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How does a dog body breaksdown protein and what is it used for???
 

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End-F0rum-Communism
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Dogs body breaks down protein just like any other mammal. Protein is made up of current 20 different types of amino acids. A dog/mammal can create 50% of those amino acids.

These amino acids are used for multiple things in a dog/mammale from transporting molecules to every single energy using cell in the body, hormones, anti-bodies, ect...

Protein is the fuel of body. If your dog is high in energy, and is a work dog. For instance, a dog thats very active would be any dog that has high cardio training just like humans. The more energy the body uses the more protein it needs.

When there's not enough protein the body begin to burn its own protein, but its only a limited supply, many instances, dogs begin to lose muscle just like body builders, because the body begins to consume muscle cells.

Too much protein and not enough exercise/movement, the body will convert the protein into fat, and store into fat deposits. Which will result in an obese human/dog/elephant/mammal.

Too much protein can cause kidney issues as well.
 

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End-F0rum-Communism
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I briefly explained it, but protein is broken down by protein synthesis. In which enzyme break down the protein molecules, break it down, and transcript it, and all that fun stuff that takes like 4 hours to explain.

end result would be a readable form of Polypeptides(usuable protein) that has different functions and instruction for the body.
 

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Explained well. :)

Just wanted to add one thing since most people I talk to ask this/get confused with it. In simpleton terms. Protein doesn't build muscle, it gives the body what it needs to maintain those muscles.
 

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OCD Bullyologist
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Dogs body breaks down protein just like any other mammal. Protein is made up of current 20 different types of amino acids. A dog/mammal can create 50% of those amino acids.

These amino acids are used for multiple things in a dog/mammale from transporting molecules to every single energy using cell in the body, hormones, anti-bodies, ect...

Protein is the fuel of body. If your dog is high in energy, and is a work dog. For instance, a dog thats very active would be any dog that has high cardio training just like humans. The more energy the body uses the more protein it needs.

When there's not enough protein the body begin to burn its own protein, but its only a limited supply, many instances, dogs begin to lose muscle just like body builders, because the body begins to consume muscle cells.

Too much protein and not enough exercise/movement, the body will convert the protein into fat, and store into fat deposits. Which will result in an obese human/dog/elephant/mammal.

Too much protein can cause kidney issues as well.
I've been researching the whole too much protein is bad theory, as I used to believe it myself; however, the research supporting that theory is pretty much bunk and holds no water, in my opinion. There is no conclusive evidence that dogs fed a high protein diet risk developing kidney issues. It is a myth that the dog food companies jumped on since protein is one of the most expensive things in dog food. First, the "study" was done on rats, whose diet is primarily grain so that makes the study null and void right there. I have yet to find solid proof that high protein causes kidney failure; however, I think that if you fed a dog food with primarily INCOMPLETE proteins then it could cause damage. Feeding low quality dog food with very low protein is more likely to cause coat issues, growth issues, etc because the dog's demand for required amino acids is not being met. I would rather feed a dog food that has a good quality animal/plant protein mix in it than some garbage animal protein that barely makes the cut for required nutrition sources.
 

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I've been researching the whole too much protein is bad theory, as I used to believe it myself; however, the research supporting that theory is pretty much bunk and holds no water, in my opinion. There is no conclusive evidence that dogs fed a high protein diet risk developing kidney issues. It is a myth that the dog food companies jumped on since protein is one of the most expensive things in dog food. First, the "study" was done on rats, whose diet is primarily grain so that makes the study null and void right there. I have yet to find solid proof that high protein causes kidney failure; however, I think that if you fed a dog food with primarily INCOMPLETE proteins then it could cause damage. Feeding low quality dog food with very low protein is more likely to cause coat issues, growth issues, etc because the dog's demand for required amino acids is not being met. I would rather feed a dog food that has a good quality animal/plant protein mix in it than some garbage animal protein that barely makes the cut for required nutrition sources.
:goodpost: I've been looking into it myself as well. I even got a hold of someone from Orijen and they made a study on Danes and saw NO side effects on kidneys or in excessive skeletal or ligament growth (another high protein myth)
 

