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I was wondering what are some guidelines when picking from a a litter? I know yall are gonna get on me, but please just try and work with me and educate me to the best of your knowledge. As yall know I have bred my bitch and one day I would like to start my own line and become active in shows. Grant it I have some great dogs in my bitches pedigree, but I know I have already started off the hard way by not starting off with the best of quality. But say one is just starting off and once the pups get here they could only have one of the pups how do you go about picking the pup? besides looking at how much you like the coat, build, etc. And I know most will say "It takes time. Your going to have to raise litters and examine their temperaments, drive, work ethic, faults, etc. In the nest few years I will have property and have an actual kennel, But besides certain looks what do you look for in a "pup"? I know its highly impossible, but what would you look for? Do you go with the more dominate one, or more of the middle of the road type when observing a litter? I can not stress enough that I know the mindsets here and the feedback I will get, but please understand this is the 1st baby steps of many I will be taking on a long road to what I hope will be success one day. Until I start going to shows and socializing with breeders and more knowledgeable dog-men the web is my only source for learning more, besides the books I have which do not have the answers to my questions. I know Im going backwards and should have done a lot of things different, but for me this is my starting point and everyone started somewhere.
 

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Your post is very confusing...Are you asking what puppy you should choose from your bitch's litter? Did you already breed your bitch or are you thinking about breeding your bitch?
 

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Your post is very confusing...Are you asking what puppy you should choose from your bitch's litter? Did you already breed your bitch or are you thinking about breeding your bitch?
Yes what pup I should pick from my bitch. And yes she is already bred. If she is actually pregnant I dunno yet, but I am taking her to vet in a few weeks to confirm and make sure everything is ok then again to see how many pups to expect
 

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I pick by how the puppy looks and acts. Not looks as in coat type, etc, etc. I look for a confident puppy that stands out above the rest. I take one or two at a time. Have a helper take them a bit away and call them to me. I can't really describe exactly what makes me pick a specific puppy. Movement, attitude? I just see the pup and know. That one is the one. It's the pick of the litter. I have never had a litter so I don't know if that will work if I bred them myself because I might be more kennel blind then. lol.

Which puppy you pick depends on what you are looking for/why you bred the litter. What were you hoping for? A show prospect? A working dog? Another pet? Or something else? That determines what temperament you should pick from the litter.
 

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OCD Bullyologist
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Well, you are working backwards in my opinion. You should have started showing her as a puppy and gotten at least one conformation ribbon, just so you know that you have a dog that is conform to standard before you bred her. I'm curious as to how old your dog is?

As for picking out a pup, color should have nothing to do with it. If you are serious about starting your own line, which is very hard I might add, you need look for the pup that most adequately fits your breeding plan. You do have a plan/goal correct?? Even at a young age you will be able to tell what pups are conform and which pups could have potential faults/problems. I suggest you read up on conformation so you know what to look for when the time comes.

Good luck!
 

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OCD Bullyologist
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I pick by how the puppy looks and acts. Not looks as in coat type, etc, etc. I look for a confident puppy that stands out above the rest. I take one or two at a time. Have a helper take them a bit away and call them to me. I can't really describe exactly what makes me pick a specific puppy. Movement, attitude? I just see the pup and know. That one is the one. It's the pick of the litter. I have never had a litter so I don't know if that will work if I bred them myself because I might be more kennel blind then. lol.

Which puppy you pick depends on what you are looking for/why you bred the litter. What were you hoping for? A show prospect? A working dog? Another pet? Or something else? That determines what temperament you should pick from the litter.
I forgot to add the temperament/personality aspect in my post. Good post, Aimee!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks yall. She is right at a yr. and a half old. Well I am thinking as using one as a foundation sire, or dam. I dunno which yet obviously. I want I guess what yall call a show and go? A damn good worker that is just as sexy. But me and my brother have been discussing this for a while. I may not keep any of them and find a liter from titled parents. It just so hard to find anything that's not bullys anymore, but the more I read and the more I talk with ppl Im learning most good breeders are pretty private and can even be hard to get pups. Even so they usually keep the best to themselves. Yes it would prob. have been easier and more flattering to have gotten a pup from proven parents, but I do believe either way I go if I dedicate myself to this like I know I can, I will be successful whether the parents are titled, or not.
 

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I think we already talked to him about breeding in 2 different threads and tried to educate but I guess he went ahead and bred her .

I picked cali from 3 litters and although you look at there build and stance and her markings helped the pick it wasnt the main reason . I actually had a brindle feamle as an option { Im not big on brindle} but the attitude is what caught me there was about 3 pups that were in the corner shy and not into attention so I crossed those out immediately. while looking at the 2 pups i had narrowed down cali got up on a big log and tried to get in our faces and started howling at us lol just kinda knew she was the one . Im sure givin 8 weeks to spend with the pups you will be able to see the differetn traits of each pup and make your decision just fine.
 

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Pits Are For Chicks
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Picking a puppy depends on what you are looking for in a dog. The best puppy out of a litter to one person is not the best puppy to another.

As for a foundation you will not know what is going to be foundation quality till they are much much older. You check for foundation from dogs not foundation puppies.

Having an untitled litter is not a big deal IMO IF you had purpose in your breeding. If your possibly not keeping any and getting a puppy from else where, what was the point in breeding?

I bred and un titled litter. I know my lines front to back and knew exactly what I was producing for ( a UKC show styled dog). I established by 16 weeks old that 4 out of 6 where not up to my standard and they where altered. I placed one nice intact female and kept one.. I now own both females again who are now 2yrs old and will compete to see who is a better dog as far as temperament, conformation and working ability. Then I will decide if either are worth breeding.

