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Okay.

We have a 14 year-old female shepherd mix, who has never been into other dogs; she MUCH rather prefers human interaction, and by far the most submissive dog I have ever owned/come across.

We recently got Rambo an APBT.

Rambo is ten weeks on Monday and we've had him since a little over four weeks (I know, VERY soon for a pup, as he wasn't able to receive the proper socialization from the litter, but our backs were against the wall, so we took him then).
He's a rambunctious puppy-which is redundant, but it doesn't bode well with Jas.

He nips at her hind legs and follows her where ever she goes- if we allow it.
And sometimes he just wants to cuddle next to her. She wants no part of any of it.

Our hope was that if we stopped redirecting and correcting Rambo, that Jas would get fed up enough to use her heavy bark and correct him.

It has happened once in a month.

I'm not sure what to do because:

We want Rambo to be socialized with other dogs, but I don't want him associate that what he can't do with Jas means that he can't do with ANY dog (play, not the hind legs nipping).

We want to not correct the behavior and let Jas get to a point where she checks him- now while he's a puppy, as opposed to later (yes, he will be crated when we're not home), so she is her own defense, as opposed to turning to us.

It's frustrating seeing Jas behaving so submissively- she literally will stay upstairs in the bedroom all day in order to avoid him-not even coming down to eat or drink, and she in constantly in a state of high anxiety when he is out of the crate.

You guys, please give your input. I'm getting frustrated with the situation.

Thank you.
 

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Hello! This is my advice and what I would do if in that situation. I would correct the puppy since your older dog is not. Some dogs just won't do it and age can have something to do with it. I would be persistent in correcting him and rewarding him when he finally gets it. I would also reward him when he does anything positive around your other dog. For example, if the puppy enters the room and does not jump and attack her with play I would reward with a treat. I would also reward the puppy whenever he responds to your command to stop when he is playing rough or being annoying. I think redirecting is great but you also need to establish a better picture to the puppy that his behavior is not okay. Removing him and giving him a loud no is good and rewarding him when he does not go after her will begin to teach him that the behavior is unacceptable to you.
 

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From personal experience this worked for me. My male is dominant when he wants to be but when I adopted my female dog he seldomly corrected her when she would play with him when he didn't want to. He would simply walk away from her but she would keep going. At times he growled and pushed back. I began to do what I wrote above and she learned her limits. She never pushed his buttons enough for him to really put her in her place and at times he would look at me to correct her. The times he did correct her she would back off but her behavior continued. Now she rarely plays with him when she sees he is not feeling it. I learned what behaviors she would display before she got into this overly playful moods and I would correct her before she could even start. With time and patience she learned to stop when I correct her before she begins. She still plays with other dogs and with him but will correct herself when I tell her to stop. Both of my dogs know they are only allowed to play when I allow it.
 

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Kelevra
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Kelevra
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So how does your quip lend anything of substance?

And to think, you were the one whom I had considered messaging directly.
The quip... well.. it was meant as it was written..
We are talking about a seriously young, explorataory, hyper, teething ball of energy, introduced into a home with an elder dog, 14 years old, how long has the 14yr old had run of the house?
Its a comfortability thing, and a testing thing...

That ( or any ) pup is gonna put the old dog through the ringer.. run her ragged, and she isn't going to like it until the pup learns its place..

I apologize if I came off short, It has been a hectic day here at work..

Really there (IMHO) isn't a quick fix for this.. If they aren't always separate, the pup is gonna have the energy to push the old bitch's buttons all day long...
Good Luck
 

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I agree with correct/redirect. When the pup is getting too rambunctious, remove him and give a firm no, then redirect to something appropriate to take his energy out on. It will take a lot of time and consistency, especially considering your older dog isn't correcting him. He will get it eventually though, and once he's old enough to tire out with longer walks/more exercise, it'll get easier to handle.
 
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