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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, our neighbor got this puppy, then had to move so we told him we had had a home for him. My aunt. (where I moved to in Baton Rouge, LA.) Anywho.. my uncle recently passed and she was scared to stay in the house alone so she was lookin' for a pup to grow up around her and the kids so it was like ment to be.

but, recently since I've been letting him in and out he looks VERY bow-legged. He isn't hurting or anything. but, it looks almost broken-ish. I didn't know if its normal or should I be worried and take it to the vet. figured i'd ask y'all before i get too worked up.

Lemme know what y'all think. Please & Thank you!!

AND ALSOOO !! My mom wormed him 2 weeks ago & he is still pooping worms. not alot but there are still a few coming out in his stool. his stool is solid though.



 

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Proud CGC Parent
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That's what's called "knuckling over". Google it so you can get an idea of what it is and take him to the vet. You're going to need to nip this in the bud before it gets any worse and formulate a plan of action with your vet.

Also, worm him again. One de-worming dose is not likely to get rid of all the worms, especially if they've had a chance to, um, percolate? in him? lol.
 

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Oh, forgot something else.

What are you feeding him?
if you are feeding him too much protein this can happen, as kane said. You need to get this corrected while you still have time. Good catch noticing earlier is best! If you search on knuckling on here or look in the health and nutrition section you will see some good advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay, well the puppy has his shots. We just recently noticed it started.
The vet will tell us what we need to do?
 

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Let me re-phrase this ...

Because I'm a paranoid owner, I would take Kane to the vet, get my vet's advice on what I should do, and keep the vet up to date on what is going on with the knuckling, as if you don't get the knuckling in check it can progress to the point of surgery.

BUT.

If you switch your puppy to a lower protein food, that will help correct it. It slows down the growth to give your pup's legs a chance to balance out.
 

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English Dogge Yard
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if you are feeding him too much protein this can happen, as kane said. You need to get this corrected while you still have time. Good catch noticing earlier is best! If you search on knuckling on here or look in the health and nutrition section you will see some good advice.
Protein alone has nothing to do with it. Now if you pair up protein and genetic concerns that is what can cause things like this to happen. I have fed high protein diets to any dog owned from pup to senior not once having an issue. (most at least 36%) Not all dogs can handle high protein (unless you are working your dog heavily or being worked not really much of a point to begin with) but i wouldn't just blame the protein levels.
 

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Protein alone has nothing to do with it. Now if you pair up protein and genetic concerns that is what can cause things like this to happen. I have fed high protein diets to any dog owned from pup to senior not once having an issue. (most at least 36%) Not all dogs can handle high protein (unless you are working your dog heavily or being worked not really much of a point to begin with) but i wouldn't just blame the protein levels.
that's why I said it CAN happen :) totally a possibility it COULD be the amount protein right? Also why I included the links. Almost all discuss the protein, but I know that you like high protein and had no issues. Some pups do though...
 

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English Dogge Yard
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that's why I said it CAN happen :) totally a possibility it COULD be the amount protein right? Also why I included the links. Almost all discuss the protein, but I know that you like high protein and had no issues. Some pups do though...
Wasnt really arguing just making it clear that protein alone isn't a issue and other things contribute. :)
 

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Wasnt really arguing just making it clear that protein alone isn't a issue and other things contribute. :)
oh me either! Thanks for clarifying though...
 

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Ask Lauren she helped a guy and his dog who was knuckling over worse than this get his dogs front end back to normal. When this happens it's almost always dietary or genetic. It can be fixed though through proper diet keeping the dog off hard surfaces ... you will also most likely have to wrap the feet with vet wrap and splints. Lauren will tell you about the diet. I think she recommends a raw diet for this one. I will send her a PM now so she can post on this thread.
 

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GP's Dr. Phil
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Dang Sadie- ya beat me to the move lol.
 