I planned on keeping 2-3 puppies from that litter, but with pet quality they where homed and my female that was placed at first was to a friend otherwise I would have been kept her begin with. I have all the dogs close and keep in constant contact to see how this litter matures. Even the pet quality puppies outcome as dogs will factor into whether either female is worth breeding.

Breeding and picking is not about just choosing the best puppy but knowing about the line is as whole, where you are going with it, and knowing what to look for for YOUR specific program.

EDIT: I would like to add that I did this breeding 2 years ago.Before I had the education to respect health testing and use it as a tool. Further litters from me will be titled and health tested on both sides. When you have the education there is not reason to not use it and better what you are breeding if you insist on going that direction.
 

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IMO you can't truly evaluate a pup until the pup is closer to a year old this is why when you breed you should be holding onto everything you breed so that you can keep what is going to benefit your stock/yard foundation later down the line. Pups change as they get older and you can't truly evaluate a dogs temperament until they are at least 2-3 years old. If it were my litter I wouldn't be so quick to pick anything and send the other's out the door. I would keep them all take them to some conformation shows and see how they do. The older they get the more they mature you will get a better idea of each pups personality. There really is no secret sauce to picking a pup other than waiting it out knowing what your looking for in a pup and being able to spot it out in your pups as they mature. You also can't cull properly if your not taking the time to evaluate what your breeding. Time is a big factor in all of this I can't tell you enough how much pups change from month to month.
 

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sadie gave good advice when she said to keep them all. most people when trying to start a line as you say you are will keep all the pups from a litter and raise them all so they can all be evaluated. at the very least i would only rehome a few pups to people that i know and would keep in contact with so that you could track the pups progress that way. now, as far as picking a puppy, to each his own. "one mans trash is another mans treasure". ive seen some real bulldogs that would be laughed at if they were entered into a conformation show but i would have loved to own one myself.
 

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[email protected] one man's trash is another man's treasure .. This is true though REAL bulldogs don't have to be pretty on the chain or at a conformation show as long as they are beautiful in the box:)
 

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If you're interested in evaluating a litter for performance work (agility, protection sports, tracking) here's a good test to use The Malinut Page PAWS Working Dog Evaluation |\.-./|

I also like the Volhard test for testing litters to find out the general behavior and personality of pups (this will change as they grow, but for the most part it will give you a general idea of what to expect).

I will be using both of these to get the exact pup I want in April, and I've used both on puppies AND adults in shelters to find suitable fosters for me to take on. (I only take on certain types of dogs in order to have a peaceful, coexisting household.)
 

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IMO i go for the little quiet one in the corner, there always the crazy mofos :D
 

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I go for the one that is a first of combinations.. The first pup to get out; the first pup to greet me everytime; the first pup to stomp the bully of the litter! dont care about looks much just whats upstairs.. Thats what worked for me...
 

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lol bogart was stomping on all his litter mates @ 5 weeks old. He had to go in another pen. Little monster. I like them bully pups as long as they are remaining the dominate one out the litter LOL. Bogart says respect my authority LFMAO!
 

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It depends on what your looking for in the dog. Are you looking for a working dog a show dog or a pet? Each one of those will have a different answer.

In my last litter the first dog to leave the box and be the most outgoing was not my pick bitch for a working dog. i thought for sure Xena would be my pick bitch for working ability since she seemed the most confident and the first to do everything. Crixus ended up show more promise as they got older for a working dog. Structure was the next thing I looked at and Earl (spartacus) was the pick of the litter fir conformation and he ended up going to a pet home but is showing great progress as a working dog too. Top working male was the male I kept, Varro, he will take some time to grow into himself and is just a tab long in the back for conformation. My point is every dog is different and it depends on what your looking for on which dog you pick. To picking conformation dog I think you need a good eye and experience to tell what your looking at. Working dogs you have to know what to look for just because the dog looks like the most confident maybe he lacks in prey or play drive and would not be the best. For a pet it depends on what home they are going to. I would not place a high drive pup no matter how nice they were to someone who wanted a couch and house dog. I would also not place a low drive dog to someone who wants a jogging partner.

The big things to look for and cull if you need to is fear and fear aggression.

It is important to place the dogs in the right home and not just sell them to the first person with money. I also think a good breeder will ask what they are looking for and pick the dog for the buyer based on personality not what the owner wants in looks.

Even when I think I made the best match possible I have gotten 3 dogs back over the years from owner who could not handle that high drive of a bulldog. They said they were ready but they did not understand what high drive really meant till they realized they got in over their heads.
 

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keep the ones you don't want and farm the ones "you"
think are the best. for some reason or another this
seems to be the best gamble, as puppy picking is
no kinda fun. just when you think you're right, they'll
prove you wrong and vise versa. as stated you must
have avenues to be able to keep in touch with ALL
you prospects in order to truly be one up on your
program. if this isn't your reality then leave the breeding
to the pro's,...for they've sat on litter after litter to hone
in on all the desirable traits and cull the undesirable ones.
it takes at least a decade to be in the conversation with
honorable dog breeders. life changes all the time and most events
are out of our control. unless you're stable in ALL aspects of life, i would
seriously consider some other outlet to play scientist. either reptiles,
rodents, or fish would be more gratifying and give you an overall knowledge
of what to expect if in fact one day you do decide to breed your own line
of bulldogs.
 
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