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GP's Dr. Phil
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Thinking of getting a dog? Dogs are phenomenal creatures. They can serve a multitude of purposes ranging from companions, service dog, working dog, sporting dogs, etc. Some breeds excel at things that others don't and choosing a dog should be based upon you and your needs as the owner. What this means is that there are more factors that should be taken into account when it comes to choosing a dog other than its looks. What type of person are you? Are you active? Competitive? Strong? Submissive? In addition, what type of environment will the dog live in (living space, family structure, city, rural, etc?)

Many of us choose dogs for the wrong reasons and quickly learn that the dog isn't what we had in mind. This can lead to a multitude of things, ranging from neglect, incorrect training, adoption, dog accidents, etc. In order to make the right decision, you should actively research the breed (history, temperament, size, health) and find owners who you can interact with. Without knowing what you are getting, there is no way to know where you will end. Knowledge is key. Preventative measures are easier than costly mistakes. Pick the dog the best suits you and your needs, whether it is a cuddle bug, a guard dog, or a sports dog. There aren't any bad dogs. There are only bad owners. Sure, sometimes things can go wrong or you have a crappy specimen of the breed, that should be culled, but if you truly know what you need, less chance of something not going as planned. Amongst all things, know what the dog was bred for. If it was bred to be a couch potato, don't expect it to work. If it was bred to be a guard dog, don't get mad if it bites or guards and since this is a "pit bull" site expect "pit" bull behavior; fights are expected... It isn't the end of the world (unless you lose the dog.) *Coming to terms with your wants, needs, and characteristics, combined with the knowledge of the breed you seek, will make you a better dog owner who is prepared to handle what comes his/her way.

One of the most important (if not the most important) factors in a dogs disposition, is its history. Every dog has its place in the correct environment (hence - no bad dogs. Just bad owner.) Knowing why your breed of choice was created will help you start to dial in on a choice of breed. Fail to recognize the breed's purpose may result in a devastating disaster that you may not be prepared to handle. You may not agree with some more experienced owners, handlers, breeders, or even the dogs past. That's ok. Rather than be ignorant and think that it wont happen to you or that *you can wipe away xyz years of breeding for a purpose away, thinking that the original purpose was inhumane or sheer stupidity, remain open minded at all times. As was mentioned, you don't have to like or agree with something but total disregard is plain old stupid.

Here are some comparisons to help you get a general idea of some differences.

Show Mali



Working Mali



Show GSD



Working GSD



APBT



Amstaff



American bully



Show husky



Working husky



Show gsd's working lol


While some of these dogs may share a name, or look ( to a degree,) they are vastly different.
Every breed has its origin for a specific purpose. Choose wisely.
 

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GP's Dr. Phil
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks FH :)
 

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K9 Pshrynk & Conciliare~
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Most people dont realize that Huskies are simply working wolfdogs of this flavor and strain or of that and they aren't bred for looks... Yep there are some pretty ones, but like bulldogs that are bred for work, its the prettiest of the workers you wanna show off.. Mind you most of the iditarod runners are NOT picture pretty dogs to most.

I dont think most people realize that when getting an Alastian Wolfdog, GSD, or Mali that the REAL working dogs come with a certificate of breed and that' it NO Peidgree, and they're the best dang work horse for an all around utility dog.
Rottweillers for example, again far cry difference between american pedigreed dogs and the German Imported working dog.

What we really don't take into consideration is most working dogs are named for their function or area of origin as a working dog.. When people look for dogs and they simply want a pet to play fetch with and nothing more, maybe the Non-sporting group of dogs is more appropriate but usually pride and ego push a person to get a dog they are not prepared for and have no intention of wanting the accountability.
 

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GP's Dr. Phil
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What we really don't take into consideration is most working dogs are named for their function or area of origin as a working dog.. When people look for dogs and they simply want a pet to play fetch with and nothing more, maybe the Non-sporting group of dogs is more appropriate but usually pride and ego push a person to get a dog they are not prepared for and have no intention of wanting the accountability.
Exactly what I wanted to touch on. Know what you want, your intentions, and the type of person you are and see what dog suits best. This way you set the dog and yourself up for the best.
 
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it amazes me how much people are able to change a breed for purpose. I know that's part of the lure of being a breeder I imagine, but some dogs are just really hurt by the show breed (GSD, is what I am referring to most.) Great post, it is really important to think about, especially if you have something specific in mind, its not just about how much time and effort you put into a dog, its also years of their own history.
 

