Go Pitbull Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
We have been waiting for a puppy we picked out to get old enough to come home with us....what is the earliest a puppy can leave its mommy?
The owner said he will be ready at 5 weeks...He just started eating food last week....when do they stop nursing?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,824 Posts
They should stay with mom and litter mates until at least 8 weeks. There are things they learn in that time period. Why is the person you are getting the puppy from letting them leave so early? That there would be a red flag for a byb for me.

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Pits Are For Chicks
Joined
·
16,246 Posts
No 5 weeks is way to young. 8 weeks is when they should leave. Sadly the owner doesn't know what they are doing and shouldn't be having puppies.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ::::COACH::::

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's what I thought, but I don't know what to do now....They will prolly give him away to someone else if I refuse him...especially if they don't care about his well being....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Too many lessons are taught from that 4-5 week to the 8 week period. Taking the pup now, would be more harm to the pup itself. Keep in mind that the dam no longer cleans behind the pups like she used to, so alot of lazy byb like to get rid of the responsibilities early and get the cash faster. A breeder who cares about his line and dogs general, wants the best for the dogs even when they're no longer in his possession.

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I apologize if this posts twice......
I agree, and now realize that they don't care about his well being at all. I do feel a responsibility towards him, for some reason, and hate the fact that if we don't get him, they will find someone else who doesn't care about his well being and eagerly take him home....we can't provide the nurturing etc that his mama and liter mates can provide, but at least in our home I know he will safe and be well cared for the best we can.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,000 Posts
Understood you feel for the one pup but if you do get him you're encouraging them to keep doing it. Let someone else encourage them. Don't make it easy for them to offload they goods, which is all they are to them. If they don't care about the dogs who knows why kind of temperament you will get who knows how they were bred to begin with.

All mamas stop nursing between 4-5 weeks. If the mother wants nothing to do with them they still benefit from being with all their siblings

Sent from Petguide.com App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,824 Posts
Understood you feel for the one pup but if you do get him you're encouraging them to keep doing it. Let someone else encourage them. Don't make it easy for them to offload they goods, which is all they are to them. If they don't care about the dogs who knows why kind of temperament you will get who knows how they were bred to begin with.

All mamas stop nursing between 4-5 weeks. If the mother wants nothing to do with them they still benefit from being with all their siblings

Sent from Petguide.com App
This. And say that other person takes the pup. They may not know any better for taking it at a young age, but still give it a loving home where it's happy. Can't think the other persons who take it don't care. They may just not know.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,356 Posts
Hello Schill. Welcome to the forum. You did the right thing by coming here and asking and you have been receptive to people's suggestions. GREAT start.
Even though you may be a little attached to the pup as it won your heart over, my suggestion would be to find a different pup with a reputable breeder. From what you have described this is a back yard breeder that is only looking to make some money by using the Dam without concern for her or the liters well being. For me it would send up a big red flag and I would walk away from this one. JMO.

Hope all works out for you,
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, it was all "odd" from the start, and my hubby told me when we first went to see him!
I saw the post about breeders on here, but didn't see anything recent, or from my area. How to find a reputable breeder? I always thought going to a breeder was for a particular bloodline, for show etc...I certainly can't pay $1500 plus for a pup!! I've seen some websites where pups are that much and more from a kennel...
Thx everyone 4 your comments!

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Price doesn't equal value, there are great breeders who place dogs for free in trusted homes and complete backyard breeders charging thousands. You aren't saving much on purchase price if you end up paying for it in the long run anyways. For instance my dogs are rescues but originally from bybs, nice dogs but not good examples of the breed and more likely to have health issues, I've spent a small fortune on knee injuries, allergies, infections that are probably due to poor breeding.

Pass on this puppy, how do you feel responsible for this pup and not the rest of the litter or what happens to mom? What about the next litter? Putting money in the bybs pocket just encourages them to do it again. There's no shortage of suckers.

There is a lot of social skills learned by staying with the litter and if the "breeder" doesn't know or care about that it's unlikely he cares about breeding healthy or well tempered dogs and he's probably not been doing any of the socialization and handling of the pups a good breeder would either. Don't set yourself up for problems and heartbreak right off the bat, there is no shortage of pit bulls with sob stories or in need of homes, find one that suits you and meets what you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Price doesn't equal value, there are great breeders who place dogs for free in trusted homes and complete backyard breeders charging thousands. You aren't saving much on purchase price if you end up paying for it in the long run anyways. For instance my dogs are rescues but originally from bybs, nice dogs but not good examples of the breed and more likely to have health issues, I've spent a small fortune on knee injuries, allergies, infections that are probably due to poor breeding.

Pass on this puppy, how do you feel responsible for this pup and not the rest of the litter or what happens to mom? What about the next litter? Putting money in the bybs pocket just encourages them to do it again. There's no shortage of suckers.

There is a lot of social skills learned by staying with the litter and if the "breeder" doesn't know or care about that it's unlikely he cares about breeding healthy or well tempered dogs and he's probably not been doing any of the socialization and handling of the pups a good breeder would either. Don't set yourself up for problems and heartbreak right off the bat, there is no shortage of pit bulls with sob stories or in need of homes, find one that suits you and meets what you want.
Well put. ;) That's the truth.
 

·
Pits Are For Chicks
Joined
·
16,246 Posts
Yeah, it was all "odd" from the start, and my hubby told me when we first went to see him!
I saw the post about breeders on here, but didn't see anything recent, or from my area. How to find a reputable breeder? I always thought going to a breeder was for a particular bloodline, for show etc...I certainly can't pay $1500 plus for a pup!! I've seen some websites where pups are that much and more from a kennel...
Thx everyone 4 your comments!
You don't need to go to a breeder unless you are looking for a purebred dog or a dog to compete. Shelters have many dogs in need of homes that come from situations like this one. However when you get it from the shelter rather than the backyard breeder it discourages them to breed again when they can't find homes easily for puppies. Puppies are a lot to care for and when they can't be pawned off and start really being pains at 6-12 weeks old it makes you think twice about breeding. You have to want to put the effort in a litter to deal with puppies at that age as they take a lot of time and attention.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MSK

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,000 Posts
You don't need to go to a breeder unless you are looking for a purebred dog or a dog to compete. Shelters have many dogs in need of homes that come from situations like this one. However when you get it from the shelter rather than the backyard breeder it discourages them to breed again when they can't find homes easily for puppies. Puppies are a lot to care for and when they can't be pawned off and start really being pains at 6-12 weeks old it makes you think twice about breeding. You have to want to put the effort in a litter to deal with puppies at that age as they take a lot of time and attention.
This^^^

Sent from Petguide.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
We has to get/ rescue our puppy at 5 weeks old. Her mom was a first time mother and was not good with puppies. I think if the breeder is just being irresponsible it is probably not the right place to get a puppy from. That being said if you do end up getting a puppy that young it is alt of work. Our puppy is six months old now and amazing, but we took her to puppy socializing classes weekly till she was 2 months old and worked a lot on night inhibition. I ended up switching to a night shift till she was four months old so that I could work with her and train her everyday. She would not eat solid food for the first week so we fed her formula mixed with orijen puppy for the first week. We also constantly had people over and other calm dogs play with her so she would learn how to behave. Good luck on finding a puppy, the people on this site are very helpful.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top