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im a bodybuilder and protein is key to building/maintaining muscle its used to repair muscle tissue witch is broken down threw hard exercise ect,

i give my dogs a couple of raw eggs in there food after hard play and twice in the week they get tins of oily fish too.chicken and raw mince beef.

our muscle are made out of protein if you dont eat it your body uses it for energy when this happens your in what is called a catabolic state this is the reason i/we eat every 2 or 3 hours to stop this from happening keeping everything anti catabolic;)

same for dogs it works:)
 

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im a bodybuilder and protein is key to building/maintaining muscle its used to repair muscle tissue witch is broken down threw hard exercise ect,

i give my dogs a couple of raw eggs in there food after hard play and twice in the week they get tins of oily fish too.chicken and raw mince beef.

our muscle are made out of protein if you dont eat it your body uses it for energy when this happens your in what is called a catabolic state this is the reason i/we eat every 2 or 3 hours to stop this from happening keeping everything anti catabolic;)

same for dogs it works:)
:goodpost: never thought about that for dogs.
 

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I've been researching the whole too much protein is bad theory, as I used to believe it myself; however, the research supporting that theory is pretty much bunk and holds no water, in my opinion. There is no conclusive evidence that dogs fed a high protein diet risk developing kidney issues. It is a myth that the dog food companies jumped on since protein is one of the most expensive things in dog food. First, the "study" was done on rats, whose diet is primarily grain so that makes the study null and void right there. I have yet to find solid proof that high protein causes kidney failure; however, I think that if you fed a dog food with primarily INCOMPLETE proteins then it could cause damage. Feeding low quality dog food with very low protein is more likely to cause coat issues, growth issues, etc because the dog's demand for required amino acids is not being met. I would rather feed a dog food that has a good quality animal/plant protein mix in it than some garbage animal protein that barely makes the cut for required nutrition sources.

Eating a quantity of protein that is more than 30 per cent of your total daily caloric intake is no good, according to protein expert Gail Butterfield, PhD, RD, director of Nutrition Studies at the Palo Alto Veterans' Administration Medical Center and nutrition lecturer at Stanford University. (medicinenet.com) Dr Butterfield explains Eating more protein and increasing total caloric intake while maintaining the same exercise level will build an equal amount of additional fat and muscle mass, according to a study published in 1992 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

One of the biggest problems with eating too much protein is that it can create kidney problems. Excessive intakes of protein causes a buildup of ketones which your kidneys then have to work hard to get rid of, often causing dehydration, in the least.

Cleveland Clinic's nutrition experts say that too much protein in your diet, which can be caused by low carb diets, can cause your body to go into a dangerous metabolic state called ketosis as your body burns fat instead of glucose for energy. During ketosis, the body forms substances known as ketones, which can cause organs to fail and result in gout, kidney stones, or kidney failure. Ketones can also dull a person's appetite, cause nausea and bad breath. Ketosis is prevented by eating at least 100 grams of carbohydrates a day. (3)
Too Much Protein Is No Good | NutritionResearchCenter.org

Save the Meat for the Weekend
The recent Western obsession with protein diets is turning out to have potentially fatal results, namely osteoporosis and kidney failure. During protein metabolism, your kidneys must excrete the excess components of protein, known as amino acids.

To complete this process, the kidneys neutralize the acids by binding them to calcium, which in turn, depletes your body's store of this essential mineral.

The rate in the U.S. of osteoporosis is strikingly higher than China, where almost everyone eats a lower protein vegetarian diet. Evidence has also been found that excess protein weakens the kidney function. But you don't have to give up meat entirely to attain longevity.

In studies of animals with chronic kidney failure, simply reducing their intake of protein extended their lifespan by up to 50 percent! Take this advice: limit your meat eating to only the weekends, and you will be taking a balanced and healthy approach to your diet.
What Meat Eaters Should Know

opposing argument is still debunk as well
Why Protein is Not Bad for Your Kidneys

Since Doctor Atkins popularized the Low Carb Way of Eating, detractors and critics have continuously proclaimed, "Yer gonna kill yer kidneys!". This has been a particularly thorny criticism to refute because of the biology involved, so most of us have had to counter by pointing out the fact that no patient or adherent who started with healthy kidney function has ever sustained kidney damage through a ketogenic diet . This statement is true enough, but not exactly conclusive.

