

This is a good time to learn a marker too. Say "yes" the exact moment the dog does what you want then reward. You can use a clicker, but I prefer hands free that's just me. Make sure whatever you use fro the marker that you reward every time you say it. And say it first then go for the treat, don't go for the treat first.

Now, continue to walk in different directions and mark "yes" each time they come to you. They're learning to go with the leash.

After they've got that down go on a walk. Mark and reward for eye contact and when the leash is lose. When you first start out reward frequently, then slowly increase the time in between rewards for staying on a lose leash. If they start to pull, stop, walk back and call them. Reward when they come back, then continue forward. Rinse and repeat. You can also try just pulling the leash slightly and calling them while walking or standing and reward. They'll learn that if the leash is tight to turn back to you.

It only took my boy 5 sessions to get it. I don't have to bring treats on walks, he walks loose, if he gets to far ahead, I stop and he turns back to me. If I stop while he's on a loose lead he'll stop too. He learned to pay attention to my movements.

;)
What till you get your first APBT and you will see that does not work for all dogs! ;) That method is great for dogs who are biddable and easy to train, APBT seems to just be the opposite of that. I do not use prong collars on all dogs or breeds when I train. Prongs are great but they are a quick fix and many people will always have to use them if they do not teach the dog how to walk properly. There is a few ways I would recommend. The way I do it is I teach heeling with food and to pay attention to me. This takes a long time and really helps with pulling in a controlled environment. You can use a prong but if you do not do the ground work you will always have to use a prong. You can give little pops on a flat or correction collar, one of the pit puppies in my class who is 5 months old is on a prong collar but the prong is on inside out so it is a martingale and it works great. Later on when she gets older and that is not as effective we will put it on the right way.

We have a ton of new trainers at our obedience club that teach that all motivation and correction method and what a bunch of crap dogs!! They have no control over their own dogs as far as manners because god forbid you tell the dogs no. While the dogs may work ok in Obed they still have a lot of problems with control but they also have a lot of really biddable dogs. I watch them in class and when they have a dog who is not food or toy motivated they have no clue what to do and tell the people they cannot help them. To me that is not training! Also they cannot control harder dogs like APBT's because their methods do not work for many dogs. They again just tell the owners they cannot help them. One time they got mad because I was correcting my dog on the prong to let go of his toy. I said if you think there is a better way by all means go ahead and show me. I gave them Barca and his toy, she got out some really good treats and tried to trade him for the toy. He held on tighter! She tired to wait him out to see if he would let go..... after 8 mins she gave up. Then she tried opening his mouth, he clamped down tighter, she tried offering another toy, NOPE. She got really and then proceeded to tell me there was something wrong with my dog! LMAO sorry sweet cheeks it just proves your method does not work on all dogs!

Sorry this new age methods just drive me nuts! I think there should be a balance of correction and praise.

I am open minded when it comes to training and I love going to seminars and learning new things but if the methods is no correction or never tell them they are wrong I have issues with that. I would love to see someone put that to use on a dog like Barca or most the dogs in my kennel. Not going to happen.

Back to the OP if you want to fix the pulling today use a prong, it is easy and will fix your pup pulling. As long as the puppy is not over reactive to the collar you are fine. If the puppy gets corrected and gets scared and clays down or does not want to walk then try flipping it inside out or get a chain martingale and pop is she pulls. This should be an easy fix and if you ever have the money go to an obedience class it is worth it.
 

· Jr MEMBER
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
I understand, but why jump to the conclusion that this dog is that hard? He could be very biddable, I've worked with countless APBTs who are very biddable.

IMO the correction method should be suggested last and more of a last resort, nothing in the OP's post says the dog is not biddable considering how the dog was handled and trained wasn't explained.

Another thing to keep in mind that I see sooooo many owners do is keep the dog on a constantly short leash. Let them have a longer leash so they can learn the difference between tight and loose.

