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Hello all! I have a 9 year old female pit, my sweet Sasha girl!! I adopted her 3 years ago from a shelter after she was almost starved to death by her previous owners. She is the sweetest most submissive dog I have ever had, everyone is shocked when they see how well she behaves (INSIDE)! Recently we have been having some backyard behavior issues. About 6 months ago we moved into a house, so she now has her own yard ( a first for us since I have had her). We have neighbors on both sides that have dogs with a chain link fence separating them. One side has 4 little yappers, all mixed breeds, possible chihuahua's, shitsu's and possibly a jack russell terrier. Sasha can not stand these little guys, one in particular she chases the fence line back and forth, this has lasted almost 30 minutes at one point. Once she is in full pursuit, I can not call her off the fence line as she no longer listens to anything I say, I have to catch her by the collar and drag her inside. After reading many post I now know that she is in charge of the backyard... that being said what suggestions do you have? I have a tie down that is connected to the porch which she now has a 25 foot radius to run on, but will bark none stop if the neighbor dogs are outside. This barking problem has now landed us a code compliance warning from the city we live in... next time will be a $500 fine! Pleaes help any and all suggestions are much appreciated!
 

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**Some additional information** Sasha is crate trained and is in her crate inside during the day while I am at work, if I am at home she is out of her crate and has free run of the house!
 

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There are bark collars, someone else posted something you can hang in your yard that deters them from barking. My boy has issue when he sees the other dogs. Is your fence see thorugh? can you put these in the fence? Slats for Chain Link Fence

I am kind of confused. If your dog is crated when you are not home, so I assume outside when you ARE home why are you not immediatly bringing him inside when he starts to bark? If he wants out bad enough he will learn to not bark or he gets rbought in.

you can also fill a can with a quarter penny nickle dime or 2 and tap the top and when he barks shake the can at him and tell him no bark. See if that might work. But yeah, I call on my neighbors all the time, took me 2 years of being woken up at 6am to fnally snap Tried the nice route, didn't work, I call AC now if they are out barking for more than 5 minutes. Screw barking dogs I don't need that crap! lol They finally got a $500 ticket. Do not put your dogs unsupervised if they are going to bark. My neighbor finally learned this and now she only puts them out after 7am and as soon as they bark she is ON IT! so you need to be ON IT! lol Now her dogs hardly ever bark non stop. i don't care about an occasional bark, its the none stop barks that get me down.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
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Thanks so much for the advice, I just ordered a bark collar and we shall see if it helps!

Yes sorry for the confusion, she is only outside when I am home and I am outside with her, I will try the coins in the can idea to see if that will deter her. As soon as she starts barking I do pull her inside, after me chasing her down for a few minutes. It really is a matter of me establishing the pack leader mentality outside as we have no problems in the house. When I got the notice, I had no clue the barking was an issue as she is never in the backyard for more than 30 minutes. I wish I would have gotten a nice courtesy "hey can you keep your dog quiet" as I didn't realize that dogs barking was a bother to them. I would have made an immediate effort to keep her quiet like I am now... I am doing the best as this is my first mommy role.. and I am learning as I go along! I do want the best for my dog and want to be a courteous neighbor as well!

Thanks again for all the advice! :)
 

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Good for you! Yeah the can might not work as well because outside the noise travels so it may not surprise her as much. But I love how this explains it, and if you are chasing your girl around I thought this might be helpful to start training as well. Once your dog knows what you are asking, she should only have to be told once. Do not ever call your dog if you do not want to go get her. You should not have to run around after her to get her inside. I have a tons of tricks I can share, but start with this one since it literally came up in my feed before I saw your post. :)

Good luck, keep us posted! and she sure is adorable! Sweet girl you have!

"The Come When Called Dilemma"

Well, there are a few common mistakes that people make with recalls that make a reliable recall next to impossible. 1) Not truly teaching it in the first place. 2) Only calling the dog when it's for something negative (i.e. coming in from outside, putting him in the crate, clipping his toenails, ending fun in general). 3) Repeating the cue over & over with no result, henceforth teaching the dog to IGNORE IT.

