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Banned
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Taken from "The American Staffordshire Terrier" by Jacqueline Fraser:

Ike Stinson served as a Board member and was STCA Delegate to the AKC during a crucial point in the breed's modern history. When the AKC opened their books to Staffordshires in 1936, many breeders of good dogs did not register them. Some fanciers feared that showing in the breed ring would eventually ruin the dogs because it would lead to breeding for appearance at the expense of temperament. Other fanciers resented the name "Staffordshire," preferring the UKC's "American (Pit) Bull Terrier" designation for their dogs. Until 1963, pure bred dogs that had not been registered with the AKC were allowed to be shown at AKC breed shows. The owner was simply required to fill in the show entry and check "Listed" instead of writing in an AKC registration number. After the exhibitor had shown his dog three times in this manner, and if he wished to continue showing, he requested permission from AKC. However, even though the Listed dog could win a championship, his progeny were not eligible for registration. By the mid-1950s, one-third to one-half of the Stafs that were entered at major shows and National Specialties were Listed dogs. Some of the top winners with desirable bloodlines did not have AKC registration numbers and consequently could not be used to produce AKC puppies.

The quality of the Listed Stafs of that time may best be understood by taking a look at some Specialty results. At the 1958 National Specialty in Atlanta, Ch. Knight Crusader was Best of Breed, Tacoma Cherokee Rose was Best of Opposite Sex, and Knight Patroller was Winners Dog. All three were Listed. At the National Specialty in Detroit in 1959, Best of Breed was Ch. Knight Crusader and Winners Bitch/Best of Opposite Sex was Jones G-a-y One Goldie. Both of these dogs were Listed. Best of Winners that year was Ch. Rip Rock Irish Mike, the only registered dog in two years to obtain a major win at a National Specialty.

A full-page ad in the 1959 Specialty catalog advertising Betty Tregoning's Lylane Kennel, showed a picture of Ch. Lylane Princess Amber, CD, the 1956 Specialty winner and top producing bitch. She was Listed, as were her eight champion get, including Ch. Lylane Bucky-T and Ch. Archer's Diablo Bandino. It was obvious ther was a real need for this fine stock to outcross with the registered dogs and, consequently, the STCA voted to correct this situation. In 1956 Ike Stinson was appointed Chairman of the Registration Committee.

For the next several years, at his own expense, Mr. Stinson made trips to the AKC offices in New York, wrote countless letters, and compiled the necessary statistics to present to the AKC with the hope that it would open it's registration books to the Listed dogs. The AKC turned down the request in 1958 but that didn't stop Mr. Stinson -- nor Howard Hadley, who also was working on the project. Finally, on February 18, 1960, John Neff, a Vice President of the American Kennel Club, sent the historic letter to Mr. Stinson informing him that as of February 18, 1960, and until February 18, 1963, AKC registrations would be accepted for qualifying litters but not for individual dogs. This was acceptable to STCA since it served the purpose of enabling breeders to use the quality Listed dogs to produce AKC registerable litters. To be certain that the Listed dog was a worthy sire or dam, the AKC stipulated that the three generation pedigree submitted must include at least one registered dog and that the Listed dog must have at least one major win at the time that notice of intention to breed was filed with AKC.


 

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K9 Pshrynk & Conciliare~
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Good post... nice find. Its good for the masses to see the AST stems from the APBT genetically they're the same. What seperates them is genetic task and passing of those traits. AS the fear mentioned in the first paragraph is EXACTLY what happened to the AST. Had to have at least one win, ? LOL ... they dropped that jargon EARLY but its good for all to see exactly how they seeded foundation by anothers take.
 

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I'm the blue dragon!
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"Some fanciers feared that showing in the breed ring would eventually ruin the dogs because it would lead to breeding for appearance at the expense of temperament."

funny they had this fear in the 30's and here we are modern day and turns out in some cases... they were right.
 

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APBT!
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Very interesting article, and good for the new folks to see the other side of the history of the dogs we love so much. Thank you very much for sharing that.
 
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