;)
 

· English Dogge Yard
Joined
·
3,447 Posts
What till you get your first APBT and you will see that does not work for all dogs! ;) That method is great for dogs who are biddable and easy to train, APBT seems to just be the opposite of that. I do not use prong collars on all dogs or breeds when I train. Prongs are great but they are a quick fix and many people will always have to use them if they do not teach the dog how to walk properly. There is a few ways I would recommend. The way I do it is I teach heeling with food and to pay attention to me. This takes a long time and really helps with pulling in a controlled environment. You can use a prong but if you do not do the ground work you will always have to use a prong. You can give little pops on a flat or correction collar, one of the pit puppies in my class who is 5 months old is on a prong collar but the prong is on inside out so it is a martingale and it works great. Later on when she gets older and that is not as effective we will put it on the right way.

We have a ton of new trainers at our obedience club that teach that all motivation and correction method and what a bunch of crap dogs!! They have no control over their own dogs as far as manners because god forbid you tell the dogs no. While the dogs may work ok in Obed they still have a lot of problems with control but they also have a lot of really biddable dogs. I watch them in class and when they have a dog who is not food or toy motivated they have no clue what to do and tell the people they cannot help them. To me that is not training! Also they cannot control harder dogs like APBT's because their methods do not work for many dogs. They again just tell the owners they cannot help them. One time they got mad because I was correcting my dog on the prong to let go of his toy. I said if you think there is a better way by all means go ahead and show me. I gave them Barca and his toy, she got out some really good treats and tried to trade him for the toy. He held on tighter! She tired to wait him out to see if he would let go..... after 8 mins she gave up. Then she tried opening his mouth, he clamped down tighter, she tried offering another toy, NOPE. She got really and then proceeded to tell me there was something wrong with my dog! LMAO sorry sweet cheeks it just proves your method does not work on all dogs!

Sorry this new age methods just drive me nuts! I think there should be a balance of correction and praise.

I am open minded when it comes to training and I love going to seminars and learning new things but if the methods is no correction or never tell them they are wrong I have issues with that. I would love to see someone put that to use on a dog like Barca or most the dogs in my kennel. Not going to happen.

Back to the OP if you want to fix the pulling today use a prong, it is easy and will fix your pup pulling. As long as the puppy is not over reactive to the collar you are fine. If the puppy gets corrected and gets scared and clays down or does not want to walk then try flipping it inside out or get a chain martingale and pop is she pulls. This should be an easy fix and if you ever have the money go to an obedience class it is worth it.
:goodpost::clap:
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,448 Posts
I understand, but why jump to the conclusion that this dog is that hard? He could be very biddable, I've worked with countless APBTs who are very biddable.

IMO the correction method should be suggested last and more of a last resort, nothing in the OP's post says the dog is not biddable considering how the dog was handled and trained wasn't explained.

Another thing to keep in mind that I see sooooo many owners do is keep the dog on a constantly short leash. Let them have a longer leash so they can learn the difference between tight and loose.

;)
If you read the original post I made I suggested a prong collar with no correction. Let the dog pull against the leash and correct it's self. Unless I really had a hard head I would not jerk a 5 months old puppy around but letting them learn not to pull by getting uncomfortable on the prong is perfectly fine no matter what type of pup you have. What you have to learn is how to give advice. What is the owner looking for? in this case a quick fix to pulling and a prong does just that with very little know how from the owner. Is this how I train my puppies or classes? No, it is not but I do not have the time to give lessons over the internet.
Next when you suggest something because it worked for your dog (not you but in general) that is ok but not all dogs are the same and a practical approach works best.

I know you have worked with many dogs but I have been training just about as long as you have been alive ;) I have worked with thousands of dogs over the years and learned many different ways to work with dogs and what to expect from the majority of dog breeds. I am not saying I know it all, if I did I would be full of it! But experience has taught me to not always explain things the way I would do it but rather what is easier for the John Q public to do with some success. Now for how I teach my dogs not to pull and how to heel I have a thread in the Schutzhund forum that is a sticky that talks about motivational heeling and that is what I do.

