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Scared owners dump danger dogs.
Exclusive By James Connell

Boxers, bull terriers and rottweilers are thrown out after the death of a young girl

PANICKING owners are dumping dogs following the death of Ellie Lawrenson, who was savaged by her uncle's pit bull terrier on New Year's Day.

Worcestershire has seen an increase in abandoned dogs from certain breeds since five-year-old Ellie was mauled in her grandmother' s home in St Helens, Merseyside.

County dog kennels say people are panicking in the wake of the attack and dumping breeds such as Staffordshire bull terriers because they are mistaking them for banned breeds such as pit bulls.

Pit bulls, Japanese tosas, dogo Argentinos and fila Brazilieros are the only dogs banned under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, although animals from other breeds can be destroyed if they display aggressive behaviour.

Pip Singleton, a dog warden with Wychavon District Council, has reported a rise in the number of stray rottweilers, German shepherds, Staffordshire bull terriers, Staffordshire cross-breeds and boxer crosses. The Danemere kennels in Tibberton has places for 10 dogs but now houses 15 strays - 80 per cent higher than usual.
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Ms Singleton said: "We think people are dumping dogs because they are panicking.

"Our message is that there is no need to panic. All of these dogs have a lovely nature. We understand what happened in Merseyside was terrible but it was isolated.

"Be responsible for the dog you own, do the right thing by the dog and you're doing the right thing by society and by children. It's how they are handled, looked after and socialised that is important.

"People are jumping on the bandwagon and thinking Oh my God' and they are just chucking out their dogs. We have had people phoning us up saying we have a Staffordshire bull terrier - is that a type of pit bull?' There is ignorance about what type of dog is and is not allowed in the country."

Worcester City Council also recorded a higher than average number of Staffordshire bull terriers abandoned - 11 dogs of the 43 found roaming the streets between September and January. January figures are still being collated.

However, Martin Gillies, environmental health manager at the council, said the overall number of strays had fallen from 215 in 2003 to around 70 dogs last year.

Dog owners in Worcester are forced to pay statutory fines, kennel costs and administration fees to have their dogs returned.

Meanwhile, Eve Bowen, relief manger at Worcestershire Animal Rescue Centre, Deblins Green, near Malvern has also reported a rise in the number of Staffordshire bull terriers - six or seven are now waiting to be rehomed and people are not wanting to take them anymore.

A spokesman for the Dogs Trust rehoming centre in Wickhamford, Evesham, said they also had a lot of Staffordshire bull terriers and German shepherds at the moment.

Posted by: Marjorie on 6:13pm Fri 12 Jan 07
The efficacy of the DDA: BBC reports a 25% INCREASE in hospitalizations due to dog bites AFTER DDA enacted. Over a decade later, and just as every expert predicted, people who already didn't obey the law weren't magically doing to start obeying new laws, either. As proof, banned 'breeds' still roam the streets, and the Queen suffered a nasty bite from one of her Corgi's. Well, two nasty bites, actually, since the DDA was enacted. (sarcastic) When will Britain wake up and restrict Corgis, like Italy did, along with over 90 different kinds of dogs? (morons) Several Collies have been deemed dangerous, after several bites, in the last year. Same with Shepherds, and Spaniels, and Hounds. A farmer was seriously attacked by some lurchers, last year. No single 'breed' or type of dog is responsible for the majority of bites, attacks, or fatalities. In most areas, at least 90% of reported bites are attributed to Labs, Collies, Cocker Spaniels, Shepherds, and other popular family pets. There is no such thing as a "dangerous breed", so that phrase has become a litmus test for determining someone's expertise on this issue. If they use the term "dangerous breed", they don't know what the heck they're talking about, and should be dismissed. 99.9% of all dogs, from all breeds, will never be involved in an attack at any time in their lives; proving virtually all dogs, no matter what their breed, aren't a danger to anyone. If less than 0.1% of any breed attacks, it certainly says nothing about virtually all the rest who don't. Five gallon buckets and marbles are more dangerous than dogs. More people die tripping over their own slippers, than from a dog bite. 100 times as many people die slipping in their own bathtubs, as are killed by dogs. Wake up! Hysteria and ignorance are unattractive. "The public" isn't involved in the majority of dog bite, attack, and fatality cases. Over 99% of bites take place on, or directly adjacent to, private property. Most people are bitten, attacked, or killed by a dog they know. Most often, it is their own dog. "The public" is not in significant danger of being bitten by dogs they don't know, and is in virtually no danger from dogs being properly supervised by their owners in a neutral public place. (For all of you who live by exceptions, yes, it occasionally happens. But the numbers pale in comparison to the more than 99% of bites that don't involve supervised dogs in public places, or a dog known to the victim, or the victim's own dog.) The cities with the very best records on reducing dog bites do not have breed bans in place. They target the appropriate end of the leash: the negligent human owner who'd raise both a Poodle and a Rottweiler to be a danger, just like the Yorkshire Terrier, Pomeranian, Lhasa Apso, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds that have all killed people.

The efficacy of the Dangerous Dog Act (DDA):

BBC reports a 25% INCREASE in hospitalizations due to dog bites AFTER DDA enacted.

Over a decade later, and just as every expert predicted, people who already didn't obey the law weren't magically doing to start obeying new laws, either. As proof, banned 'breeds' still roam the streets, and the Queen suffered a nasty bite from one of her Corgi's. Well, two nasty bites, actually, since the DDA was enacted.

(sarcastic) When will Britain wake up and restrict Corgis, like Italy did, along with over 90 different kinds of dogs? (morons)

Several Collies have been deemed dangerous, after several bites, in the last year. Same with Shepherds, and Spaniels, and Hounds. A farmer was seriously attacked by some lurchers, last year.

No single 'breed' or type of dog is responsible for the majority of bites, attacks, or fatalities. In most areas, at least 90% of reported bites are attributed to Labs, Collies, Cocker Spaniels, Shepherds, and other popular family pets.

There is no such thing as a "dangerous breed", so that phrase has become a litmus test for determining someone's expertise on this issue. If they use the term "dangerous breed", they don't know what the heck they're talking about, and should be dismissed. 99.9% of all dogs, from all breeds, will never be involved in an attack at any time in their lives; proving virtually all dogs, no matter what their breed, aren't a danger to anyone. If less than 0.1% of any breed attacks, it certainly says nothing about virtually all the rest who don't.

Five gallon buckets and marbles are more dangerous than dogs. More people die tripping over their own slippers, than from a dog bite. 100 times as many people die slipping in their own bathtubs, as are killed by dogs.

Wake up! Hysteria and ignorance are unattractive.

"The public" isn't involved in the majority of dog bite, attack, and fatality cases. Over 99% of bites take place on, or directly adjacent to, private property. Most people are bitten, attacked, or killed by a dog they know. Most often, it is their own dog. "The public" is not in significant danger of being bitten by dogs they don't know, and is in virtually no danger from dogs being properly supervised by their owners in a neutral public place. (For all of you who live by exceptions, yes, it occasionally happens. But the numbers pale in comparison to the more than 99% of bites that don't involve supervised dogs in public places, or a dog known to the victim, or the victim's own dog.)

The cities with the very best records on reducing dog bites do not have breed bans in place. They target the appropriate end of the leash: the negligent human owner who'd raise both a Poodle and a Rottweiler to be a danger, just like the Yorkshire Terrier, Pomeranian, Lhasa Apso, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds that have all killed people.

http://www.worcesternews.co.uk/display.var.1119477.0.scared_owners_dump_danger_dogs.php

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