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..........8 months later, after being exposed to COUNTLESS different scenarios, Cairo still shakes and looks like hes about to shake right out of his skin, mainly around trains, and rough play, and when he REALLY REALLY REALLY has to go pee....... LOL It's almost like the pee pee dance for the last one. (He is now 10.5 months, so he's still young). will he ever get over it, a few people have asked if he has a nerve condition. :-/ I hope not. His vet just said he was shy.. :-/ what do u think? anyone else deal with this?
 

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Work them Pet Bulls!
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My girl is shy to and is a scardy cat but she doesn't shake LOL! That sounds terrible....poor boy. I know my girls problem though....she was left with the breeder until over 4 months old so she missed critical weeks of socializing at an early age. I feel as if I got her at 8 weeks she would be a totally different dog. Makes me mad when I think about. The breeders lived in the woods of NH so it was hard for them to really socalize her. You don't hear trains and all kinds of city noises in the country! Anyways, how old was your boy when you got him? Have you taken him to OB classes. How persistent are you with socializing him? I mean my girl has gotten over most things except for a few but I have been adimant in descencitizing her. She is 9 months old and I am still hoping the other things she is scared of will diminish. She is such a chicken LOL!!
 

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If the dog has been properly socialized, has had training to help build confidence and does not have a medical condition it could very well be a temperament issue as this is not normal behavior for the breed. Sometimes with maturity dogs grow out of certain behaviors and even if it is a temperament issue sometimes it can be helped with training. The word shy isn't a normal thing to hear with this breed...
 

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Bullet will shake when he gets extremely excited, and he used to shake like a leaf when it was feeding time. The way I stop it for the excited part is not to give any attention to the behavior. If he gets so amped up to the point where he shakes (happens during tug-of-war, and any other high-energy play), I just stop playing with him and ignore him. It very rarely happens anymore because I think he realizes now that if he gets too worked up, I'll end playtime. As for his food issues, it all stemmed from his previous owners, as they did not feed him properly and as much as they should have when he was a puppy, so that made him neurotic when it comes to food. When I feed him, I tell him to sit and stay, and wait until he calms down to let him have his food. He's almost 2 years old, and I've had him since about 5 weeks, and he's just now starting to get to the point where he's actually calm when I feed him.

If your dog's condition is not a neurological issue, I would consult with a professional trainer and see what else you can do to help with his nervousness. You said it's mainly around trains and rough play, so what I would say would be to desensitize him by exposing him to the trains more often and make it a positive experience, either by rewarding him with treats or his favorite toy, just show him that being around trains isn't a big deal. As for the rough play, if it's with other dogs, I would either avoid it completely (which is best with this breed), or just watch him closely and as soon as he starts to shake and get really excited, stop the play. If it's when he's playing with you, as soon as you see him start to shake, stop playing with him and ignore him. If you ignore the behavior, it might take a while, but he will eventually realize that he's gonna lose out on playing if he gets too worked up.
 
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