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I'll be the first to admit that I hug my dog - not frequently (I'm not much of a hugger in general) - but enough to be troubled by the news that hugging your dog actually stresses him out. According to a recent report, hugging your dog may cause your his stress level to increase, and even though you might feel better, your dog certainly doesn't.

The idea of hugging your dog is widespread, with books such as 'Smooch Your Pooch' gracing many a bookshelf. The book talks about how kids should hug and kiss their dog anytime they please. The book was so popular, while being so incorrect, that the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB) released a statement explaining that they strongly advise parents to avoid purchasing the book, as the information it contained could cause children to be bitten by dogs.
Read more about Hugging Your Dog Stresses Him Out at PetGuide.com.
 

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Read that last week too. I think it depends on the dog and what the dog is used to. Don't hug my dog myself but I have four grand daughters that hug them constantly and mine both love it. Anyone can say anything and make up stats to back it up these days.

Joe
 

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I've also read about this. From reading her body language and cues, I can tell that my Leila simply tolerates hugs. She's fine with me since I've been the main human in her life since she was little, but whenever my bf tries to hug her she turns away so quickly; clearly not a fan. She still enjoys petting and belly rubs from him though :)
 

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I agree with Joe, I think it depends on the individual dog (much like people, I know some who are very physically affectionate and others who feel like their skin is crawling off and are not physically demonstrative). I think you need to read the dog in front of you.

Veronica "asks" for hugs. She comes up to you and pushes her head into your legs. This results in her human bending down and "hugging" her and if she's feeling especially affectionate, she'll lift her paw and basically try to crawl on/get closer to you. If you try to pull away or get up before she's done, she'll follow you and keep pushing into you.
 

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I agree with Joe, I think it depends on the individual dog (much like people, I know some who are very physically affectionate and others who feel like their skin is crawling off and are not physically demonstrative). I think you need to read the dog in front of you.

Veronica "asks" for hugs. She comes up to you and pushes her head into your legs. This results in her human bending down and "hugging" her and if she's feeling especially affectionate, she'll lift her paw and basically try to crawl on/get closer to you. If you try to pull away or get up before she's done, she'll follow you and keep pushing into you.
I agree, it depends on the dog and the human. Zik is generally a hugger and he seems to enjoy them.
 
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