Where did the idea come from in the first place? It came from the very real association between ketones in urine and kidney damage suffered by diabetics. When a diabetic is in the more severe stages of the disease, his blood sugar is grossly elevated, his metabolism is vastly compromised, large amounts of aceto-acetic acid are found in his urine, and sure enough, there is frequently severe or even fatal kidney damage. The reasonable mind associates the presence of ketones in the urine with kidney damage; and the reasonable mind is wrong. To understand why, we must (briefly) examine how the kidney does its job.

The kidney is a size-exclusion filter (just what it sounds like). A small filtering unit called a glomerulus (about 6 million of them per kidney) is fed a stream of blood. Small molecules such as glucose, salts, urea, and ketones, along with all sorts of other (small) waste products, are filtered out of the blood through small pores and drained off to the bladder. The issue is a good bit more complicated than I am presenting here, but the principal is real. Small stuff is filtered out through these pores, while larger molecules are retained in the blood stream. When all is normal, an excess of protein is not harmful in any way. Proteins are *big* molecules, and will not fit through the pores. When a person's blood glucose levels are grossly elevated, many bad things happen; one of which is the formation of gluco-protein complexes in the blood. Glucose has a slight positive molecular charge, and the pores are negatively charged, so glucose will fit though and flow through the pores in the glomerulus. If that glucose molecule is dragging a protein with it, the protein end of the complex gets stuck in the pore. Blood pressure behind the protein will quite frequently shove the protein through the pore, physically damaging the pore in the process. Multiply this scene by several million times, and severe kidney damage is the result.

What does this mean? The protein did the damage, right? Yes, but it would not have done that damage if it weren't stuck to the glucose molecule. And the gluco-protein complex would not have formed if blood glucose levels were normal or near normal. The conclusion then, is obvious. If you are concerned about your kidneys, monitor your blood glucose levels. Many stores sell blood glucose monitors at reasonable prices. It's a small price to pay for something which can tell you exactly what is happening in your body, and just maybe save your life. And no, you don't have to be diabetic to buy one.
not to mention the result of protein being clogged can lead to kidney stones, or over working the kidneys, which eventually leads to kidney failure.

Picture of what im talking about....


Excess protein in the kidney is called proteinuria. This is tested in the urine and can also be called albuminuria or urine albumin. Most proteins are too big to pass through the glomeruli, or the kidney filters. When these filters are damaged, the proteins show up in the urine. High levels of protein in the urine are usually an indication of kidney damage or disease.

Read more: What Does Excess Protein In The Kidney Mean? | LIVESTRONG.COM
Protein is a vital nutrient, essential to your health. In its purest form, protein consists of chains of amino acids. There are 22 amino acids that combine to form different proteins, and 8 of these must come from the foods we eat. Our body uses these amino acids to create muscles, blood, skin, hair, nails and internal organs. Proteins help replace and form new tissue, transports oxygen and nutrients in our blood and cells, regulates the balance of water and acids, and is needed to make antibodies.

However, too much of a good thing may not be so good for you. Many people are putting their health at risk by eating too much protein. Excessive protein consumption, particularly animal protein, can result in heart disease, stroke, osteoporosis, and kidney stones. As important as protein is for our body, there are many misconceptions about how much we really need in our diet, and the best way to obtain it.

How It Can Lead To Problems...

Medical evidence shows that the body loses an average of 1.75 milligrams of calcium in the urine for every 1 gram increase in animal protein ingested. Additionally, as calcium and other minerals are leached from our bones, they are deposited in the kidneys and can form into painful kidney stones. If a kidney stone becomes large enough to cause a blockage, it stops the flow of urine from the kidney and must be removed by surgery or other methods.
Bodybuilding.com - High-Protein Diets: Are You Losing More Than Weight?

Opposition calling it a myth
Does high protein cause kidney disease?
No. This myth probably started because, in the past, patients with kidney disease were commonly placed on low-protein (and thus low-nitrogen) diets. Today, we often put them on a diet that is not necessarily very low in protein, but instead contains protein that is more digestible (therefore producing fewer nitrogen by-products). These diet changes are made merely because damaged kidneys may not be able to handle the excess nitrogen efficiently(Nitrogen would come from the protein and still doesn't address excess protein). In pets with existing kidney problems, nitrogen can become too high in the bloodstream which can harm other tissues.