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OCD Bullyologist
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Pup is definitely knuckling, which is often the result of lack of Vitamin D (sunshine etc) and usually a crappy quality food. A friend of mine on a bully forum had a pup knuckling way worse than this pup and this is what I recommended:
1 cup of Taste of the wild Salmon

here are all the additives to his meal.....cod liver oil, apple cider vinegar, and yogurt!

After pouring the kibble into his feed bowl I add 1 "tea spoon" of cod liver oil....if you look at the dosage instructions on the label one pump equals 1 tea spoon so thats what I add. I then mix it around untill all the kibbles in his bowl are shiny with oil.


I then add 1 tea spoon of yogurt



Before i mix all the yogurt in I add the 1 tea spoon of apple cider vinegar directly on top of the dollip of yogurt.

Now I mix it and Vui'lla' ( or ta-daa! for us americans) the dinner is served!

He likes it!


Google Carpal Laxity and there is a ton of info. I'll post before and after pics of my friend's dog. It is amazing.
 

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OCD Bullyologist
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Your pup looks like he is at a level 1 (maybe 2) of knuckling, which can be corrected with wrapping (it may or may not be that extreme yet) and change of diet (most cases take about 9-10 weeks before a dog can fully support its own weight again). Poor quality diet or too much of a good food, poor footing/slick floors with no rugs, and missing trace minerals are all things that contribute to this problem. The earlier you treat the problem the better chance of correcting it. I have seen a 9 week old pup corrected in about 8 or 9 days because it was caught early. You need balance between calcium, phosphorus, vitamin d and the age - don't experiment.
Too much vitamin D causes issues as well as too little vitamin d so the key is BALANCE.
Holistic low protein dog food is what I have read works the best in correcting issues like this.


  • VET
  • PUT HIM ON A LOW PROTEIN DOG FOOD (23-25%)
  • Sunlight
  • Cod liver oil
  • DO NOT FEED EGGS!
    • RAW EGGS Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems.
    • EGG SHELLS Provide our dogs with much needed calcium. Eggshells consist of calcium carbonate (94%), magnesium carbonate (1%), calcium phosphate (1%), and organic matter (4%).

Knuckling over is caused by the following:​
1) a combination of two different types or brands of dog foods - feeding (50/50)
2) the brand or type of food has been changed several times (3-4) times
3) the addition of poor quality vitamins/minerals to a diet (not from whole foods)
4) human foods in amounts enough to disrupt the calcium/phosphorus balance
5) too many calories vs the amount of free exercise they get on a daily bases
6) feeding a pet food that has minerals that are not very available to the body - crude forms
7) diets lacking vital microminerals or trace minerals
8) feeding too much of a good food
9) any or all of the above.​
 

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Work them Pet Bulls!
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Protein alone has nothing to do with it. Now if you pair up protein and genetic concerns that is what can cause things like this to happen. I have fed high protein diets to any dog owned from pup to senior not once having an issue. (most at least 36%) Not all dogs can handle high protein (unless you are working your dog heavily or being worked not really much of a point to begin with) but i wouldn't just blame the protein levels.
This is where I get confused?? I have also fed my past two dogs a high protein diet with no issues up until I got Bella who was fed TOTW prairie as a puppy started by the breeder and she started knuckling. So now she has been on BB lamb and brown rice for the past 5 months. I am soon making the switch to Acana next month because she will be a year old. So here is my question.....you aren't supposed to "work" a puppy hard and you hear all this controversy of high protein diets and issues. My girl isn't going to be hog hunting or anything to that affect but we are by no means couch potatoe's so I feel better having her on a higher protein grain free diet. In your opinion KM why is the high protein diets only beneficial to "working dogs" persay? The Acana I am putting her on is the grasslands at 32% protein. I think it should be based on your dogs activity level not just work alone. I live in the city and hike, jog, walk, etc. Bella is my companion in all of that so her activity is high. I am just picking your brain KM ;) I like to hear your opinions is all :)
 
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