Putting a younger dog on a prong collar and letting them learn not to pull is perfectly fine and what the average pet owner can do easily with little aggravation. Now like I said before if the pup freaks out or won't move after getting self corrected then you should use a different type collar. Most pups especially pit pups this works just fine with no demotivation to the puppy. Prong are great if used correctly just like any other training tool and easy for the general public to use.

Tips for fitting a prong for a younger dog is let it be a little lose not tight under the neck like I would for an adult. If it is loser it is less correction, you can also put the collar on a dead ring. Dead ring means when you attach the leash put it on both hoops. The 5th picture in this link shows what a dead ring looks like. This also shows the proper fit for a prong collar but for a puppy I would not use it that high on the neck to start out with. Also you would want to attack a lose slip chain as a back up if you use a prong collar. Prong collars can come undone and the slip would make sure if that happens you still have a hold of your pup. There is a picture of that as well.

Leerburg | How to fit a Prong Collar
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,448 Posts
I understand, but why jump to the conclusion that this dog is that hard? He could be very biddable, I've worked with countless APBTs who are very biddable.

IMO the correction method should be suggested last and more of a last resort, nothing in the OP's post says the dog is not biddable considering how the dog was handled and trained wasn't explained.

Another thing to keep in mind that I see sooooo many owners do is keep the dog on a constantly short leash. Let them have a longer leash so they can learn the difference between tight and loose.

;)
I also have very biddable dogs but still rock heads meaning I need more correction. Siren I can look at her wrong and that is enough correction if her drive is low, she is extremely biddable. When she is doing Schutzhund and her drive is really high I need an E collar on about 90 to get my point across. Still a really biddable dog but different correction level when her drive is that high. I would like someone to ask her politely to let go of the Schutzhund sleeve.... lol
 

· Jr MEMBER
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
Even if the dog is correcting itself, it is still a correction. And still, I would suggest the other route first and if it failed go to the other.

It only took 4 sessions with my boy and others it took less, some more, some it took weeks. It can be a "quick fix" if the owner is willing to be consistent. Which, is why I would learn more about the OP before suggesting any other methods.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,448 Posts
We have to agree to disagree, again my experience come from year with working with dogs and letting a pup self correct there is nothing wrong. Just because it worked with your dog does not mean it would work on all dogs. You will learn this as you continue your training, you are young and have a lot to learn. I have told you this before you remind me of me when I was your age, I started teaching classes training at about 17 after training a few of my own dogs. You will learn may method and I am not knocking your suggestion just saying there is an easier way for the general public to keep a pup from pulling. Your suggestion is fine and based off what works for you dog and your limited experience working with dogs and there is nothing wrong with that. I would rather not fight or beat my head against the wall with teaching a pup not to pull. Put a prong and end of story you have a happy little pup who does not pull and you can go on a nice walk with little effort. Happy ending for all.
 

· Jr MEMBER
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
Oh and just to clarify, I never implied that I thought it would work just because it worked with my dog. And I fully grasp that dogs are individuals. I was just using it as an example.
Just to be clear I've used it on at least a hundred dogs in my 2 years at the shelter, not just my own dog.

I shall agree to disagree. lol ;)
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,448 Posts
You have much to learn and I will say one thing and you will learn this as you grow in your training. The only thing 2 trainers can agree on is what the third trainer is doing wrong! This is so true, every one has their own way of doing things and even my best friend and I disagree many times. We train very similar but many times we argue about methods and what works better. I never knock a method as wrong unless it just does not make sense but I have my own opinions on what is better and so do other trainers. When you start working with the public you will also learn how hard it is to tell some one how to do something even if you demo it 10 times they still will not get it!! You will figure out how dumb and uncoordinated the masses are and why what worked for you at the shelter may not work for someone who does not have the skills that you do. That is why I suggested an easy fix with the prong because any one can do that with little effort. Remember what works for us will not work for some less skilled that does not have the experience to problem solve if they have an issue. Those few hundred dogs you worked with were handled by you and how you got the experience but for a first time owner it is much different. Again you will learn how aggravating working with the public can be. You put on a smile, take a deep breath and help as much as you can ;)
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top