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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I ran a search and roughly 90% of the responses to "what's the best age to spy" on here are incorrect. I have gotten the same answer from 2 different Vets. They both HIGHLY advise to spay BEFORE their first heat. Both Vets stated that in doing so, it GREATLY reduces the likelihood of any female reproductive cancer or disease! :eek: Just wanted to post this for others.

Here is my question....given every dog is different, approximately when do females go into their first heat? My Luna is coming up on 6 months old next weekend.

Thanks!:cheers:

Also, I know there are free clinics who spay and the $ price will vary on location but roughly ballpark figure how much is acceptable to pay? My normal vet who is amazing is way too high at $255 but he does a TON of services like blood work and pain meds etc..I found a place here that had great reviews for only $90! Everyone who got a spay from this Vet said they couldn't believe how small the precise the incision was. :love2: All of the reviews said their pups were up and back to normal in 24hours

With the spay, I plan on having her nails cut (while she's under) as well as micro-chipped and rabies shot!
 

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Early spay actually puts female dogs at an increased risk for bone cancers. There are pros and cons to both sides. Just because two vets gave different advice does not automatically make the info on the forum incorrect. I know several members with female dogs have done extensive research on the topic.

I found this article interesting. It takes both risks and benefits into account of both spaying and not spaying as well as added risk data associated with both depending on the age at alteration.

Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter in Dogs | Dogs Naturally Magazine
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Early spay actually puts female dogs at an increased risk for bone cancers. There are pros and cons to both sides. Just because two vets gave different advice does not automatically make the info on the forum incorrect. I know several members with female dogs have done extensive research on the topic.

I found this article interesting. It takes both risks and benefits into account of both spaying and not spaying as well as added risk data associated with both depending on the age at alteration.

Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter in Dogs | Dogs Naturally Magazine
Define "early"? To me, the pro's heavily out weight the con's. Of course there are going to be con's, like anything. About what age does this breed go into heat normally? Any symptoms I can look for/she will be displaying right before her first heat? Thanks! :cheers:
 

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After 6 months she could technically go into heat at anytime. Symptoms would be swollen vulva and nipples. We recommend to spay before the first heat also. When they are done with their rounds of distemper parvo vaccines. Our spays average $240 because they include bloodwork and meds which are honestly a good idea.. you wouldn't believe how many surgeries we have to postpone due to bad bloodwork like elevated liver enzymes which could cause problems later down the road. The meds are antibiotic and anti inflammatory to make sure it heals well. Basically you get what you pay for. I wont even go into all the details of what goes on during "cheap" surgeries...

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Discussion Starter #5
After 6 months she could technically go into heat at anytime. Symptoms would be swollen vulva and nipples. We recommend to spay before the first heat also. When they are done with their rounds of distemper parvo vaccines. Our spays average $240 because they include bloodwork and meds which are honestly a good idea.. you wouldn't believe how many surgeries we have to postpone due to bad bloodwork like elevated liver enzymes which could cause problems later down the road. The meds are antibiotic and anti inflammatory to make sure it heals well. Basically you get what you pay for. I wont even go into all the details of what goes on during "cheap" surgeries...

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Good info thank you. That is exactly what my Vet told me :eek:
 

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Define "early"? To me, the pro's heavily out weight the con's. Of course there are going to be con's, like anything. About what age does this breed go into heat normally? Any symptoms I can look for/she will be displaying right before her first heat? Thanks! :cheers:
Early meaning pediatric spay (prior to maturity). It's your dog, do with her what you will I was simply pointing out that there are valid arguments for and against waiting to spay. Because someone else's interpretation of information brought them to a different conclusion than advice you received doesn't make it incorrect.
 

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Dirty Girl
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When you remove the risk for one type of cancer, you can open the door for other types of cancers.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Early meaning pediatric spay (prior to maturity). It's your dog, do with her what you will I was simply pointing out that there are valid arguments for and against waiting to spay. Because someone else's interpretation of information brought them to a different conclusion than advice you received doesn't make it incorrect.
Cheers :cheers:

All I'm saying is that I just noticed a lot of threads with statements like "I would never spay/neuter before 18-24 months" and "Spaying/neutering your dog early is a very bad thing" etc and I didn't want those looking for answers to stumble upon this misinformation. Misinformation and ignorance is to blame for a lot of real world issues today unfortunately. And guess what? While people are "waiting" to hit that false time to spay (after 1 or 2 or whatever amount of heats) the dog next dog creeps into the yard and BOOM, another addition to our over population of dogs....dog's that most likely will end up in a shelter and euthanized. The pro's and con's of spaying "Early" or before their first heat is a no-brainer. The pro's heavily outweigh the cons, and this seems to be the consensus of Veterinarians across the country.

