Go Pitbull Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 19 month old female pit has a slight tear in her left ACL (which the vet says she can see is healing and to keep doing what I am doing) and VERY MILD hip dysplasia in her right hip. She said it is SUPER mild and to not be concerned with it now. It could cause her to have arthritis later in life and this is super common in pits.

What can I do to try and better it now while it is so mild and prevent arthritis in the future?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
My 18 month old female pit went through the same exact thing. She had a partial tear of her CrCL (ACL). I did a lot of research on the subject and ultimately came to the conclusion that it would not heal itself or go away. Pits have a very high tolerance for pain and may not show it, but they are hurting. I had her evaluated by my regular vet, who is part of a 6 doctor practice. After X-rays (which don't show a torn ACL), tests for valley fever 4 of the 6 docs consulted and checked her out and it was decided that she had a partial tear. The decision was made to get it repaired before it ultimately tore all the way. Our regular vets practice does not do this type of orthopedic surgery. It is a speciality that should only be done by a board certified canine surgery.

A partial tear will ultimately fully tear with time. Our dogs injury happened in a dog park but it can occur from jumping on furniture, a slip on some tile or just about any wrong move. We had our dogs knee fixed using TPLO surgery. In 7 weeks she was back at 100%. Statistically, dogs who tear one ACL will tear the other one within 3 years. Our dog just tore the right one and that was also repaired and we are still in the recovery stage (3 weeks post op) and she is walking on all 4 paws very nicely, but still on restricted activity for another month.

If you decide to go ahead with knee surgery, make sure you pick the proper surgeon as all repairs are not equal. In our area there are about 10 surgeons who do this procedure. Our surgeon is the only one in the area that scopes the knee first. Scoping is important as you can get in closer and see better to clean up the joint. Also scoping allows the surgeon to only make a 3" incision and use about 10 staples to close. Surgeons who don't scope will make an incision about 7 inches long and have to use 30 plus staples. A scoped procedure promotes faster healing, is less traumatic and less prone to infection. Also our surgeon uses cold compression therapy for 24 hours to reduce swelling.

If I can help in any way, just let me know. Good luck.

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I am by no means an authority on the subject. I just know what I know from my personal research and from the vets I have spoken to. Based on that, I am reasonably sure it will eventually tear all the way. I also know from my research that a dog that has a partial tear repaired makes a better recovery than one with a complete tear. That is why we took care of both our dogs knees as quickly as possible.
We also have our pet on glucosamine supplements to prevent arthritis down the line.
Personally, the sooner you take care of the knee the better for your dog.
 

·
Good with tools
Joined
·
9,791 Posts
As with any joint damage, it's usually associated with a dislocation of a certain degree. Where it is pushed past its mechanical limit and something has to give. A partial tear will probably go all the way if the dog is allowed to use it full blast. You have a small window of 6 weeks or so to build scar tissue and muscle to make up for the loss of/or damage to the ligament. It means crate rest and physical therapy for activity only. 1 slip up and your dog will blow it out so you have to be serious about it. Are these the Same dogs that play rough and sleep in the same crate together?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes they are Dave! However since her injury there has been no rough play or exercise which is why it has been healing rather than getting worse. I walk her on leash only and they are out one at a time unless they are sleeping at night. This will continue until she has made a full recovery. Thanks LSands45!
 

·
Good with tools
Joined
·
9,791 Posts
Hand walks are the best. I walk my dogs at the beach, chest deep in the water to create a little resistance. Worked wonders! Your goal is to stabilize that ligament with scar tissue and muscle. Keep that in mind as it improves. Avoid that surgery at all cost! ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Dave! At this point the vet hasn't recommended surgery. I was doing some research. This is what I currently give both of my dogs. Is it too much?

Apple Cider Vinegar
Coconut Oil
The Missing Link powder
Omega 3 pills
Glucosomine and Chondrotin (sp?)
Ester C (just ordered based on research that it really helps with joint stuff)

My next question is should I get the human pills or try and find ones for dogs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
My dog was diagnosed via the drawer test with a likely partial CCl tear a few years ago. It was a very minor injury, some limping after rest; but she never 3 legged it. We saw a surgeon who felt we had a 50% chance of avoiding surgery and he recommended we try conservative management.

It worked. After a period of rest and confinement we started with leash walks building duration, then cavaletti exercises, controlled stair exercises up and down on leash, and as she progressed walking on inclines, then eventually jogging on leash, then a little running on leash.

She did about 1 year later sustain another minor injury to the opposite knee and we healed her the same way.

Since the first injury we give Dasaquin and free form snip tip supplements.

People tend to have different opinions about the injury. Our regular vet said I should just keep her in agility, let her sustain the eventual full tear and then have the surgery. The surgeon was extremely conservative and felt the best course of action was to avoid surgery if possible.
 

·
Good with tools
Joined
·
9,791 Posts
Yes. Anterior drawer, I don't do that test myself because I can loose the patella down the side of the knee if there is inflamation around the patella tendon. Champ had one acl repaired and injured the other one a year later. He's had 10surgeries and I didn't want to put his body thru it again so we opted out of the surgery. 6 years later the repaired joint is very arthritic and he depends on the other to get him mobile. I'm very happy I didn't fix it surgically.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top