Let's discuss #1. First things first, you have to actually teach your dog come what "come" ("here!" "front!" choose your word) means. Here is a start: put your dog on a leash, so she can't wander or blow you off. Have a surprise treat on you, (treat doesn't have to = food. There is nothing better to my dog than a tug toy!). Wait until your dog is looking away from you, then call "[Dog's name], here!" and trot (yes, I said trot!) excitedly backwards while holding the leash. As soon as your dog commits to coming toward you, "GOOD GIRL!! YAY for you!!" and BIG party when she gets to you, including giving her the reward. Repear this exercise over and over again with your dog on a longer lead, go outside, add distractions, always rewarding her for coming to you. **Hint** Try to SURPRISE her with the reward, and vary them. IF your dog doesn't coming to you when you call, trot backwards while holding the leash so she has no choice but to come into you. Reward her when she gets there, even if you had to help in the beginning.

.... and #2. People have this habit of not teaching the cue in the first place, or teaching it 50%, and then only calling the dog when it's a convenience to the human, but sucky for the dog, i.e. if the only time you call your dog is when you want him to come in from playing outside, he's eventually going to equate that call with the ending of a good time WITH the added bonus that he's off leash and you can't enforce what you're saying. I call my dogs periodically when they're outside, give them an AWESOME treat, and send 'em back out again. Only 1 out of every maybe 10 times am I calling them to end the fun for good, and even then, I try to reward their compliance with something when we get back in the house. I want to keep their recalls enthusiastic! If you have to do something like trim his nails, put him in the tub, pick a tick off him, or any other unpleasant task, get up and GO GET HIM. If you call him for things that suck, eventually he is NOT (at the very least) going to be in a hurry to get to you, (and at worst, he's going to start running the other way when you call him).

#3: Repeating, repeating, repeating... There is a somewhat unwritten rule around here that you shouldn't GIVE a cue that you CANNOT or ARE NOT WILLING to enforce. For example, I had an ex-boyfriend who used to stand on the porch and call Spark Plug over and over, while standing on the porch nonetheless, while Spark was gallivanting off leash in the backyard. He called him repeatedly so many times that eventually Spark didn't respond to the word "come" anymore at all. He had effectively been trained to ignore it. (I call this phenomenon "anti-trained!") So what did I do? Started all the way back at step one and retrained my recall with a NEW cue; (now it's "here!"). If you recognize yourself here and have effectively trained your dog to ignore you calling him with "come," start over with a different cue like I did.

**Your dog should be wearing a long lead to practice this (supervised only with the leads, please) even in his own backyard until you are feeling SUPER confident and getting lightening-fast responses. What I did with my first dog, Caruso, was go from the 20 foot lead, to the 10, to the 6, to the 2, to the... you get the idea. If you call your dog to you someday AFTER YOU'VE SPENT A BUNCH OF TIME actually teaching him what "here" means before using the cue off leash, that is, and he doesn't respond, RESIST the urge to call him again. I've caught loose dogs by picking up a stick (or even an imaginary object) and waltz off acting like I'm having the time of my life with it, paying NO attention to the dog, except for out of the corner of my eye. Dog comes up to see what you're having so much fun with, and wa-la! There he is. Easiest way to get a loos dog to come to you is to get his attention and dash off in the opposite direction. They almost always follow.

**Continue to reward a good recall throughout your dog's life. I'm always saying, just because you KNOW how to do your job doesn't mean you're going to work for free. PAY the kid! Keep the reinforcement level high.

**This is by no means a completely comprehensive description of teaching a reliable come when called. Dogs vary a LOT in their motivations and what works and what doesn't and how difficult it is. Reach out to a fabulous professional trainer in your area to help you get a handle on the specifics, as this is a safety cue that could save your dog's life someday!

**One final thing, not for nothin', but I truly believe a good recall has a lot more to do with your RELATIONSHIP than it does a conditioned response to a cue ("come"). My dogs would never run away from me because they totally don't want to... We're best friends, we spend a ton of time together, they trust in my leadership, and they WANT to be with me.. I sure want to be with them ;)
 

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Really a fantastic post Ames. Thank you so much for taking the time. It is greatly appreciated.

Joe
 

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You cannot allow her to keep up this behavior and the only way to stop it is stop letting her practice it altogether. No more fence fighting or barking, she's leashed to you to go potty and goes in. If you take her out offleash be doing something with her, flirtpole, fetch, tug so she is not chasing the fenceline or barking. Do a long line until you are sure she will come to you if need be. Training a solid recall takes time and a lot of repetition. Pack leader crap is exactly that, crap. She's doing what dogs do because it's fun and reinforced and she runs from you because she isn't trained and knows you are going to end the fun.