Unless your veterinarian has told you your pet has a kidney problem that is severe enough to adjust the protein intake, you can feed your pet a normal amount of protein without worrying about "damaging" or "stressing" your pet's kidneys. Also, keep in mind the fact that you are not "saving" your pet's kidneys by feeding a low-protein diet.
Dog Food FAQs: Protein
 

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:goodpost: I've been looking into it myself as well. I even got a hold of someone from Orijen and they made a study on Danes and saw NO side effects on kidneys or in excessive skeletal or ligament growth (another high protein myth)
Excess protein unbalances calcium in the body, and that is not a myth.

The great dane lady states in order to fix KNUCKLING, you have to feed a much lower protein diet. When the body is delivering calcium its also delivering protein. Which hinders the calcium benefits.

Knuckling over is first noticed in the area of front leg on a puppy, or the growth plate (wrist or carpal) area. The term coined by professional breeders for this condition is knuckling over, and it describes a condition where the front end assembly of the dog, the weight bearing part of the body, is unable to support the whole body weight of the puppy, due to a lack of integrity in the muscle, tendon and ligaments. It is my opinion this condition is not genetic - it is due to uneven growth pattern between the bone and tissue/muscle of the puppy and it is cause by dietary imbalances and/or missing micro-minerals and/or minerals that are not available to the body - difficult to assimilate.
Knuckling Over and HOD - Developmental Orthopedic Disease | GREATDANELADY.COM
 

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:goodpost: never thought about that for dogs.
yeah it becomes a must for people like us who like to work and run our dog hard to keep them looking good without the fuel inside them they would very thin like long distance runners ect.

for muscle building effects in humans when try to add mass we aim for 1 to 2 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight eg a 200lb male needs 200 to 300 grams of protein per day.

you could maintain by eating 200g a day forr extra size up it.

not sure on dogs on this one but it cant be much different a 70 pit needs 70 grams to 100 a day to muscle up??maybe
 

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Excess protein unbalances calcium in the body, and that is not a myth.

The great dane lady states in order to fix KNUCKLING, you have to feed a much lower protein diet. When the body is delivering calcium its also delivering protein. Which hinders the calcium benefits.

Knuckling Over and HOD - Developmental Orthopedic Disease | GREATDANELADY.COM
Yes, feeding a lower protein dog food is the best way to fix knuckling; however, most cases I have seen of dogs knuckling was because they were fed a really crappy food that already had very low protein. Knuckling while feeding a high protein diet is not from the high protein, but rather the excess weight on the dog's frame.

Research over the past 10 years or so has shown that protein does not harm the kidney of dogs. In studies conducted at the University of Georgia in the early 1990s, both in dogs with chronic kidney failure and in older dogs with only one kidney, protein levels as high as 34 percent caused no ill effects. David S. Kronfeld, Ph.D., indicated that "compared with high- or low-protein diets, moderate-protein diets (up to 34 % is moderate), did not cause any harm to dogs with chronic renal failure and were associated with general improvement."
 

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Heres another excerpt from the same article
Protein malnutrition can be as harmful as protein excess and can even lead to death in dogs with kidney disease [13]. Lastly, although moderate protein restriction may help with metabolic acidosis, this is not a common occurrence in dogs with kidney disease, particularly in the early and moderate stages, and is usually treated using alkalinizing agents such as sodium bicarbonate and potassium citrate, not by further protein reduction [14].
DogAware.com Kidney Disease: Is a Low-Protein Diet Desirable or Necessary?

This same article states
Nutrition and Renal Function from the Purina Research Report
"Dietary Protein and Renal Function: Results of multiple studies indicated that there were no adverse effects of the high protein diets." This report also includes information on metabolic acidosis and on the beneficial effects of omega-3 essential fatty acids in patients with chronic renal failure. The complete reports on each of the three studies mentioned in this report are available online, as follows: Effects of Dietary Lipids on Renal Function in Dogs and Cats; Effects of Dietary Protein Intake on Renal Functions; and Acid-Base, Electrolytes, and Renal Failure. (I have copies of these if they cannot be found online).
The article deals with dogs with Protein Restriction(19% and below) rather being fed a normal protein diet which would be from 20-35%. Which the article you got from is from.

