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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last night my 11 month old pit punctured an asthma inhaler and it filled his system with Albuterol and his heart rate soared from normal to about 140 bpm within 15 minutes, we called the vet and we were told to just keep him as calm and relaxed as possible. He kept the high heart rate through the night until late this morning.. finally his heart slowed down along with his breathing, but his eyes are still blood shot and just started watering non stop. Can anyone tell me why this is happening and if it will go away or if I should do something to help him out.
 

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. Uses/Indications - Albuterol is used principally in dogs and cats for its effects on bronchial smooth muscle to alleviate bronchospasm or cough. It potentially could also be used in horses as a bronchodilator.

Pharmacokinetics - The specific pharmacokinetics of this agent have apparently not been thoroughly studied in domestic animals. In general, albuterol is absorbed rapidly and well after oral administration. Effects occur within 5 minutes after oral inhalation, and 30 minutes after oral administration (e.g., tablets). It does not cross the blood-brain barrier, but does cross the placenta. Duration of effect generally persists for 3-6 hours after inhalation and up to 12 hours (depending on dosage form) after oral administration. The drug is extensively metabolized in the liver, prin*cipally to the inactive metabolite, albuterol 4'-O-sulfate. After oral administration, the serum half life in humans has been reported as 2.7-5 hours.

Contraindications/Precautions/Reproductive Safety - Albuterol is contraindicated in patients hypersensitive to it. One veterinary school formulary (Schultz 1986) states that a related drug (terbutaline), is contraindicated in dogs and cats with heart disease, particularly when CHF or cardiomyopathy is present. It should be used with caution in patients with diabetes, hyperthyroidism, hypertension, seizure disorders, or cardiac disease (especially with concurrent arrhythmias).

In very large doses, albuterol is teratogenic in rodents. It should be used (particularly the oral dosage forms) during pregnancy only when the potential benefits outweigh the risks. Like some other beta agonists, it may delay pre-term labor after oral administration. It is unknown whether the drug crosses into maternal milk.

Adverse Effects/Warnings - Most adverse effects are dose-related and are those that would be expected with sympathomimetic agents including increased heart rate, tremors, CNS excitement (nervousness) and dizziness. These effects are generally transient and mild and usually do not require discontinuation of therapy. Decreased serum potassium values may be noted; rarely is potassium supplementation required.

Overdosage/Acute Toxicity - Symptoms of significant overdose after systemic administration may include arrhythmias (bradycardia, tachycardia, heart block, extrasystoles), hypertension, fever, vomiting, mydriasis, and CNS stimulation. Hypokalemia may also be noted. If recently ingested (orally), and if the animal does not have significant cardiac or CNS effects, it should be handled like other overdoses (empty gut, give activated charcoal and a cathartic). If cardiac ar*rhythmias require treatment, a beta-blocking agent (e.g., propranolol) can be used, but may precipitate bronchoconstriction. The oral LD50 in rats is reported to be greater than 2 g/kg. Contact a poison control center for further information.

Drug Interactions - Use of albuterol with other sympathomimetic amines may increase the risk of developing adverse cardiovascular effects. Beta-adrenergic blocking agents (e.g., propranolol) may antagonize the actions of albuterol. Tricyclic antidepressants or monoamine oxidase inhibitors may potentiate the vascular effects of albuterol. Use with inhalation anesthetics (e.g., halothane, isoflurane, methoxyflurane), may predispose the patient to ventricular ar*rhythmias, particularly in patients with preexisting cardiac disease-use cautiously. Use with digitalis glycosides may increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias

I would have brought my dog in to have examined it sounds like overdose and anything that effects the heart rate should be very closely monitored. If you trust your vet enough to take advice over the phone then follow his guidelines if you dont know the vet well Id take him in to get checked out.

EDIT: my source incase you want to read more: http://www.elephantcare.org/Drugs/albute.htm
 

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I would go to the vet
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In all honesty, I didn't understand most of that. Is there long term affects from this? So far he is back to normal [other than his eyes are puffy and watering](externally anyway)! I'm guessing when it punctured he got scared and then curious of it and looked at it and it sprayed in his eyes. Or its from inhaling it and is an after effect from the high heart rate.. I don't know. If you can put that into words an average human can understand, that would be great.
Thanks for the advice everyone.
 

