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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone here worked with this type of service dog? I will be deaf within the next decade so I was just thinking that training a dog to work with that could be quite handy.
:)
 

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I have worked with deaf dogs and deaf owners when I was teaching an assistance dog class. The best thing to do is find someone local to help you with training they also have programs you can apply for to get a dog who is already trained. There is no advice over the internet I can give other than find someone local because there is a lot of training involved depending on what your needs will be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you. Good plan. I will start checking out the local trainers here and see who can help do this. I don't need an already trained dog but would like to teach them some of the commands that will help later on.

Like... "Hey, wake up, you can't hear the fire alarm but your house is burning down."

It is hard to know what I will need or the exact time line but learning how to train now would be smart I think.
:D
 

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If you can find a trainer locally that is exactly what they can teach your dog to do. Some of the dogs we worked with answered the phone and took it to the owner, told them when someone was at the house, gave an alert when some alarms went off, and other tasks. Your dog at home should be able to do these tasks with the right training. Good luck on the search, if you hit a bunch of dead ends pm me and I will see if I can find them in your area.
 

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NO TROLL PASSIN
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I can't be of no help here, but I hope you don't mind me asking how will you be deaf in a year? What is it you have?

I only ask because I suffer from Otosclerosis and had one surgery so far and was suppose to have another 2 years ago. It never crossed my mind to work my dog for my loss, I would say it is a good idea too. I might even look into something like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
DueceAddicted, the deafness is something that will get worse over time so we know in 10 years I will be deaf just not how much sooner. It is a congenital defect that likely started around the time I turned thirty. It is an interesting hearing loss, I am losing the range in which people speak first. So mens voices then women and so on. Depending on the range they speak in I understand them more or less. At some point hearing aids won't help anymore but I function well with them for now. Nothing can be done to change what will happen so it does seem like that teaching a dog some things to alert me to would be great. It is certainly worth looking into I think. I have been reading up on some of the common things that the dogs are taught, I can see how it could be a real lifesaver.

Thank you so much performanceknls,
I am going to start looking for trainers and some general dog things in the area. I think my daughter is old enough to start enjoying dog shows and other events and teaching her more about animals is always good. I realized I do know a trainer in Oregon, I might reach out to her also. Just to see who she recommends. Or doesn't recommend. lol. I love giving pets jobs to do.

:)
 

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Its not something that can be helped with surgery?
I'm just wondering how much different it is from what I have. I was losing my hearing in my late 20's and by the time I was 30 I had lost total hearing in my right ear and 65% in my left. I lived like that for almost 2 years I could only hear you if you were in front of me and I could see your lips to form your words, then I can hear them in whispers or every other word. I was offered hearing aids but they said after a while they wouldn't help but we could try surgery it was a 50/50 chance I had the surgery to implant a prosthetic in my right ear because the bone for sound was deteriorating, its hereditary, implant took. My left ear is worse now I can't hear anything if I'm laying on my right side, or your walking on my left. I was suppose to have the other side done asap but things got in the way and another surgery for something else that almost killed me so I'm a little worried about being put under again. It might even be to late they say to repair it, and who knows how long this prosthetic will last, so I'm facing the same out come if it gives way since I can only hear on my right.
I'm glad you brought this up I thank you cause I never thought about having my boy taught a few basics to help. Like when I'm sleeping I don't hear alarms, doors, bells, phones, smoke detectors nothing ...... Sorry for running on in your thread, again I thank you for bringing this up wish you the best ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Surgery can't help. I might be able to get the cochlear implant. They aren't a magic bullet though. No telling if I would adjust. And choosing to get one is a big step since it would make me lose all my hearing so there would be no going back. If I did that I would hope it worked well and I adjust quickly. Either way having a dog to help would be smart I think. I am learning sign language also. I like to have my bases covered. :)

I would say my situation sounds, pardon the pun, like it is better then yours. I am still early in the loss and hearing aids do work for me for now. Of course, my hearing aids are 5k and not covered by insurance. Ouch! I am still learning a lot I found out about this in December. Lip reading is so handy, I don't think people realize how important it is to us. I can understand not being sure about surgery. In your case I don't know what I would do either.

I am really glad I brought up the topic though, I think your in such a great position to have your dogs help you out. I am pretty excited to hear what you can teach them. There are just some basic sounds out there that we really don't want to miss. Besides, it is always a pleasure teaching a dog new jobs.
 

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I have to truly agree. Thanks for even making this a topic and taking the time to talk to me. Sad that people take for granted these basic things, sound, touch, sight. I take in every sound now. When I healed from surgery I could here the inside of my body it was the weirdest thing. We live with that sound but as we grow from newborn to adults we become accustomed to these sounds. Granted it drove me mad til it finally faded lol. My small dogs barking tho thats a sound I could do with out!
I'm definitely going to see if he's capable of learning such tasks, cause yes a smoke detector while your sleeping going off and you can't hear it is not something you want to not be able to hear.
Oh and don't worry about the pun lol I'm not that bad off I've learned to use my right side hearing pretty well its 100% ......
Maybe we can keep each other posted on the progress ...... I will start my search when I land in atlanta next month ...... thanks for the great idea
 

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Both of my in-laws are deaf... The dogs communicate just fine with them, and they communicate fine with the dogs. I've never taken my dogs off of hand signals while training for this very reason.... don't get me wrong, I can look at any one of my dogs and say "down" and they'll down, but for my inlaws they have a hand motion. They have a lamp that blinks when they get phone calls and a separate light that flashes when someone rings the door bell.... I do agree to TRY to find a local trainer, but please don't get fooled into the over acheiver trainers who think they know it all. Find someone who has done this for years for it to be reliable...and sometimes the years of experience do not out weigh the current day learning seminars that are available for trainers.

Trust me, if there's a fire your dog will tell ya i promise.
 
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