I'm going to listen to those who went to school specifically for these types of things. Vets

Not that it's god send...but this is from WebMD:

"We spay or neuter dogs at our clinic at 8 weeks as long as they weigh at least two pounds. Of course, it varies by breed. Some of the tiny breeds have to be done later. But larger breeds are usually ready by two months of age.

Those ideas about needing to wait until after a dog is six months or a year old are really antiquated and the evidence is to the contrary. Even the American Veterinary Medical Association supports early spay/neuter.

The puppies recover a lot faster than adults. It's an easier surgery for them, and it reduces the rate of disease later on. It's just a much easier procedure on younger animals."

An estimated 5 million to 8 million animals are euthanized in shelters across this country every year. Many organizations are trying to decrease that number by opening low-cost spay/neuter clinics to prevent more litters of puppies needing homes. One such organization is LifeLine Animal Project, an Atlanta-based nonprofit shelter and clinic that has performed more than 25,000 spay/neuters since 2005. WebMD talked to executive director Rebecca Guinn to learn about the myths and facts surrounding spaying and neutering.

Q: Shouldn't I let my dog have a litter before I spay her?

A: No. Absolutely not. All the medical evidence suggests a dog should be spayed before her first heat. It's much easier for her then because it's a much easier surgery at that time.

Q: Should I let my dog have a heat before I spay her?

A: Medically, it's better to spay your dog before her first heat. It greatly reduces the risk of mammary tumors. People who wait to spay their dogs until after their second heat greatly increase the risk of mammary tumors in their pets. Once they've had several heats, intact female dogs have a one out of four chance of developing mammary tumors.

Now I'm pretty sure that WebMD can't post false information on their site... and their lawyers would advise them of the same.:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
When you remove the risk for one type of cancer, you can open the door for other types of cancers.
I agree....Pro's versus Con's here though. It seems some of you on here are advocating waiting to spay/neuter, which is simply not right. My opinion.
 

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Cheers :cheers:

All I'm saying is that I just noticed a lot of threads with statements like "I would never spay/neuter before 18-24 months" and "Spaying/neutering your dog early is a very bad thing" etc and I didn't want those looking for answers to stumble upon this misinformation. Misinformation and ignorance is to blame for a lot of real world issues today unfortunately. And guess what? While people are "waiting" to hit that false time to spay (after 1 or 2 or whatever amount of heats) the dog next dog creeps into the yard and BOOM, another addition to our over population of dogs....dog's that most likely will end up in a shelter and euthanized. The pro's and con's of spaying "Early" or before their first heat is a no-brainer. The pro's heavily outweigh the cons, and this seems to be the consensus of Veterinarians across the country.

I'm going to listen to those who went to school specifically for these types of things. Vets

Not that it's god send...but this is from WebMD:

"We spay or neuter dogs at our clinic at 8 weeks as long as they weigh at least two pounds. Of course, it varies by breed. Some of the tiny breeds have to be done later. But larger breeds are usually ready by two months of age.

Those ideas about needing to wait until after a dog is six months or a year old are really antiquated and the evidence is to the contrary. Even the American Veterinary Medical Association supports early spay/neuter.

The puppies recover a lot faster than adults. It's an easier surgery for them, and it reduces the rate of disease later on. It's just a much easier procedure on younger animals."

An estimated 5 million to 8 million animals are euthanized in shelters across this country every year. Many organizations are trying to decrease that number by opening low-cost spay/neuter clinics to prevent more litters of puppies needing homes. One such organization is LifeLine Animal Project, an Atlanta-based nonprofit shelter and clinic that has performed more than 25,000 spay/neuters since 2005. WebMD talked to executive director Rebecca Guinn to learn about the myths and facts surrounding spaying and neutering.

Q: Shouldn't I let my dog have a litter before I spay her?

A: No. Absolutely not. All the medical evidence suggests a dog should be spayed before her first heat. It's much easier for her then because it's a much easier surgery at that time.

Q: Should I let my dog have a heat before I spay her?

A: Medically, it's better to spay your dog before her first heat. It greatly reduces the risk of mammary tumors. People who wait to spay their dogs until after their second heat greatly increase the risk of mammary tumors in their pets. Once they've had several heats, intact female dogs have a one out of four chance of developing mammary tumors.

