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I recently let my best friend and his 8 year old pitbull daisy move in with me and my black lab. My roommate and i both work long hours during the day. We let daisy out in the mornings before going work and make sure that she pees and poops. We let her have free range in the house while we are gone while my lab is shut in my bedroom. My lab is fine and has no problems, but daisy will occasionally pee on the sofas her dog bed, the floor, etc. We put chairs on the sofas now so she can't get on them. We take away her bed and she finds something else to pee on. My roommate will scold her and she will pee right where she is. When I have the day off, she is just fine and doesn't ask to go out until it is the normal time that I would be getting home. I don't know what to do but this is starting to affect our friendship and I don't know what to do. He talks about getting rid of her but I don't think that is the answer. How do I get her to stop peeing on things when we are gone?
 

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Crate her, or if you have a nice fenced back yard build a proper chain spot for her out back. With a shelter, access to water, a 16-20' long chain with swivel on the end secured to a post cemented into the ground or the base of a large tree.

Note that any grass in the chain spot diameter will no longer exist.
 

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I think it's interesting that she can hold it all day while you're home, but will pee inside if you're out. To me, that rules out any medical issues and makes it seem strictly behavioural. My guess would be separation anxiety.

I agree that crating/chaining are the best options, but I would also do some training as well. Practice both you and your roommate leaving for short amounts of time, pretending to leave, etc., all the normal methods to fix separation anxiety. If you're positive that she doesn't have separation anxiety, then a vet trip wouldn't hurt just to have a urine sample/blood test run.

Is it possible for one of you to let her out during the day while on a lunch break or something? Do you currently leave any safe, stimulating toys or anything to keep her busy?
 

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Ruling it out by process of elimination doesn't retract from the factor that it is typical in geriatric dogs for behavioral changes to be linked to medical problems. They should always be monitored during senior years to be sure. Also another dog and new environment on a senior dog can cause serious issues. That can initially be misdiagnosed as SA. Is she spay?? If not could be marking it still can be with a spayed female but more typical with non spayed female.

Crating will help as has been said but, don't rule out other suggestions as far as the possible source of the rudimentary problem.

More information

Behavior Changes & Problems in Older (Senior, Geriatric) Dogs
 

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I agree vet visit in order. And a crate.
 

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I think it's interesting that she can hold it all day while you're home, but will pee inside if you're out. To me, that rules out any medical issues and makes it seem strictly behavioural. My guess would be separation anxiety.

I agree that crating/chaining are the best options, but I would also do some training as well. Practice both you and your roommate leaving for short amounts of time, pretending to leave, etc., all the normal methods to fix separation anxiety. If you're positive that she doesn't have separation anxiety, then a vet trip wouldn't hurt just to have a urine sample/blood test run.

Is it possible for one of you to let her out during the day while on a lunch break or something? Do you currently leave any safe, stimulating toys or anything to keep her busy?
I agree on this: separation anxiety. though I am certainly NOT in favor of crating. I believe that there is no need for a crate if you have a properly trained dog.

There are too many elements changing for her and not enough time for her to adjust. the moving, the lab and the fact that, from what you state, they do not interact constantly.

I am certainly not an expert on pitbulls, but I do know separation anxiety. Most likely the problem begins when you and your friend come home: over happiness on your friend will only help her believe that it has been longer than what it already has.

My suggestions:

* Do what BC dogs say: Start small and slowly increase the time away
* make sure that both dogs interact and interact peacefully. Being alone and secluded (with the lab tuck away elsewhere) feels more like punishment.
* when you guys return home, take the time to BE with her, before checking emails, opening the fridge for a beer and such. A small walkies or a fling of the ball will do wonders.
* teach her to read the clock (yes, don't laugh. I taught both my rottie and my nova scotia to read the clock, so when I said 15 minutes, they KNEW what 15 minutes meant)

A bit of work a bit more patience and a bit more time will make wonders when reducing and getting rid of separation anxiety.
 

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Practice making coming and going as non-eventful as possible. Keep your own energy calm and normal. Don't get excited when coming through the door, and insist on the dogs sitting and waiting to be released through the doorway, or the crate. If your energy isn't high, the dog has a better chance at being relaxed.
 
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