Feeding the Older Dog from the SpeedyVet Clinical Nutrition Library
"The assumption was that low-protein diets retarded the progression of renal degeneration. This assumption was disproved, using partially nephrectomised dogs, which showed no uraemic signs and had reduced but stable renal function for 48 months. These dogs did better on moderate-protein diets than on low-protein diets. There is no direct evidence that high protein intake damages canine kidneys or that reducing protein intake in dogs with renal dysfunction results in preservation of either renal structure or function."
Articles on that site, is to prove low protein foods(walmart/grocery store foods) are bad, and that use shouldnt down grade if your dog has kidney/renal problems.. Doesnt deal with excess protein.

the quotes above come from the same article you got your info on.
 

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Study: Kidney Failure May Be 3 Times as Likely With Obesity
By Miranda Hitti
WebMD Health News Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD
May 22, 2006 -- New research shows that people who have ever been obese may be more likely to develop chronic kidney failure (chronic renal failure, or CRF).

"Obesity seems to be an important -- and potentially preventable -- risk factor for CRF," write Elisabeth Ejerblad, MD, and colleagues in June's Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Ejerblad works at Sweden's Karolinska Institute. Her study included 926 people with chronic kidney failure and 998 people of similar backgrounds without chronic kidney failure. Among the findings:

Being overweight at age 20 tripled the odds of chronic kidney failure.
Men who had ever been obese and women who had ever been very obese were 3 to 4 times as likely as those who had never been obese to have CRF.
http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20060519/obesity-may-up-risk-of-kidney-failure

Excess protein also leads to obesity, and obesity leads to kidney failure.
 

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It is not high protein itself that is an issue more so than the quality and how it is delivered. I have fed high protein diets for all my hounds over the years, out of 16 hounds i have fed and handled, 12 i actually have owned, i have never had an issue with knuckling, kidney malfunction or any other "myth" associated with high protein diets. By high protein, i am speaking of 34%+ with an average of 36% give or take a percentage.

Kibble diets are extremely questionable in modern days especially, just as human foods are as to what actually goes in the processing as well as the quality of which each ingredient holds. Meaning, most are now aware that pedigree, kibbles n bits, etc are garbage feeds for more than one reason. You also have to factor in the cost you buy each bag, cost of manufacturing, cost of advertisement, % that the company you buy from gets, profit %'s the company who manufactures gets, etc. Obviously if you are buying a feed for $15, 40lbs.. The quality is not going to be there.

Another thing you have to look at is what the hound needs.. A working hound is going to need higher fat %'s. higher protein %'s, etc than a lap dog that does no hard labor unless you consider walking down the block and back hard labor..

There is not enough sufficient evidence out there that directly associates high protein diets to kidney failure and other internal related problems. Now is there some interesting articles out there? Sure, however for every one there is that says its an issue theres another one that says its not. Experience, for me, speaks more so than any internet pulled article.

Just as i can pull "scientific fact" that APBT's have locking jaws, i can even pull articles that provide "evidence" for such with some BS video showing proof.. Or some other "scientific facts" that allow insight to chemicals in the brain of an APBT that makes them "lock on" during a bite.. Does this make it fact? No, they are bulldogs and simple as that.

Now granted, i am not suggesting that my examples and the ones based on protein are one of the same.. There is more truth to the protein argument however again, if it was an issue i'm quite certain i would have experienced to some level any of the issues brought up associated with such.

Also, as mentioned, genetics do have a larger impact than the feed so long as you are feeding quality feeds.. Meaning, raw OR high quality kibble. You also have to factor in that each individual dog will react differently to feeds... I've seen hounds that look great and are 100% healthy living longer than "breed average" on poor feeds, such as Iams. Does this mean Iams is a great feed? Absolutely not, however, it does stand to note that studies can easily be manipulated to go in either direction.

In cases i have personally seen over the years, the owners of said dog ignored signs FAR too long until it was too late in terms of what they were feeding and how the dog was reacting, this goes further than just the protein argument.
 
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