Now I'm pretty sure that WebMD can't post false information on their site... and their lawyers would advise them of the same.:eek:
No one is saying that there aren't risks. But the risks go both ways. Web md also excluded the various problems that can occur because of early spaying like bone cancers and growth plate issues. so they can still be listing fact without covering the entire breath of the question at hand. Like I said, pros and cons.

I believe that the vast majority of support in favor of early spaying/neutering operates under the assumption that the average pet owner is a complete idiot and not responsible enough to prevent accidental litters. Hence the push to spay before the first heat.

I'm not trying to talk you out of spaying your bitch.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No one is saying that there aren't risks. But the risks go both ways. Web md also excluded the various problems that can occur because of early spaying like bone cancers and growth plate issues. so they can still be listing fact without covering the entire breath of the question at hand. Like I said, pros and cons.

I believe that the vast majority of support in favor of early spaying/neutering operates under the assumption that the average pet owner is s complete idiot and not responsible enough to prevent accidental litters. Hence the push to spay before the first heat.
Totally agree with you. On both statements. Unfortunately, it is not an "assumption" though...the majority of people really are stupid :snow: fact.

For conversations sake, what is your stance personally on spaying/neutering age? With your pups, when did you spay and neuter and why?
 

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No one is saying that there aren't risks. But the risks go both ways. Web md also excluded the various problems that can occur because of early spaying like bone cancers and growth plate issues. so they can still be listing fact without covering the entire breath of the question at hand. Like I said, pros and cons.

I believe that the vast majority of support in favor of early spaying/neutering operates under the assumption that the average pet owner is a complete idiot and not responsible enough to prevent accidental litters. Hence the push to spay before the first heat.

I'm not trying to talk you out of spaying your bitch.
I think that is EXACTLY why vets push to spay/neuter early!
 

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And that all the factual, medical information is not a determining factor in that push? :poke:
I've read the info on both sides. I feel there is no rush for me to neuter my dog. I will let him mature to his full extent with all of his natural hormones in tact and neuter when he's done.
 

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Totally agree with you. On both statements. Unfortunately, it is not an "assumption" though...the majority of people really are stupid :snow: fact.

For conversations sake, what is your stance personally on spaying/neutering age? With your pups, when did you spay and neuter and why?
My male is intact. No intention of breeding him, just my husband's preference (don't get me started on my husband's obsession with the dog's "chicken mcnibblets"). Our female sheltie mix was given to us by my in laws already spayed though she did have one heat before they finally got her fixed (they would be the irresponsible type of owners previously mentioned). I haven't owned an unaltered female dog so I haven't formed an opinion one way or another. If and when I do I will likely do a lot of research on the topic before making an informed decision. Though my next dog will likely be from a breeder so there is always the possibility that my next dog, if female, will be left intact for the purpose of show and competition.
 

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Totally agree with you. On both statements. Unfortunately, it is not an "assumption" though...the majority of people really are stupid :snow: fact.

For conversations sake, what is your stance personally on spaying/neutering age? With your pups, when did you spay and neuter and why?
I know I'm not who you're talking too but ill chime in:) we wait to neuter after maturity between 1-2. Sheba was spayed before my husband got her and she was 1 when he got her so she was spayed early. Cain was a month past his first birth day and we neutered him. This new little guy we have now wont be neutered until he has matured. It's personal choice. Cain is living a perfectly happy and healthy life even though he was neutered at 1.

As regards to price, my vet does it off of weight. So if I would have taken Cain there it would have been 100 ish dollars because he was about 60 pounds.
But look around because some places will off discounted or free spay/neuter for pitbulls. My humane society did and so I got Cain done free. I paid a very very small amount for some pain killers and then also got him microchipped while he was under.

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Discussion Starter #18
I've read the info on both sides. I feel there is no rush for me to neuter my dog. I will let him mature to his full extent with all of his natural hormones in tact and neuter when he's done.
How will you know when he's "done"?
 

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Dirty Girl
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My girl is almost 2 and still intact. I've read article that supports waiting until mature to fix. I feel no rush to spay my dog for the sole purpose of reducing cancer. The average age for Mammary Cancer is 5-10, rarely seen in dogs under 2.

I fully support your decision to spay whenever you want. But to say other research is misinformation and ignorant because you don't agree with it is not right.
 
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