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One of my all time favorite comparisons I have seen is the Dachshound those dogs have undergone some crazy BS when it comes to historical and modern show bred stock.

A very good post btw OP, some people do NOT know what they are getting into when they buy a dog and are often very let down or ill prepared.
 

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GP's Dr. Phil
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
it amazes me how much people are able to change a breed for purpose. I know that's part of the lure of being a breeder I imagine, but some dogs are just really hurt by the show breed (GSD, is what I am referring to most.) Great post, it is really important to think about, especially if you have something specific in mind, its not just about how much time and effort you put into a dog, its also years of their own history.
I agree ! Its bananas at times.

One of my all time favorite comparisons I have seen is the Dachshund those dogs have undergone some crazy BS when it comes to historical and modern show bred stock.

A very good post btw OP, some people do NOT know what they are getting into when they buy a dog and are often very let down or ill prepared.
:goodpost:
 
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I was checking out a working GSD breeder and got to see their dogs preform. Another club was there with their showbred GSDs, the only dog that was decent out of the group was nothing compared to the working bred GSDs. And some dogs just don't do well with the harsher training, it was written all over the show dogs, they were very uneasy fearful of their handlers (like that dog at 6:05 in the video). It was an accident waiting to happen.

I hate how people get GSDs and go into the "OMG WE MUST DO SCHUTZHUND!" mind set. -_- I've seen a lot of dogs that could be nice pet dogs be ruined by idiotic owners and their do it at home Schutzhund jobs.

Sorry to rant, I adore working bred GSDs. I find that they're quite under appreciated in a lot of places.
 

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Really good read, Freddie, and some good comparisons too.
 

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Nice job OP and oh so true. When I looked for my first dog. It was important to me to know the temperment and what would be a good fit for my lifestyle and living conditions. What my availablitiy to train and how many hours I would have to care for the dog.
 

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GP's Dr. Phil
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nice job OP and oh so true. When I looked for my first dog. It was important to me to know the temperment and what would be a good fit for my lifestyle and living conditions. What my availablitiy to train and how many hours I would have to care for the dog.
That's good. I bet your dog is well cared for.
 

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Yes thanKs for the info. It is a real eye- opener. And I have to sheepishly admit that I was one of those who first got a pup for looks. I went through a LOT of learning, running around after my escape artist husky. Won't make that mistake again!!!

Research, research, research!
 

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^^^^ this guy is soon becoming my favorite new member hahahaha


the apbt history does have bull baiting, pit fighting, working /pulling for mining etc etc.... we accept that animal cruelty although part of human history is something that we have to improve and never repeat.... so an APBT is a working dog now because we all understand the other parts of its history are just that....history.


hope this answer helps your sarcastic question
 

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I love the OP. And that's A shame.
I remember the day when folks either got A dog because they knew what they wanted.or they got it and adapted to it by trial and error. Trial being the key word.
Folks get dogs based on looks, popularity, celebrity influence,(chi hu hu's are lousy all around pets) the list is long.
Sadly the list of suffering and overbred dogs is as long.
 

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Please do plenty of research before selecting a dog or breed!

Hello - This is my first time posting here & I am going through a difficult time after losing 3 pit mixes that I cared for since birth (for 5 yrs). I won't give a "blow by blow" but basically the tragic situation happened because I was not fully aware/educated/informed that pits or pit mixes can "lose it" in a matter of seconds - as the result of feeling threatened, jealous (over their owner) or because of "the alpha male" thing. For 5 years I kept 3 pit mixes outside (under shelter) - one male & one female together & then a single male separately due to previous fight issues. The female NOT ONCE got into it with either male over the 5 year period. However, 3 weeks ago upon arriving home, the male who I kept by himself on one side of the divider/mini-fence - managed to get over it but still could not reach the other male because I kept both of them secured. The male who was kept with the female got into "attack mode" toward the other male. (All of this happened so fast.). The female jumped on the male who was being growled at by her "roommate." Bad, bad situation. He got the better of her & then ran to the male who initiated the situation & started fighting him. A neighbor called 911, the police came & I gave them permission to shoot one of the males (the one with prior issues). The surviving male then began eating the dead male, at which point I decided I could not keep that male. The female died 4 days later from internal injuries. Like I said, it never crossed my mind that something like this could happen. Pits/pit mixes can be very volatile.
 
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