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In all honesty, I didn't understand most of that. Is there long term affects from this? So far he is back to normal [other than his eyes are puffy and watering](externally anyway)! I'm guessing when it punctured he got scared and then curious of it and looked at it and it sprayed in his eyes. Or its from inhaling it and is an after effect from the high heart rate.. I don't know. If you can put that into words an average human can understand, that would be great.
Thanks for the advice everyone.
I don't understand why you don't just take him to a vet, you are asking us for what could happen or long term effects.. We are not vets nor are we there to look at him and see what might be going on further more.. While i do believe there are some vet members on here you need to go get him examined to make sure nothing else is happening or hasn't caused issues internally.

I also have inhalers for allergy induced asthma (HFA, HC) and i wouldn't risk not getting one of my dogs looked at if they took any where near a full inhaler canister.. If you as a human would do that, it can cause sever pain, heart complications (not just including heart attack) and result in death. We are talking about a smaller animal inhaling that much.. Theres bound to be something going on.. If not you are VERY lucky but either way you need to go some where ASAP.
 
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Overdosage/Acute Toxicity - Symptoms of significant overdose after systemic administration may include arrhythmias (bradycardia, tachycardia, heart block, extrasystoles), hypertension, fever, vomiting, mydriasis, and CNS stimulation. Hypokalemia may also be noted. If recently ingested (orally), and if the animal does not have significant cardiac or CNS effects, it should be handled like other overdoses (empty gut, give activated charcoal and a cathartic). If cardiac ar*rhythmias require treatment, a beta-blocking agent (e.g., propranolol) can be used, but may precipitate bronchoconstriction. The oral LD50 in rats is reported to be greater than 2 g/kg. Contact a poison control center for further information

tachycardia is what your dog experienced and should have been under vet watch at that point and treated from overdose, that is from inhaling not from having it in his face. the eyes could be either could be a side effect from the over dose he went through or could be a reaction to having it in his eyes . it can cause irritation if in his eyes and would have been best if he had his eyes flushed with a saline solution after this happened. Although now its been awhile and the tears { watering} you are seeing is most likely flushing it out on its own now. If there is still watering you may want to help him out and flush his eyes. If it continues to water afterwards you may want to have a vet look at him and check his eyes out.Not sure if this drug can effect the eyes at all in a negative way. Like it says above if concerned you can contact a poison control center { something that should have been done when it happened} and see if they recommend anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everyone again.. we are taking him to the vet but its the weekend and we can't afford to take him into the emergency vet. When we called the vet they said they couldn't do anything so we didn't take him. ( if it were to happen again I would take him in immediately). I understand now, the risks, the problems, side effects and all. I asked on here because many of you know way more than I do on what it could be. I'm not trying to sound mean or anything.. I just freak out about our "baby"and want some answers some how before we go in and I got them, I just couldn't understand the answers. I appreciate all you help. [ his eyes are back to normal, and everything else that I noticed before is back to normal]
 

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no Problem Id be freaked too especially with the heart rate going crazy. Usually if the eyes are watering use a saline solution or water and just flushthem its usually a sign of irritation, if there is a icky discharge or colored discharde it could be a eye infection and would need to be looked at. If you ever wonder about certain drugs you can always call poison control or sometimes even the pharmacist they should be able to tell you if its something harmful to there eyes or system and can give you guidlines on what you can do. { good for those who dont have a vet avail at odd hours of the night or weekends}
 

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I don't understand why you don't just take him to a vet, you are asking us for what could happen or long term effects.. We are not vets nor are we there to look at him and see what might be going on further more.. While i do believe there are some vet members on here you need to go get him examined to make sure nothing else is happening or hasn't caused issues internally.

I also have inhalers for allergy induced asthma (HFA, HC) and i wouldn't risk not getting one of my dogs looked at if they took any where near a full inhaler canister.. If you as a human would do that, it can cause sever pain, heart complications (not just including heart attack) and result in death. We are talking about a smaller animal inhaling that much.. Theres bound to be something going on.. If not you are VERY lucky but either way you need to go some where ASAP.
:goodpost:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
no Problem Id be freaked too especially with the heart rate going crazy. Usually if the eyes are watering use a saline solution or water and just flushthem its usually a sign of irritation, if there is a icky discharge or colored discharde it could be a eye infection and would need to be looked at. If you ever wonder about certain drugs you can always call poison control or sometimes even the pharmacist they should be able to tell you if its something harmful to there eyes or system and can give you guidlines on what you can do. { good for those who dont have a vet avail at odd hours of the night or weekends}
Thank you. I am going to call now.
 
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