You are lucky with only chain link one of the smaller dogs hasn't gotten hurt or she hasn't climbed it and gone after them, if I were you I would put up 6' privacy fence asap or get those tarp panels that obscure view and hopefully prevent any legs or muzzles going through. A similar situation just posted about on another forum and their pit bull ripped the leg off the neighbors schnauzer and killed it after repeated fence fighting. It's not something to play around with. Barking just stop letting her out unsupervised, she barks she goes inside, keep her on a long leash so she can't get away from you when you need to take her in.
 

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Thank you all for the advice! Yes she is now only going outside with a leash or on the lead, I have managed to distracted her by crinkling an emptied water bottle to stop the barking, and now working on distracting her with a surprise treat or her favorite toy, her rope thanks to AMES advice! and thank you GOING POSTAL, you gave me a different perspective I had not thought of that she is just being a dog and doing what is fun! Makes total sense! Thank you for your encouragement, your right the behavior has to stop now! She is very submissive and was eager to learn her tricks in the house, after reading all of this it seems that I am the one that was slacking on my momma duties assuming she knew how to behave in the backyard since she does so well inside! Will keep you all posted! Thanks again!
 

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Thank you all for the advice! Yes she is now only going outside with a leash or on the lead, I have managed to distracted her by crinkling an emptied water bottle to stop the barking, and now working on distracting her with a surprise treat or her favorite toy, her rope thanks to AMES advice! and thank you GOING POSTAL, you gave me a different perspective I had not thought of that she is just being a dog and doing what is fun! Makes total sense! Thank you for your encouragement, your right the behavior has to stop now! She is very submissive and was eager to learn her tricks in the house, after reading all of this it seems that I am the one that was slacking on my momma duties assuming she knew how to behave in the backyard since she does so well inside! Will keep you all posted! Thanks again!
Glad to hear it and glad it working out. She will get there as long as you keep at it!

Sent from Petguide.com App
 

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Hello all! I have a 9 year old female pit, my sweet Sasha girl!! I adopted her 3 years ago from a shelter after she was almost starved to death by her previous owners. She is the sweetest most submissive dog I have ever had, everyone is shocked when they see how well she behaves (INSIDE)! Recently we have been having some backyard behavior issues. About 6 months ago we moved into a house, so she now has her own yard ( a first for us since I have had her). We have neighbors on both sides that have dogs with a chain link fence separating them. One side has 4 little yappers, all mixed breeds, possible chihuahua's, shitsu's and possibly a jack russell terrier. Sasha can not stand these little guys, one in particular she chases the fence line back and forth, this has lasted almost 30 minutes at one point. Once she is in full pursuit, I can not call her off the fence line as she no longer listens to anything I say, I have to catch her by the collar and drag her inside. After reading many post I now know that she is in charge of the backyard... that being said what suggestions do you have? I have a tie down that is connected to the porch which she now has a 25 foot radius to run on, but will bark none stop if the neighbor dogs are outside. This barking problem has now landed us a code compliance warning from the city we live in... next time will be a $500 fine! Pleaes help any and all suggestions are much appreciated!
Try a tarp so the dogs cannot see each other. Out of sight, out of mind. So the other dogs have caused your dog to react, yet the neighbors do nothing to control their dogs, and the code enforcement issued YOU the warning?
 

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2 dogs and one mutt, you are advising in an 8 year old thread to someone who has not been back to this forum in 8 years.
 

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2 dogs and one mutt, you are advising in an 8 year old thread to someone who has not been back to this forum in 8 years.
Apparently, all your threads are out of date, and the issues faced by the authors of the questions are no longer timely, and behavior issues similar to those in question are also no longer relevant? Could it be that any response offered after a certain period of time has expired, is not considered relevant because the age of the question may be the reason for so many out of date threads?
 

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Try a tarp so the dogs cannot see each other. Out of sight, out of mind. So the other dogs have caused your dog to react, yet the neighbors do nothing to control their dogs, and the code enforcement issued YOU the warning?
Disregard the preceding reply because it is no longer relevant due to the fact that the question was published eight years ago, and no longer has merit because the problem of reactive dogs sharing a fence line has resolved and is no longer an issue for anyone....
 
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